Tents this time

1:30 a.m. on March 6, 2013 (EST)
4 reviewer rep
9 forum posts

About a year ago, I posted on here asking about an appropriate backpack. I got one for christmas that I am happy with. Now is a question of a good three season tent. I have a few requirements: freestanding, ultralight(wiggle room here), 2 person, fair vestibule space, durable. What would be some good choices? I've been heavily considering a Big Agnes or MSR, but I'm not completely sure that they're worth the money.

6:44 a.m. on March 6, 2013 (EST)
0 reviewer rep
606 forum posts

They are prob worth the money, if you want a tent that will protect you from weather and last for years. You should look for a good used tent, geartrade, ebay or craigslist are good places to start. Check each one out carefully, look at the sellers feedback, your not just buying a tent but trusting the seller to be accurate and truthful as well. A little more info about where you camp and how much you will use the tent would be helpful, plus how much gear you wanna pack inside, maybe your physical size too. Some tents would work great for smaller people, im over six feet so I need a bigger tent than some.

11:00 a.m. on March 6, 2013 (EST)
314 reviewer rep
1,124 forum posts

I see you're from Alabama. So I'm trusting that is where you intend to use this tent most. I would say that one of your highest priorities should be ventilation.  Unlike most gear, a tent must be selected by the climate in which it will be used. You wouldn't take a mountain expedition tent to the desert. Or a cheap dome tent to the snow covered mountains.

 I think that you will see many muggy days and nights with mild temps. If that's the case you might look for something with an inner pitch first, 2 doors, and 2 vents in the fly. The inner should have a bath tub floor with mostly mesh upper.

How are the winds in your area? Do you need allot of guy lines, or very few?

Rains heavy, or light? Light a 1200 mm HH will do. Heavy non stop, 3000 or better.

Snow load? Well that's a whole other beast.

One or two person? I travel with a 2 person tent. I like the room. But that means more weight.

How about your gear? Do you want it outside or inside the tent?

As you can see there is much more to think about than just brand names and weight when it come down to choosing the right tent for your travels. Your tent is the single most important piece of gear. Next is your sleeping gear

BTW there is no such thing as a free standing tent. ALWAYS  stake it down! And use the guy lines. It sucks to wake up in the wee hours in a big storm with the tent wrapped around you.

12:39 p.m. on March 6, 2013 (EST)
102 reviewer rep
2,280 forum posts

Alex:

I like the Hubba Hubba for your application.  It has a good rain fly.  The vestibule entrance is designed such that a vertical rain will not get in your tent when you attempt to enter.  And once zipped up the full length fly will keep out all rain.  And while it is not raining you can remove the fly for ventilation through the bug net.  The Hubba Hubba is a sleeping tent – meaning you don’t really have room to park your pack in there too.  Such luxury cost additional weight.   I think they make a 3P hubba tent if you want such square footage.  Instead I suggest keeping your packs outside, covering them with a large trash bag.  This option is much lighter than the weight of a larger tent.  I've been doing that for decades with no regrets.  And when you think about it, the only stuff you really need from your pack in the tent are your flash light, water, the next day’s change of cloths, and perhaps a book or deck of cards.

I know as a young dude the cost looks steep, but consider this is an investment that you will use for many years to come.  Quality boots, pack, sleeping bag, tent and stove all are worth the coin.  Get all the tent you can afford; few things more aggravating than an uncomfortable tent or one that falls apart after a few trips.

Ed

12:25 a.m. on March 7, 2013 (EST)
4 reviewer rep
9 forum posts

I will mostly stay in the southeast, so it will mostly be moderate weather. And as for the point about stakes and freestanding, I do plan on staking down whenever I can, but I would like to not have to worry about stakes being the only thing holding my tent up. I have looked into the Hubba Hubba extensively, and am leaning towards it. Monsoons are pretty uncommon here, so I don't necessarily need top of the line water-proofing. I'm a skinny guy around 5' 11", so space shouldn't be too much of an issue. I want a 2-person so that I can keep my gear with me if I'm alone. And my budget is around $400. I hope this all helps to give an idea of what I want/need.

7:37 a.m. on March 7, 2013 (EST)
1,631 reviewer rep
3,962 forum posts

I had a Big Agnes Copper Spur 1 and it was a great tent. The only reason I parted with it was because I have quite a few tents and it wasn't seeing much use so I figured someone else could enjoy it. 

I reviewed it here:

http://www.trailspace.com/gear/big-agnes/copper-spur-ul1/#review23539

9:51 p.m. on March 7, 2013 (EST)
314 reviewer rep
1,124 forum posts

You might look at Tarptents too. Though not free standing. A very fine UL tent. With great ventilation.

11:55 p.m. on March 7, 2013 (EST)
REVIEW CORPS
1,397 reviewer rep
442 forum posts

Definitely look at Golite's new line of free-standing tents. Plenty of space and very light at an amazing price.

http://www.golite.com/Imogene-UL2-P47000.aspx

Their Imagen 2UL tent come with high quality DAC V stakes, pre-attached guy lines, and tough but uber light silnylon construction. The extended ridge pole keeps rain out of the tent even if the fly is rolled back completely, and it weighs 2lb 11oz including 8 stakes and a stuff sack. For $249...

1:00 a.m. on March 8, 2013 (EST)
REVIEW CORPS
1,397 reviewer rep
442 forum posts

Sorry. Total grammar failure - their Imogene UL2 comes...

I think it definitely gives the MSR and BA's a run for their money, so to speak - under 2.5 poind trail weight! Give them a call.

11:32 a.m. on March 12, 2013 (EDT)
0 reviewer rep
430 forum posts

Rick-Pittsburgh said:

I had a Big Agnes Copper Spur 1 and it was a great tent. The only reason I parted with it was because I have quite a few tents and it wasn't seeing much use so I figured someone else could enjoy it. 

I reviewed it here:

http://www.trailspace.com/gear/big-agnes/copper-spur-ul1/#review23539

 That's good to hear.... I was wondering about this company and any quality as i have never seen or heard of them before.

I have been away from modern packing some 25 + years.

To the OP don't discount Kelty.

I really like my old Vortex II still.......... It is roomy for 2, the rain cover has 2 vestibules large enough to suit me anyway for muddy boots, and packs.

The rain cover has 2 scoops with mini pole built in to hold then open.

I know this model in no longer made but there are Kelty tents much like it that are.

I bought this one from campmor back in 1996 one 97.

Oh I should mention I prefer very neutral color tents. The blue tents made people look dead.. I will never own a blue tent no matter how well it is made.

Yellow and orange are not so bad and can be a little cheery in fact but still they throw off color.

Grays may look dull in the store under lights, but we 'Be' inside a tent and that is where the color matters.

In Beginners under the tarp topic i just did a mini report with a few pics. I also added more pics in my profile, The tarp from Kelty isn;t the same 'cool gray' I am used to, and in a few days i hope to set up the Votex II next to the tarp which is still in the woods and in the rain at the moment.

Testing ya know....

5:24 p.m. on March 12, 2013 (EDT)
1,631 reviewer rep
3,962 forum posts

Lodge Pole said:

Yellow and orange are not so bad and can be a little cheery in fact but still they throw off color.

One of the reasons I am so fond of my Soulo:

image.jpg

11:49 p.m. on March 12, 2013 (EDT)
0 reviewer rep
430 forum posts

Rick-Pittsburgh said:

Lodge Pole said:

Yellow and orange are not so bad and can be a little cheery in fact but still they throw off color.

One of the reasons I am so fond of my Soulo:

image.jpg

 I kind of have my eye on the Black Diamond Ahwahnee, and with 1 or 2 vestibules for the other 3 season camping.

If i do this it will be my last tent probably... And my first winter tent. This would be for 2 people, that are not getting any younger.

Locally there is a used Gardua Trikaya on consignment.

I saw it the last time i was in the shop and went to see it today in the hard rain, but they didn't have any indoor room to look it over.

I will go back ASAP. I am not sure what these wild colors would be like to be inside of. I am not sure what year could be he last year that tent was made either, but my best guess is 96/98ish.

Not sure what i should do.

There is a blue mountain hardware there too but I won't even look at that.

I must be off my rocker in this line of thinking, but it is what it is. I prefer warm color sleeping bags too. Green, blue and gray look cold..

I have a old, antique LOL Early Winters 1 kilo synthetic bag I use as a liner bag and it is silky gold inside and a bit pale red outside and has a metalic liner that makes it feel like it was turned on.

I don't seem to experience trapped moisture in it, but then I use a home made VB liner inside of that.

A note on that: Once i found ice in the outer layer of my winter down bag and really had a bad hair day over that. What it turned out to be was I had stuffed my feet into my home seam hard enough to open a gap about 8 inches long.....

Moisture went out that gap and into both bags where it condensed on the outer layer of nylon and inside my gortex bivey. At least the sun was out and the wind was under 40 that day, so i was able to sublimate that problem away.

2:09 a.m. on March 20, 2013 (EDT)
0 reviewer rep
51 forum posts

XterroBrando said:

Definitely look at Golite's new line of free-standing tents. Plenty of space and very light at an amazing price.

http://www.golite.com/Imogene-UL2-P47000.aspx

Their Imagen 2UL tent come with high quality DAC V stakes, pre-attached guy lines, and tough but uber light silnylon construction. The extended ridge pole keeps rain out of the tent even if the fly is rolled back completely, and it weighs 2lb 11oz including 8 stakes and a stuff sack. For $249...

 

Oh man, that's an amazing tent!

August 2, 2014
Quick Reply

Please sign in to reply

 
More Topics
This forum: Older: Seal Skinz waterproof gloves Newer: backpacking binoculars
All forums: Older: Backcountry flotsam…. Subtitle: What could this be? Newer: 1% for the Planet Announces Mad Marathon