I dare you not to laugh!

9:59 p.m. on February 6, 2012 (EST)
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strange-tent.jpg

Can identify this tent?

Anybody want to give it a nickname?

1:17 a.m. on February 7, 2012 (EST)
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WTF?!  No, seriously, WTF?!

5:19 a.m. on February 7, 2012 (EST)
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Sphincter Tent!

7:28 a.m. on February 7, 2012 (EST)
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That strange entrance is a snow tunnel.  It was once a not uncommon design of four season tents up to the 1980s.

Looks like an old Eddie Bower mountaineer tent.

Ed

10:27 a.m. on February 7, 2012 (EST)
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I dont know what tent it is but as whomeworry said, I used to have a VE24 TNF tent that had a snow tunnel entrance like that on one end. I never used it, it also had a regular zippered entrance.

12:16 p.m. on February 7, 2012 (EST)
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I feel dirty just looking at it.

6:52 p.m. on February 7, 2012 (EST)
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Dang, them hippies and their funny ways!! 

:D

8:11 p.m. on February 7, 2012 (EST)
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How is the snow tunnel used? 

8:41 p.m. on February 7, 2012 (EST)
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It is indeed a snow tunnel, but not the Bauer or Gerry Himalayan tents. Before dome/geodesic tents and large vestibules, you didn't want to just unzip the whole end of the tent in a storm. So they had these snow tunnels. Basically, you open the entrance enough to slip inside, and sort of put it on. The entry would act as a cleaner to get a lot of the snow (or wet rain) off, keeping the inside of the tent somewhat drier.

I once spent 3 days holed up in a Gerry Himalayan in Red's Meadows. My partners and I had intended to climb Ritter and Banner during the Christmas break, so had snowshoed over the pass (Minaret Summit) from Mammoth. We got caught in a blizzard that, according to the climatological records is still among the highest long-duration snow dumps in the Sierra. When things let up after 3 days, it let up enough that we decided to just bail. We had been getting out every 3 or 4 hours to clear the tent of snow, so were in a pit with piles of snow around us higher than the tent. Took a full day to get back up over the pass, then another half day to get back to the car. When we checked back in with the rangers, they said they figured we were well prepared (which we were), so they weren't worried.

The Gerry design was really good. The main tent had snow flaps to supplement the pegs and guys. The middle between the A-frame poles had 2 sets of fiberglass wands to bow out the middle of the tent. There was a vestibule with a 6 inch "wall" to separate it from the main floor, which had a zip-open hole in the floor at each end of the tent. One was for collecting snow for water, the other for disposing of "waste". One end had a large zip-open door, the other a snow tunnel sleeve. Inside the tent was a "frost liner", a cotton inner tent that hung a few inches inside the outer tent. Sort of like the inner tents that Hilleberg has standard these days. You can see a couple of photos here, and here.

Some people seem to have a mind that sees prurient and scatological images in anything.

9:26 p.m. on February 7, 2012 (EST)
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Reminds me of the second Ace Ventura movie.  Remember the motorized Rhino?

11:58 p.m. on February 7, 2012 (EST)
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Look out for hemorrhoids!

1:47 a.m. on February 8, 2012 (EST)
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Dare me not to laugh? I actually started to get a little heart sick. My first expedition tent was an Expedition Crestline, an REI tent. This one isn't that as mine was blue and yellow. Sold it about the time I got my Bibler Impotent, about 1975. The tunnel worked well for what it was designed for. It was a good basecamp tent, though heavy. I actually miss tents with the tunnels when I am in snow. Also miss the zip open floors and chimneys for cooking inside, although they don't pass fire code today! I have fond memories of that tent and the time I spent in it.

3:18 a.m. on February 8, 2012 (EST)
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The Chocolate Starfish!

8:41 a.m. on February 8, 2012 (EST)
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Bill S said: Basically, you open the entrance enough to slip inside, and sort of put it on. The entry would act as a cleaner to get a lot of the snow (or wet rain) off, keeping the inside of the tent somewhat drier.

 

And you could open them all the way up and tie off the edges of the cicle hole to make a large entrance. The VE24 I had, had two entrance snow tunnels on one end. And the regular zippered half circuluar door on the other.

4:05 a.m. on February 9, 2012 (EST)
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Bill S said:

..I once spent 3 days holed up in a Gerry Himalayan in Red's Meadows. My partners and I had intended to climb Ritter and Banner during the Christmas break.. ..We got caught in a blizzard that, according to the climatological records is still among the highest long-duration snow dumps in the Sierra...

When was this?  The worst storm plagued trip I had in the Sierras was late December 83 to mid January 84, doing a high route variation.  We witness only about six hours of clear skies over an 18 day period; the rest of the time we were getting dumped on or blasted with ground effect blizzards.  This was not a good season for us; we got pinned down for over a week in a high camp the previous fall, climbing in the Cordillera Blanca, barely escaping near disaster.   The spring of 84 brought the El Niño storms that wiped out the piers all along the California coast line.  I remember it all too well…

Ed

4:43 a.m. on February 9, 2012 (EST)
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I think the basic idea goes back a ways:


p99-13-8-41-img.jpg

That would be Robert Falcon Scott with his head out the sphincter (literally, figuratively is still up for debate).

Here's a modern re-creation of the design:


v0_master.jpg


7:48 p.m. on February 9, 2012 (EST)
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BigRed said:


v0_master.jpg

 Cool tent, who makes it?

Ed

1:42 p.m. on February 10, 2012 (EST)
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That reminds me of a tent Sierra Designs made back in the 70s. Don't remember the name or model number. Had a door at one end, snow tunnel at the other. I never needed one; they were meant for far more serious gear geeks than me.

7:33 p.m. on February 13, 2012 (EST)
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Oh man........

9:32 p.m. on February 13, 2012 (EST)
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awesome thread

6:51 p.m. on February 15, 2012 (EST)
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what

9:31 p.m. on February 15, 2012 (EST)
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I believe I would have to stay in the tent til dark for fear of someone taking my picture as I stuck my head out.

4:17 p.m. on February 27, 2012 (EST)
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This A-frame tent is a copy of the US Army 10th Mountain Division tents which were reversable -  green on one side and white on the other. My Boy Scout troop used suplus 10th Mountain Div. tents in the 1950s and we thought we had the best tents ever, which they were for that day.

5:35 p.m. on February 28, 2012 (EST)
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you were right!

July 23, 2014
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