Deuter Speed PAck for summit day on Shasta

9:42 p.m. on June 29, 2012 (EDT)
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My bro is going to climb Shasta end of July. He is looking to get a summit day pack that is light, will hold water and a few other things for the summit run. This Deuter Speed Pack 20  has not been reviewed...any thoughts?

1:18 p.m. on June 30, 2012 (EDT)
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great

1:32 p.m. on June 30, 2012 (EDT)
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Deuter makes good packs however, if you are looking for alternatives take a look at the CamelBak line.  I've got a Fourteener, it's well made and comes with a hydration bladder.  If you don't want a "shovel pocket" the Rim Runner is very close in size and fit.

2:00 p.m. on June 30, 2012 (EDT)
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Okay, I suppose I will offer a bit if input on the matter....

Callahan said:

great

How so? I am just curious as to why you say this is "great." What is "great?" I am just curious as to what you are basing your feedback on. 

The pack, the fact that Gifto's bro is gonna nail Shasta in July, so on, and so forth."

Onto the pack...

Here is a vid I dug up on the pack:

Deuter makes a great product. I have seen quite a few of their packs over the years and the quality is there from the feedback I have heard from friends that use them. 

Something that I noticed in the video is that the hipbelt(or lack of) for the pack itself is just webbing. Me personally(keep in mind this is my preference) I would like something just a little more robust in regards to a hipbelt for comfort. 

Personally, I would also suggest taking a look at Osprey's Stratos series. 

More rigid light alloy frame, better hipbelt(with dual pockets), awesome ventilation for the backpanel(should be appreciated in July,) hydration compatible, and has a trekking pole system that one can utilize w/o taking the pack off(you really don't have to even stop moving for that matter.)

You also get a rain cover with the initial purchase of the pack. 

I love my Stratos 26. I could go on and on about it but instead of making this a long drawn out post; here is my review:

http://www.trailspace.com/gear/osprey/stratos-26/#review24615

Just figured I would throw this one into the mix. 

5:03 p.m. on June 30, 2012 (EDT)
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Thanks, Rick. I have the Deuter Futuro Pro 42 that I took to Everest. LOVE it. Joe is looking to take a summit day pack that is light weight and efficient to hold plenty of water and just the other summit day items..camera, first aid, couple layers, hang the axe and the crampons......I am going to have him read this tonight when he gets back from the North Loop of Mount Charleston.

7:19 p.m. on June 30, 2012 (EDT)
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I could be wrong, but the pack looks like if provides minimal options for lashing on stuff like skis, crampons, axe, shovel, gear rack and rope.  I would want sturdy mounting points for all of these, for venues like Shasta.  Also 20 liters is about as small as I would go for a summit pack selected for this type of venue, provided I can stow the above mentioned items outside;  otherwise this pack is too small for my liking.

As for the waist strap, I don’t think a mesh band is an issue, since the waist strap on small packs is intended to stabilize movement of the load, and does not carry weight.  As long as the waist band holds the fast, it will fulfill its intended purpose.

Ed

7:39 p.m. on June 30, 2012 (EDT)
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Ed makes a good point in regards to the hipbelt on a pack of that size. I guess it really wouldn't be utilized so much for taking the load off the shoulders as it would be more geared towards stability. 

I have loaded my Stratos up and the hipbelt does take the load off the shoulders hence why it is a bit more robust. I can't say the Stratos lacks lash points so that shouldn't be a problem. 

Then again 25lbs isn't much of a load to me considering what I typically carry. 

Good mention Ed. 

8:06 p.m. on June 30, 2012 (EDT)
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whomeworry said:

I could be wrong, but the pack looks like if provides minimal options for lashing on stuff like skis, crampons, axe, shovel, gear rack and rope.  I would want sturdy mounting points for all of these, for venues like Shasta.  Also 20 liters is about as small as I would go for a summit pack selected for this type of venue, provided I can stow the above mentioned items outside;  otherwise this pack is too small for my liking.

As for the waist strap, I don’t think a mesh band is an issue, since the waist strap on small packs is intended to stabilize movement of the load, and does not carry weight.  As long as the waist band holds the fast, it will fulfill its intended purpose.

Ed

 Ed: He is being Guided by REI and he, himself, is not carrying rope. He will have his ax and crampons, stix for the lower portion of the hike. I will let him know. What would you carry on summit?

8:19 p.m. on June 30, 2012 (EDT)
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Osprey Argon 110. 

I just had too. :p

9:41 p.m. on June 30, 2012 (EDT)
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Rick-Pittsburgh said:

Osprey Argon 110. 

I just had too. :p

 That is way too big for summit day. That is as big as the pack he is taking or the entire trip.

9:49 p.m. on June 30, 2012 (EDT)
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See, by my logic he is already set. Just tell him to put in what he wants and make up the difference w/Helium balloons. ;)

10:12 a.m. on July 1, 2012 (EDT)
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HA HA!!! Looks like he is looking more at the Camelback sries right now. Is very concerned about carrying plenty of water. Lots of reports on Summit.com and the common thread for people getting in trouble is not taking enough water on summit day. THANKS!

5:19 a.m. on July 3, 2012 (EDT)
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giftogab said:

whomeworry said:

I could be wrong, but the pack looks like if provides minimal options for lashing on stuff like skis, crampons, axe, shovel, gear rack and rope.  I would want sturdy mounting points for all of these, for venues like Shasta.  Also 20 liters is about as small as I would go for a summit pack selected for this type of venue, provided I can stow the above mentioned items outside;  otherwise this pack is too small for my liking.

As for the waist strap, I don’t think a mesh band is an issue, since the waist strap on small packs is intended to stabilize movement of the load, and does not carry weight.  As long as the waist band holds the fast, it will fulfill its intended purpose.

Ed

 Ed: He is being Guided by REI and he, himself, is not carrying rope. He will have his ax and crampons, stix for the lower portion of the hike. I will let him know. What would you carry on summit?

 

Trips like this where snow and ice travel is required to get to camp, I normally go with an old school Wilderness Experience internal frame exped sized pack.  This pack can be converted to carry only 40L by cinching in all the compression straps.  It has eight cinch straps total, and ten tool lashing points; more than enough options for a mountaineering pack.

If I was doing a trip where only the summit day involved ice and snow, I would use my Kelty external frame pack to get to camp, and a light weight frameless mountaineering knapsack for the summit.  Usually these trips don’t entail as much ice and snow, and the summit is closer to camp, thus I can get away with a smaller pack volume.  I have used three different packs in the past, as summit packs in this configuration; lost two of them to the mountains, while the third was stolen.  Of these the old REI day-and-a-half pack combined the best trade off between weight, volume and utility.  It was similarly configured to the Gregory day-and-a-half pack, but slightly larger at about 23 L.  Currently I have no suitable mountaineering summit pack to go with my external frame pack, but a trip later this summer will require such.  Looks like a field trip to REI is in order – I will provide my opinion of the goods I see.

Ed

10:36 a.m. on July 4, 2012 (EDT)
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ozone-front.jpg

this is what i use as a summit bag.  cold cold world ozone.  weighs about 2 pounds, holds about 37 liters.  ballistic nylon bag, extremely durable.  one main compartment, top loader, decent-sized storage in the top.  no frame; the back pad is a double-folded piece of closed-cell foam.  hip belt is webbing.  it's a small company that will customize for a small fee.  i paid a little extra to have 2 daisy chains of webbing on either side of the buckle so i can lash on crampons, an axe, a wet hard shell.  for a little over $100, it has done exactly what i wanted.  (also serves as my commuter bag when i bike to work).  

downsides? no back ventilation, your back is up against the nylon packbag.  same for the shoulder straps.  also, no big hipbelt.  

1:50 p.m. on July 4, 2012 (EDT)
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That is a cool bag, lead. Joe finally decoded on the Camelbak Fourteener. Will be bigger than both the Deuter Speedpack and the smaller Camelbak he had originally decided on. He tried them in  store and this was the one that would carry the extra layer items he might need at summit too. So he is set and will go end of this month. I am so excited for him!

5:27 p.m. on July 4, 2012 (EDT)
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sounds like a fun trip.  that camelbak looks like a good 'large daypack.' ultimately, it's about the person's fitness and resolve & having the weather cooperate.  i think the goal with the gear is that it works so you don't have to think about it on the hill.

i hiked to the tallest point within a short drive from DC - 1250 feet! not exactly taxing, but finding 800 feet of vertical gain is a challenge unless you want to drive a couple of hours.  steamy at 96 degrees and humid. 

7:19 p.m. on July 4, 2012 (EDT)
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WOW! Sounds fun! We got rain here in Vegas.....I cannot remember the last time we had that!

6:43 p.m. on July 5, 2012 (EDT)
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giftogab said:

That is a cool bag, lead. Joe finally decoded on the Camelbak Fourteener. Will be bigger than both the Deuter Speedpack and the smaller Camelbak he had originally decided on. He tried them in  store and this was the one that would carry the extra layer items he might need at summit too. So he is set and will go end of this month. I am so excited for him!

Of the bags REI had on stock the Fourteener was among my top three choices on a window shop I did July 3rd.  I have two more stops before I finalize my choice.

Ed

10:33 a.m. on July 8, 2012 (EDT)
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Just curious Ed, did you look at the Rim Runner also?  If you did why would you pick the Fourteener over the Rim Runner?

July 22, 2014
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