Exped tents, whatch know about them?

1:12 a.m. on November 30, 2011 (EST)
0 reviewer rep
1,237 forum posts

I"m intereested in Exped tents and have been for  a long time.  Do aany of you have any experiances with them or know of anyone wh does or has.  They are another Euro tent that is not popular in this country but seem to be very quality.  The two tents I'm most interested in are the:

Exped Polaris 2-person Expedition

Details

  • Single wall fabric of highly breathable and ultra-waterproof VentAir 3 layer PTFE laminate specific for tents. Vestiblule of lightweight and tear resistant ripstop nylon with a slicone coating.
  • Fully freestanding: Full length ridge pole supports the structure and forms the vestibule. Of course, such easy setup also means simple teardown! And, for situations in which it is hard to stake out guylines, the poles can be braced together from the inside using the guylines.
  • New for 2011: Center pole now runs outside in a sleeve. Previous models placed the center pole inside the tent and secured it with velcro straps.
  • Fast setup: just slide 4 color-coded poles into their sleeves and tension the pockets; secure and plant 2-4 stakes. That’s it!
  • Covered vestibule for gear and cooking.
  • Ventilation and views on all 4 sides through door, rear window, and two offset tunnel vents.
  • Easy handling, day or night: zippers have color coded, reflective, and glow-in-the-dark pulls that operate easily with just one hand.
  • Reinforced guyline loops attach directly to the pole sleeves. Triple guyline flaps on the sides connect to the floor loop.
  • Guylines of ultralight and static Dyneema with a tear force of 300lbs/ 140kg
  • Taffeta nylon floor with fully taped seams and a water column rating of 14+ PSI (10,000mm).
  • Adjustable guylines made of super strong, lightweight and reflective Dyneema cord are premounted in a stormproof V-configuration.
  • Designed by experience: World class expeditionists like Erhard Lorétan, Jean Troillet, Stephan Siegrist, Sebastien Gay, plus numerous “regular” adventurers are godfathers to the Polaris

Specs


Capacity: 2 adults
Weight: Minimum*: 5.4 # / 2.45 kg
Packaged: 6.5 # / 2.95 kg
Area:
Canopy: 30 sq-f / 2.8 sq-m
Vestibule: 7.5 sq-f / 0.7 sq-m
Materials**:
Canopy: 3 layer VentAir mini ripstop / PTFE / polyester tricot fabric with fully taped seams;
Vestibule: Silicone coated ripstop nylon;
Floor: PU-coated, taffeta nylon with 10,000 mm water column:
Poles: DAC Featherlite NSL 9 mm TH72M aircraft grade aluminium
Packed size: 18x6’’ / 42x16 cm
Setup time: 3 Minute

$(KGrHqN,!lUE65D1KGt8BOu5LRrP)w~~60_12.J

And the Pegasus:

  • Exterior, continuous and color-coded pole sleeves that come sealed at on end and with easy to use adjustable pole tensioners, make setup and teardown quick and easy. One person alone can set up Pegasus.
  • Loads of space: Pegasus has the capacity for 3-4 adults to sleep. With it's steep walls that increase interior space, it can take in many more to sit around during the day. With its tall access, entry and exit are easy, but there is plenty of space to dress or to sort out gear. Numerous pockets and a gear loft help with added organization.
  • Two high doors in the front and one at the back for easy entry and exit. Two vestibules offer space for packs, wet boots and other gear you don’t want in your tent.
  • Four poles of identical length slide into flat pole sleeves in the rain fly. The canopy is pre-installed, and the pole sleeves are numbered to make setup simple and easy. In fact, just one person can easily set up Pegasus.
  • Only 3 stakes are required for a basic setup. Ample pre-mounted Dyneema cord guylines secure the tent in stormy conditions. Stake placement is made easy with large and adjustable Dyneema cord loops.
  • Seven individually adjustable vents (1 front, 2 rear and 4 on sides) placed on all sides of the tent insure excellent ventilation. Vents are supported by pole repair segments.
  • Snow flaps, weighed down by rocks, sand or snow, keep Pegasus steady in storms. They also keep wind, snowdrift and bugs outside, where they belong. They can be rolled up when not required.
  • Pegasus has the capacity to sleep 4 adults, but with its steep walls that maximize interior space it can accommodate visitors during the day. With its high doors, entry and exit is easy without having to crawl. Numerous pockets along the walls and entrace keep personal items organised. A gear loft in the canopy roof for additional storage space.
  • Another Exped innovation are the detachable mesh pockets, that can be cliped onto the outside of the tent. These are ideal for drying gear or storing small items during the day that should be within reach.
  • The vestibule can be rolled up for unobstructed views. The doors have a hanging design so they don't get stepped on when open. They can be operated one handed and are stowed in a roof pocket when open.
  • Versatitly: Canopy and rainfly can be setup separately. In good weather the canopy can be used on it's own and keeps bug and dust out. For a very large, but very lightweight, complete shelter, use the rain fly coupled with the optional footprint.

 

Weight: Minimum*: 13.44 # / 6.1 kg;
LightPackers: 10.4# / 4.72 kg; fly, poles and footprint(sold separately)
UltraLight Packers: 9.1# / 4.16 kg; fly, poles
Packaged: 14.55 # / 6.6 kg;
Area:
Floor: 43 ft2 / 4 m2; Vestibule: 19 ft2 / 1.8 m2
Materials:

Rainfly: PU-coated, UV-resistant, flame retardant ripstop polyester with double taped seams

Canopy: UV-resistant, flame retardant ripstop polyester and No-See-Um netting
Floor: PU-coated, taffeta nylon
Poles: DAC Featherlight NSL 9.6 mm TH72M aircraft graade aluminium
Packed size:
24x10’’ / 60x26 cm
Setup time:
6 minutes
Colors:
Terracotta

 

exped-pegasus-tent.jpg

 

http://www.exped.com/exped/web/exped_homepage_int.nsf/0/1583D54809CB9F4AC125699A00650BCE?opendocument

1:27 a.m. on November 30, 2011 (EST)
1,631 reviewer rep
3,962 forum posts

Brian, that 2nd model reminds me of the Force Tens we were chatting about a bit back with the snowskirt at the base of the tent.

3:53 a.m. on November 30, 2011 (EST)
0 reviewer rep
1,237 forum posts

Rick-Pittsburgh:

 

 

 

Here are the two Vango force ten's that we were talking about a while back.

 

the 3 Man Spindrift:
force-10-spindrift.jpg

Flysheet: Protex® SPU 5000 ripstop nylonFlysheet
Inner: 70D ripstop polyester
Groundsheet: HD polyester 8000
Snow valance: HD polyester 8000
Poles: F10 Flexlite ø9.5mm + TBS® Pro
Pitching: ‘As one’ or flysheet first

• Protex® SPU 5000 ripstop nylon
• 70D ripstop polyester inner
• HD polyester 8000 groundsheet
• F10 Flexlite poles ø9.5mm
• TBS® Pro – Tension Band System
• Flat pole sleeves
• Full geodesic construction
• Full snow valances
• Ski compatible peg points
• Line-lok guyline runners
• Front and rear flysheet doors
• Gear loft
• Inner tent pockets
• Multiple reflective points
• ‘O’ shaped inner doors
• Rain stop flysheet door
• Flysheet door can be opened as a vent
• Flysheet vents closable from inner

Capacity: 3 person
Trail weight: 5.65kg
Total weight: 5.85kg
Pack size: 51 x ø20cm
Pitching time: 20 mins

 

and the 5 man Sentinel:


Vango-force-10-sentinel.jpg


Flysheet: Protex® SPU 5000 ripstop Inner: 70D ripstop polyester nylon 
Groundsheet: HD polyester 8000
Snow valance: HD polyester 8000
Poles: F10 Flexlite ø11mm + TBS® Pro
Pitching: ‘As one’ or flysheet first

• Protex® SPU 5000 ripstop nylon
• 70D ripstop polyester inner
• HD polyester 8000 groundsheet
• F10 Flexlite poles ø11mm
• TBS® Pro – Tension Band System
• Flat pole sleeves
• Full geodesic construction
• Full snow valances
• Vertical zip on flysheet door
• Ski compatible peg points
• Line-lok guyline runners
• Front and rear flysheet doors
• Gear loft
• Inner tent pockets
• Multiple reflective points
• ‘O’ shaped inner doors
• Rain stop flysheet door
• Flysheet door can be opened as a vent
• Flysheet vents closable from inner

Capacity: 5 person
Total weight: 8.70kg
Pack size: 59 x ø24cm
Pitching time: 20 mins

 

I haven't gotten any prices on Vango force 10's yet but I'm puttin money down that their mighty expensive since there current models.

With the exped tents the Polaris(the yellow one) was amde in 2005 and the Pegasus was made in 2007.  Since these are a few years old it's about time that there fgoing to be out there for more resonable prices than the Vango force 10's.

I'm looking at the Polaris at the moment.

7:03 p.m. on November 30, 2011 (EST)
9 reviewer rep
119 forum posts

Those are sick looking tents....

7:17 p.m. on November 30, 2011 (EST)
1,631 reviewer rep
3,962 forum posts

Brian what was the tent we looked at before that had the vents in the side? Was it the Force Ten or the Ferrino High Labs? I can't remember.

So many tents, not enough brain cells...

10:47 p.m. on November 30, 2011 (EST)
TOP 25 REVIEWER REVIEW CORPS
708 reviewer rep
908 forum posts

Hi Brian, I've had a Venus II for almost ten years now. I find it a very well thought out tent and well made. It is a tunnel design, which is common among European tents, though the Venus has an additional pole which makes it free standing. Set up and take down are fairly easy. On my tent, the sleeves are only color coded at the ends, so if you mistakenly go to the wrong end, it is obvious, but it is only a small strip of yellow, so in the dark you have a 50 percent chance of getting it right. Ventilation is good and having two doors and large vestibules for each door is a plus. The toggles that hold the doors rolled back work well, though I think that NEMO's system of using cord locks makes it easier to fasten when your fingers are cold. The bath tub floor is one of the heaviest in the business. Some condensation is to be expected in very wet conditions, and will eventually go from the fly to the inside of the tent. I especially am a fan of the tent and fly going up as one unit. This follows the European style tents. When it is very wet, and in the NW it can often be wet, going up with the fly on the tent is an advantage. Exped was founded and is run by a very nice German couple who sold retail, but thought that they could do better than many of their suppliers in the design department. I would buy one of their tents again.

6:47 a.m. on December 1, 2011 (EST)
0 reviewer rep
1,237 forum posts

Rick-Pittsburgh said:

Brian what was the tent we looked at before that had the vents in the side? Was it the Force Ten or the Ferrino High Labs? I can't remember.

So many tents, not enough brain cells...

 Yep they were Ferrino High Labs:

Here's a sampling:


EXPE_99104Q_1.jpg

 


Ferrino-tnets.jpg

 


SNOWBOUND-202_99098R_4.jpg

 

And one of my favorites:


COLLE-20SUD_99094_1.jpg

But there all pretty cool.  So many tnts so little time.............

 

Here is their full line of tents.  Yet again some find lookin tents.

http://www.ferrino.it/en/homepage/products/TENTS/high_lab_114


6:59 a.m. on December 1, 2011 (EST)
0 reviewer rep
1,237 forum posts

Erich said:

Hi Brian, I've had a Venus II for almost ten years now. I find it a very well thought out tent and well made. It is a tunnel design, which is common among European tents, though the Venus has an additional pole which makes it free standing. Set up and take down are fairly easy. On my tent, the sleeves are only color coded at the ends, so if you mistakenly go to the wrong end, it is obvious, but it is only a small strip of yellow, so in the dark you have a 50 percent chance of getting it right. Ventilation is good and having two doors and large vestibules for each door is a plus. The toggles that hold the doors rolled back work well, though I think that NEMO's system of using cord locks makes it easier to fasten when your fingers are cold. The bath tub floor is one of the heaviest in the business. Some condensation is to be expected in very wet conditions, and will eventually go from the fly to the inside of the tent. I especially am a fan of the tent and fly going up as one unit. This follows the European style tents. When it is very wet, and in the NW it can often be wet, going up with the fly on the tent is an advantage. Exped was founded and is run by a very nice German couple who sold retail, but thought that they could do better than many of their suppliers in the design department. I would buy one of their tents again.

Erich, thanks for letting me know about your tent.  As with most tents from Europe with the exception of Hilliebergs there is not much info on them on this side of the pond.  I aim to change that.  Slowely but I hope shurly.  It seems that Exped only puts out one tent a year and only for that year which makes them rather rare.  At least that's the way it seems from my investigation so far.  Again thanks for sharing.

2:37 p.m. on December 1, 2011 (EST)
1,631 reviewer rep
3,962 forum posts

Brian, that last Ferrino tent looks like a hardhat or a raincap. 

7:39 p.m. on December 1, 2011 (EST)
TOP 25 REVIEWER REVIEW CORPS
708 reviewer rep
908 forum posts

Fjallraven also makes some good tents.

http://www.fjallraven.com/outdoor-equipment/tents/

Unfortunately, many European tents are not available in NA because of fire retardant issues. A number of states, as well as Canada, require tent materials to be treated with a fire retardant. This is one reason why a number of European companies chose not to distribute tents here. They can't sell nationally. As well, this is why breathable fabric tents are so rare here, and most of the ones that are here, don't breathe as well as they could or perhaps used to. A notable exception is Integral Designs, which, though they are a Canadian company, can't sell their breathable tents in Canada, and why they only sell breathable tents in the US in a limited number of states.

10:36 p.m. on December 1, 2011 (EST)
2 reviewer rep
89 forum posts

Mike Horn used Ferrino on his 2 year, solo arctic circle circumnavigation.  His life depended on them for sure.  Although his was custom built, I believe Ferrino to be on par with Hilleberg.

10:42 p.m. on December 1, 2011 (EST)
1,631 reviewer rep
3,962 forum posts

Messner used the Ferrinos as well.

http://www.ferrino.it/it/homepage/company/history

The Ferrinos can be exported as well. I had a guy contact me awhile back in regards to them from an inquiry I placed with them. 

10:51 p.m. on December 1, 2011 (EST)
0 reviewer rep
1,237 forum posts

Erich said:

Fjallraven also makes some good tents.

http://www.fjallraven.com/outdoor-equipment/tents/

Unfortunately, many European tents are not available in NA because of fire retardant issues. A number of states, as well as Canada, require tent materials to be treated with a fire retardant. This is one reason why a number of European companies chose not to distribute tents here. They can't sell nationally. As well, this is why breathable fabric tents are so rare here, and most of the ones that are here, don't breathe as well as they could or perhaps used to. A notable exception is Integral Designs, which, though they are a Canadian company, can't sell their breathable tents in Canada, and why they only sell breathable tents in the US in a limited number of states.

 

That is one of the dumbest things I have ever heard of. I know it true, But still really freakin stupid. I burned a tent down once. It had the fire retardant in/on it. It made the napalm mess burn exactly 2 seconds slower than if it had not had the fire retardant in/on it. The guys/gals who make up these stupid rules and laws have never burned a tent down themselves. Don't make me find loop holes to get the tents I want.............don't..........can you say EBay.

10:58 p.m. on December 1, 2011 (EST)
0 reviewer rep
1,237 forum posts

Patriot said:

Mike Horn used Ferrino on his 2 year, solo arctic circle circumnavigation.  His life depended on them for sure.  Although his was custom built, I believe Ferrino to be on par with Hilleberg.

I believe your are correct in that assumption. As well as Vango Force 10's and Exped's and who ever else out there can find me some fine tents. The only place that is missing truly fine tents is America. Truly sad. But I will not lament. As I will have the finest tents the world has to offer. This country can do what ever it want's.

11:25 p.m. on December 1, 2011 (EST)
REVIEW CORPS
1,195 reviewer rep
1,069 forum posts

So, since we're on the subject of tents we can't easily have, I feel I must mention Helsport...

http://www.helsport.no/en/HOME/

Word on the street is, for the worst of the worst conditions, their "X-Trem" line can't be beat. As in there is no better commercially-produced tent for extreme "winter" conditions. I have not used one, but I've been recently looking at getting a Tipi, and I would love to spend some time in a Finnmark.

12:51 a.m. on December 2, 2011 (EST)
REVIEW CORPS
1,245 reviewer rep
1,270 forum posts

re: Helsport ... I wouldn't buy it on the general principle that their website promotes camping less than 2 feet from the lake :).

1:12 a.m. on December 2, 2011 (EST)
0 reviewer rep
1,237 forum posts

bheiser1 said:

re: Helsport ... I wouldn't buy it on the general principle that their website promotes camping less than 2 feet from the lake :).

It that a lake or a river?  I don't know how it is where you live but up here in Washington if the camp sites are on the river, litterely on the 2 feet from the river, that's where you camp. If you don't, you get a ticket and get kicked out.

I looks to me like they set up by a body of water as I don't see any assocatated peices of gear laying about so that they could get a pretty picture.  Was this picture taken in the US were we have decided that is the rule (the 50ft rule) or somewhere else in the world where this is not the decided norm? 

1:14 a.m. on December 2, 2011 (EST)
0 reviewer rep
1,237 forum posts

pillowthread said:

So, since we're on the subject of tents we can't easily have, I feel I must mention Helsport...

http://www.helsport.no/en/HOME/

Word on the street is, for the worst of the worst conditions, their "X-Trem" line can't be beat. As in there is no better commercially-produced tent for extreme "winter" conditions. I have not used one, but I've been recently looking at getting a Tipi, and I would love to spend some time in a Finnmark.

Thanks pillow, duly noted. They do look a lot at first glance like the Stephenson/Warmlite tents, or maybe the other way around.

.

1:25 a.m. on December 2, 2011 (EST)
REVIEW CORPS
1,245 reviewer rep
1,270 forum posts

apeman said:

bheiser1 said:

re: Helsport ... I wouldn't buy it on the general principle that their website promotes camping less than 2 feet from the lake :).

It that a lake or a river?  I don't know how it is where you live but up here in Washington if the camp sites are on the river, litterely on the 2 feet from the river, that's where you camp. If you don't, you get a ticket and get kicked out.

I looks to me like they set up by a body of water as I don't see any assocatated peices of gear laying about so that they could get a pretty picture.  Was this picture taken in the US were we have decided that is the rule (the 50ft rule) or somewhere else in the world where this is not the decided norm? 

Oh wow ... yeah I guess I'm just used to the Sierra, where the general rule is at least 100ft off trail and away from any body of water.  But even there of course there are sites adjacent to water & trails, but they're not legal.

Sorry to the OP for the off-topic comment...

9:30 a.m. on December 2, 2011 (EST)
102 reviewer rep
2,295 forum posts

apeman said:

I"m intereested in Exped tents and have been for  a long time.  Do aany of you have any experiances with them or know of anyone wh does or has. 

What drives your interest?  Is this a gear freak facination, or do you have a specific application you are trying to adress?

Ed

2:07 p.m. on December 2, 2011 (EST)
TOP 25 REVIEWER REVIEW CORPS
708 reviewer rep
908 forum posts

bheiser1 said:

re: Helsport ... I wouldn't buy it on the general principle that their website promotes camping less than 2 feet from the lake :).

 I guess this qualifies as being less than 2 feet from the water. Literally, there was no other level ground  and I spent two nights there while our group portaged canoes and gear. The others were not so lucky, they slept under logs with tarps or rain flys.


IMGP1350.jpg
Brian, you bring up a good point about fire retardant tents. They still burn, but they burn more slowly. The rule supposes that once a tent catches fire, the occupants will have more time to exit. The difference in time is fairly minimal and who, pray, is going to hang inside a tent that is on fire?

5:47 p.m. on December 2, 2011 (EST)
0 reviewer rep
1,237 forum posts

whomeworry said:

apeman said:

I"m intereested in Exped tents and have been for  a long time.  Do aany of you have any experiances with them or know of anyone wh does or has. 

What drives your interest?  Is this a gear freak facination, or do you have a specific application you are trying to adress?

Ed

I am for what ever reason fascinated by the fact that man can take a few pounds of materials and in different ways make incredible shelters that can keep him/her alive in the worst of conditions. As I have just recently discovered the European tents, it has opened up a whole new apparently endless supply of what I believe to be incredible tent engineering that I was unaware of being made. Many of these tents are made in the manner of making tents that I hve thought about over the years and now I get to see what I‘ve been thinking about in real time not just in my head. Along with the fact that I used my TNF Ring OI for 25 years. As it lasted so long there was really no sense in looking at other tents. Then when I finally wore it from a 4 season tent into a 3 season tent (it needs a new floor) and looking again at tents I've seen how far they have come, as well as how off track some of these shelter can be made. So, to answer your question, yes I am a gear freak, mainly in the genre of tents and yes I like the different applications of how one can combine different materials in there uses in regards to double wall and or single wall tents to achieve the goals that one what's to achieve. I also very much respect and am moved by what I consider how some of these tents are in my minds eye great pieces of art. There a bit cheaper than a Van Gough.

So in the end I 'm just a tent junkie, but I do have a preferred tent of choice. that being the larger base camp geodesic dome tents that are free standing. But my interests extend in other directions such as the older Garuda’s as well.

 

 

5:50 p.m. on December 2, 2011 (EST)
0 reviewer rep
1,237 forum posts

bheiser1 said:

apeman said:

bheiser1 said:

re: Helsport ... I wouldn't buy it on the general principle that their website promotes camping less than 2 feet from the lake :).

It that a lake or a river?  I don't know how it is where you live but up here in Washington if the camp sites are on the river, litterely on the 2 feet from the river, that's where you camp. If you don't, you get a ticket and get kicked out.

I looks to me like they set up by a body of water as I don't see any assocatated peices of gear laying about so that they could get a pretty picture.  Was this picture taken in the US were we have decided that is the rule (the 50ft rule) or somewhere else in the world where this is not the decided norm? 

Oh wow ... yeah I guess I'm just used to the Sierra, where the general rule is at least 100ft off trail and away from any body of water.  But even there of course there are sites adjacent to water & trails, but they're not legal.

Sorry to the OP for the off-topic comment...

 

No needs for apologies as the OP has determined that you are still on-topic in regards to your comments

.

6:08 p.m. on December 2, 2011 (EST)
0 reviewer rep
1,237 forum posts

Erich said:

bheiser1 said:

re: Helsport ... I wouldn't buy it on the general principle that their website promotes camping less than 2 feet from the lake :).

 I guess this qualifies as being less than 2 feet from the water. Literally, there was no other level ground  and I spent two nights there while our group portaged canoes and gear. The others were not so lucky, they slept under logs with tarps or rain flys.


IMGP1350.jpg
Brian, you bring up a good point about fire retardant tents. They still burn, but they burn more slowly. The rule supposes that once a tent catches fire, the occupants will have more time to exit. The difference in time is fairly minimal and who, pray, is going to hang inside a tent that is on fire?

I understand what they were "trying" to do by passing legislation in regards to the burning of tent’s and moving from non retardant to now fire retardant tent's, but I truly believe that it makes no difference. If you would have seen what I had seen when I burned my TNF Himalayan Hotel down I think you have agreed it would have made no difference. It still went up so fast that I believe that If I would have been in the tent at the time I would have died a slow horrible death after everyone around put me out or that I would have wish that it would have ended there. The fire was fast and ferocious, lucky for me the woods were overly wet or the entire forest would have burned down. A lot of quality beer was wasted putting out that fire. I lost well over $3000 worth of gear, I stopped counting at the $3000 mark as it just got to painful. Lesson learned. Don't burn your tent down. There is a thread going in which people had to ditch their gear and another thread "That was a rough one..." . That is my story that falls between the two, just in a different thread.

By the way I know you've shown that picture before and it's just to cool. I'm assuming that's your Exped. That is the art of which I just spoke of, Man's art surrounded by natures art both seemly fully engaged with each other but in what appears to be complete harmony. I only wish I could say that I had taken that picture of my tent and had the honor of spending the night in that spot. I'm envious of your experience.

8:16 p.m. on December 2, 2011 (EST)
102 reviewer rep
2,295 forum posts

apeman said:

whomeworry said:

What drives your interest?  Is this a gear freak facination, or do you have a specific application you are trying to adress?

Ed

I am for what ever reason fascinated by the fact that man can take a few pounds of materials and in different ways make incredible shelters that can keep him/her alive in the worst of conditions...

..I used my TNF Ring OI for 25 years. As it lasted so long there was really no sense in looking at other tents...

So in the end I 'm just a tent junkie... 

I have only participated in alpine style "expeditions", so large "exped" tents were never part of our camp.  I have seen these team tents in the field, such as Denali and various Casscade mountains of the PNW.  They are not as storm worthy as their smaller 2-3 person cousins (e.g. TNF VE25 versus TNF Oval Intention) if for no other reason they present larger profiles to the wind.  I have used the VE25 and its predecessor for decades, but the low ceiling and heavy weight per person has something to be desired.  Likewise I consider the interior a little on the dark side.  I have also used the BD megamid.  I like the light weight feature, and it is a good winter weather tent, but it is confining due to the sloping walls, unless pitched over a trench dug to extend head room.  Given the options available today, there no reason to make such compromises.

On the other hand I frequently have done winter base camp style ski trips in the Sierras during March and April, where camp was generally set up below 11K'.  The tent of choice on these trips has been an old REI Dome 4.  We liked the (almost) standing headroom, and the off white tent and fly made for a bright interior.  The steep sidewalls makes it a very roomy 4 sleep if backpacks are kept outside (does not have a vestibule), or a very roomy 3 sleep with gear inside.  Alas the REI dome 4 is a 3 season tent, and we were too poor to afford a good 4 season big tent.  Poor yes, but resourceful.  We beefed up this tent, replacing the fly with one made from heavier but unsealed fabric - it doesn’t rain up there that time of year.  The seams and stress points of the fly were reinforced, and the fly extended it to the ground to prevent spindrift invasion.  Shock cord tie downs at each corner of the fly were replaced with tie downs that didn’t stretch.  The tie downs were designed to positively attach to the base of the poles.  The new fly was designed to permit attaching guy lines directly to the tent poles.  Effectively the fly replaced the tent as the fabric element that bore most of the forces of any wind and snow.  It is amazingly strong, and quiet in the wind for a tent its size.  The combination of an unsealed fly and additional vents installed on the tent eliminate most condensation issues.  These mods brought the tent weight up to 14 pounds; not bad for a 4 sleep, given it dates from the early 1980s.  It has seen gusts up to 60mph and sustained winds in the 45mph range.  I have no reason to replace it after close to 150 days in the field over the decades.   That said, I would not use this tent or any large exped tent as a mission critical shelter in venues where higher winds are anticipated.

Ed

8:42 p.m. on December 2, 2011 (EST)
0 reviewer rep
1,237 forum posts

whomeworry said:

apeman said:

whomeworry said:

What drives your interest?  Is this a gear freak facination, or do you have a specific application you are trying to adress?

Ed

I am for what ever reason fascinated by the fact that man can take a few pounds of materials and in different ways make incredible shelters that can keep him/her alive in the worst of conditions...

..I used my TNF Ring OI for 25 years. As it lasted so long there was really no sense in looking at other tents...

So in the end I 'm just a tent junkie... 

I have only participated in alpine style "expeditions", so large "exped" tents were never part of our camp.  I have seen these team tents in the field, such as Denali and various Casscade mountains of the PNW.  They are not as storm worthy as their smaller 2-3 person cousins (e.g. TNF VE25 versus TNF Oval Intention) if for no other reason they present larger profiles to the wind.  I have used the VE25 and its predecessor for decades, but the low ceiling and heavy weight per person has something to be desired.  Likewise I consider the interior a little on the dark side.  I have also used the BD megamid.  I like the light weight feature, and it is a good winter weather tent, but it is confining due to the sloping walls, unless pitched over a trench dug to extend head room.  Given the options available today, there no reason to make such compromises.

On the other hand I frequently have done winter base camp style ski trips in the Sierras during March and April, where camp was generally set up below 11K'.  The tent of choice on these trips has been an old REI Dome 4.  We liked the (almost) standing headroom, and the off white tent and fly made for a bright interior.  The steep sidewalls makes it a very roomy 4 sleep if backpacks are kept outside (does not have a vestibule), or a very roomy 3 sleep with gear inside.  Alas the REI dome 4 is a 3 season tent, and we were too poor to afford a good 4 season big tent.  Poor yes, but resourceful.  We beefed up this tent, replacing the fly with one made from heavier but unsealed fabric - it doesn’t rain up there that time of year.  The seams and stress points of the fly were reinforced, and the fly extended it to the ground to prevent spindrift invasion.  Shock cord tie downs at each corner of the fly were replaced with tie downs that didn’t stretch.  The tie downs were designed to positively attach to the base of the poles.  The new fly was designed to permit attaching guy lines directly to the tent poles.  Effectively the fly replaced the tent as the fabric element that bore most of the forces of any wind and snow.  It is amazingly strong, and quiet in the wind for a tent its size.  The combination of an unsealed fly and additional vents installed on the tent eliminate most condensation issues.  These mods brought the tent weight up to 14 pounds; not bad for a 4 sleep, given it dates from the early 1980s.  It has seen gusts up to 60mph and sustained winds in the 45mph range.  I have no reason to replace it after close to 150 days in the field over the decades.   That said, I would not use this tent or any large exped tent as a mission critical shelter in venues where higher winds are anticipated.

Ed

"The combination of an unsealed fly and additional vents installed on the tent eliminate most condensation issues.'

Bingo proper venting………., venting ,venting, venting…….it‘s just so simple. It really does not take a lot of money to think up a good tent that does everything well.

It is amazing what one can do with just a bit of recourses and a few minds that are on the same page.

When living at high elevation with other persons 14 pounds seems pretty light to me. I agree that the lower the profile of the tent the less stress, with that beings said they have made some big tents that can handle the big weather. The MH DW Satellite (10 poles) the MH single wall Satellite (10 poles), the MH Stronghold 10 person 15 poles, the TNF Two meter Dome, THF Dome 8, TNF dome 5. There are others but those are the ones I trust for now. I have some of them, but not all. All the big heavy tents of which I speak of are way unsuitable for most on this site other than me and I do realize that. I will forgo much to pack a bigger tent and or make a second trip due to the way I camp and backpack to have these tents. I would rather have these tents then cell phones, computers, cameras, and a whole host of there junk etc. I do know I am not the norm, as has always been the case in my life. But statistics say at least a few of the sheep must stray from the flock. They sometimes find it very hard to round me up and I get really annoyed when they do.

4:17 p.m. on December 3, 2011 (EST)
TOP 25 REVIEWER REVIEW CORPS
708 reviewer rep
908 forum posts

Brian, that tent is not an Exped, but a NEMO Morpho 1P. Ed, I think there might be some confusion. Brian was asking about Exped brand tents, rather than expedition tents. My Venus is definitely small enough to be considered for alpine style climbs, though I would personally prefer and used an Impotent for many years because of the smaller footprint.

4:52 p.m. on December 3, 2011 (EST)
0 reviewer rep
1,237 forum posts

Erich said:

Brian, that tent is not an Exped, but a NEMO Morpho 1P. Ed, I think there might be some confusion. Brian was asking about Exped brand tents, rather than expedition tents. My Venus is definitely small enough to be considered for alpine style climbs, though I would personally prefer and used an Impotent for many years because of the smaller footprint.

 

I think things got off track a bit when Ed above asked, in a kind way, if I was a little off my rocker by being fascinated by the Exped tent line when most know the amount and kind of tents that I have. In my response I explained that I was mostly drawn to Expedition style geodesic freestanding 4+man tents.  With that beings said and reviewing his question I woud guess that I am a little off my rocker.  But no more so than the stamp or coin collector that has 100,000 items in their collections.  I only have 50

Erich: As I would have expected there are not many here at Trailspace that have had or used Exped tents and was in fact surprised that you have had one for so long. I would guess that as you stated due to the fact that they would not make their tents to our fire retardant specs along with the fact that Americans are brand namers, makes it much harder for a new product to make it to the American market. I'm glad I found at least one here that has expeirances with Exped, and that you that have had good experiences with them as well.  I would have expected that mearly because they are a European tent maker and they truly take pride in the products they make.IMHO

Interestingly enough I've heard nothing bad about any Euro tent though there is much less reviews printed about them as well. Yet again I will go American bashing (believing that it's well deserved) and say that Europe seems to be making excellent products while America quite often makes at best mediocre products and one must literally sift thru the trash to find the good products. Another interesting thing is that when you get into the price range of the European tents the American tents are of price are of similar quality except for venting. It seems that, and it makes sense to me, that it's the lower priced tents that are just being thrown out on the American market as a high percentage of American buyers buy cause it just looks cool, is convenient, they just to spend money, etc . That is a wide net to cast.  I feel that most on Trailspace are here because they love the outdoors and part of that is by investigating the gear they buy and use to due that with. With that being said we are a very small part of the American population percentage wise. If you look at the European tents vs. the American tents on the cheaper end of the scale their is just no comparison at all. The Euro zone wins that cage match hands down. As Rick noted at some point for those in Europe to find truly light tents they quite often come to the America market to find the products that are the least robust thereby being the lightest tents.

12:56 a.m. on December 4, 2011 (EST)
TOP 25 REVIEWER REVIEW CORPS
708 reviewer rep
908 forum posts

Brian, there are often products that are not commonly available in NA today, and so are relatively unknown. So to there are products that don't cross over from other disciplines, so they are unknown, in a relative way. A few years ago, I came across,  a "new" MSR tent. I thought, that looks a lot like a Whelen tent, but made in lightweight materials.

whelen.jpg

And the "new" design from MSR. Modern materials, some additional features(which were also added to Whelens over the years by various companies.

Essential_Series.jpg

1:18 a.m. on December 4, 2011 (EST)
102 reviewer rep
2,295 forum posts

Erich said:

Brian, that tent is not an Exped, but a NEMO Morpho 1P. Ed, I think there might be some confusion. Brian was asking about Exped brand tents, rather than expedition tents...

Yes, I was unaware of the Exped brand, assuming that was an abbreviation for expedition.  Sorry for the red herring.

Ed

9:26 p.m. on December 30, 2011 (EST)
0 reviewer rep
2 forum posts

You can say that again, about too many tents, not enough TIME - I too am quickly becoming aware of the care in design Exped takes with their tents.  I could care less about fire retardant, but AM interested in the excellent oversize vestibule on the Vango Spirit 200+, Omega 250, and the Exped Andromeda II - anyone have a better brand that includes this type of vestibule, or a preference in these 2 brands?   Desire is to keep it as light as possible for one person kayak/cycling with trailer - THANKS!

-beth

9:59 p.m. on December 30, 2011 (EST)
TOP 10 REVIEWER REVIEW CORPS
2,329 reviewer rep
5,295 forum posts

Maribeth,

Welcome to Trailspace. However, I am curious why you chose the "Still Camping over 50" name.  Two of the posters in this thread so far are well over 50. And a number of regulars on the site are also well over 50, including one lady who is soon to be trekking in Nepal to Everest Base Camp.

Remember, "50 is the new 20" {8=>D

12:43 a.m. on December 31, 2011 (EST)
RETAILER
8 reviewer rep
210 forum posts

Bill S said:

Maribeth,

Welcome to Trailspace. However, I am curious why you chose the "Still Camping over 50" name.  Two of the posters in this thread so far are well over 50. And a number of regulars on the site are also well over 50, including one lady who is soon to be trekking in Nepal to Everest Base Camp.

Remember, "50 is the new 20" {8=>D

 Count me in!  54 yrs old and still kickin'

12:58 a.m. on December 31, 2011 (EST)
2 reviewer rep
692 forum posts

vigilguy said:

Bill S said:

Maribeth,

Welcome to Trailspace. However, I am curious why you chose the "Still Camping over 50" name.  Two of the posters in this thread so far are well over 50. And a number of regulars on the site are also well over 50, including one lady who is soon to be trekking in Nepal to Everest Base Camp.

Remember, "50 is the new 20" {8=>D

 Count me in!  54 yrs old and still kickin'

 With the strength and power of a 24 year old.  Yo!

3:08 p.m. on January 8, 2012 (EST)
0 reviewer rep
2 forum posts

Ha - that is great - 50 is the new 20 - then what is 58?  Ha -- thank you for the grin - I don't know why I chose that name - really would rather not take a separate one, but everyone seems to - most likely the name comes from fewer and fewer friends interested in sleeping on the ground!   Any opinion about tent brands?   Want large vestibule, light weight and now learning about silicone treated fabric, and wonder if anyone is competing with Hilleberg?   Anyone love their Exped Andromeda II?

September 18, 2014
Quick Reply

Please sign in to reply

 
More Topics
This forum: Older: Kicksledding with kids? Newer: Vintage Day's Ranger jacket
All forums: Older: You're the Designer: Outdoor Companies Turn to Customers for New Product Ideas Newer: The North Face's first mountaineering boot (really)