3 person tent for 2 people and 2 dogs

11:30 a.m. on April 5, 2013 (EDT)
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I love this website, so I just joined and this is my first post.

I need a reliable 3 (maybe 4) person tent. I am 5'7" and my boyfriend is 6'. Our dog Ellie is a 90lb mutt, and we will be getting another large dog (70-90lb) sometime in the near future. Our current 2 person tent fits all three of us, but it is snug, and another "Ellie sized" dog would certainly put us over the limit . Our current tent also cannot be setup on platform because it has to be anchored to the ground. We backpack frequently, but in short stints (usually a weekend or a week). We don't backpack during the winter months, but we live in New England, so we may encounter freezing temps and slight snow, and we definitely encounter rain (also lots or rocks and dog claws). The lighter the better, since I am relatively small, even though I am 5'7". 

Basically I want a durable, spacious, lightweight, 3 season tent that is platform friendly. Any suggestions?   

12:43 p.m. on April 5, 2013 (EDT)
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Golite Shangri-la #3 or #5 tent

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Forest Green, shown with bug net w/floor inside as mentioned below. Has one pole in middle but can be tied from loop above/top to a limb or strung line. Two vents on top front and back. Reflective stake pulls. Plenty of space. The #5 is larger inside and out but not much more.

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Bamboo Yellow

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Internal bug netted w/floor tent. Can be used alone or with rainfly above.

http://www.golite.com/gear/tents

Golite is having a sale now. 50% off both models #3 $249,#5 $299.

Check it out and look for other images at Google.

I used one for 12 year before selling it to a friend who was going to Everest

12:45 p.m. on April 5, 2013 (EDT)
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Also welcome new member(s) and thanks for joining. Check out the gear reviews section too. I think I reviewed this tent above there?

Gary Palmer

7:40 p.m. on April 5, 2013 (EDT)
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Hey Lorax, welcome to Trailspace. Great to have ya.

So ya need a tent huh? May I ask a big question that will have a lot to do with what might be within your reach?

What is your spending limit on a tent?

That will help big time in regards to all of us making suggestions for ya.

Happy hiking.

-Rick

9:06 p.m. on April 5, 2013 (EDT)
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look at the rei habitat 4. it's more of a basecamp tent, not really designed for backpacking, but its roomy. I don't think any four person tent is going to be light, especially a freestanding tent. check out the gear section for some more choices.

8:10 a.m. on April 6, 2013 (EDT)
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BA Copper Spur UL 4 (5.5lbs:)

http://www.trailspace.com/gear/big-agnes/copper-spur-ul4/

Split the load and it is quite doable. Doesn't weigh much more than my 4 season solo tent w/footprint.

I would recommend placing something on the floor(ie tarp) for puppy paws and puppy claws. 

Or you could go even lighter(4.5lbs) by getting a UL 3 and letting the poochies sleep in the vestis.

http://www.trailspace.com/gear/big-agnes/copper-spur-ul3/

Just throwing out a hail mary w/o much further info(spending limitations.)

10:25 a.m. on April 6, 2013 (EDT)
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I like Gary's suggestions.  I would teach your two large dogs to pack and then you can have some deluxe camps.

2:04 p.m. on April 6, 2013 (EDT)
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Golites Shangri-la 3 is now Sale Price: $249.99  (Suggested Retail: $500.00)

and weighs but 4 lbs 5 oz. | 1.97 kg

The tent is divided into two stuff sacks, one for the fly and the other for the inner bug screen and floor section. The single pole and stakes have individual pockets in the stuff sacks.

You can substitute a hiking staff for the inner pole to reduce weight. Or use a loop on top tied to a tree limb above or line strung between tree's to take away the inner pole.


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I plan to get another one this summer. I am using a Mountain hardwear that weighs the same but not as roomy. Wish I had never sold my other one! 

Features:

  • Includes flysheet and nest
  • Two, larger peak vents optimize cross-ventilation
  •     External peak loop allows shelter to be suspended without pole
  •     Floorless shelter system works alone or with nest depending on conditions
  •     Internal peak loop for attaching nest
  •     Reflective guy points for stability and visibility
  •     High internal gear loops for clothes lines and hanging items
  •     Durable YKK® zippered door with snag-guard, Velcro® & snap closures
  •     Reinforced cone pole seat
  •     Factory-taped seams for field ready performance out of the bag
  •     Upgraded adjustable aluminum center pole features lighter Green Anodizing process
  •     Pitches with 6 stakes, included
  •     No-See-Um Mesh body keeps the smallest bugs out and lets the air flow
  •     Durable 3000mm waterproof polyurethane-coated nylon 8-inch bathtub style floor
  •     Side-hanging door with two-way zipper keeps the door clean

 

Materials:

  • 15 Denier Ripstop Nylon
  • Silicone/PU 1200mm Waterproof Fire Retardant Coating
  • 20 Denier Polyester No-See-Um Mesh
  • 7001/6061 Alloy Aluminum Poles
  • 7001 Alloy Aluminum Stakes
  • 20 Denier Polyester No-See-Um Mesh
  • 70 Denier 190T Nylon Taffeta
  • 3000mm Waterproof, Fire Retardant Coating

 

Tech aspects:

  • Type: 3-person
  • Height: 62 inches
  • Area: 59 sq. ft | 5.5 sq. m
  • Packed Dimensions: 5 x 6.5 x 18 inches

Average Rating: 5 Stars (based on 78 reviews)

See @ http://www.golite.com/Shangri-La-3-Tent-P46713.aspx

3:18 p.m. on April 6, 2013 (EDT)
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I am kinda at a loss with "suggested retail" prices. My question is suggested by who? The manufacturer?

Okay next question is based on/compared to what?

Not knocking GoLite but listing suggested price with the actual "low end pricing" is nothing more than a sales tactic.

I mean they made this change well over a year ago(Direct Sales/see here) but still feel the need to post the suggested price still today?

Why?

For what other reason than to make one think "wow, now that is a deal and a half."

I do not know of any other outdoor gear manufacturer that utilizes this tactic as far as going above and beyond to let it be known that the product is one hell of a deal.

I was a sales team leader many moons ago.

The product that I sold cost the distributor $400 and the asking price was $2499.

The funny thing was that the seller had the latitude to move the sale price wherever they wanted to get the sale(down to $999.)

Was the purchaser getting a deal?

You tell me.

7:04 p.m. on April 6, 2013 (EDT)
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o

7:08 p.m. on April 6, 2013 (EDT)
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hey rick,

thanks for the welcome. The less expensive the better obviously, but I like quality gear. I would say my limit is 500, but if I'm paying that much I want something with a guarantee, and not a dinky 1 year warranty, I'm talking lifetime. I really want something that will last.

7:20 p.m. on April 6, 2013 (EDT)
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Hi gary,

The go-lite seems nice, except the reviews I read in the gear section said they may have a problem with the fly being flimsy, and bugs getting in. I also read a review about water issues. I always seem to get caught in the rain, and my poor boyfriend is a bug magnet. How have your experiences been with it? what kind of camping do you do with it? how often? how many people (or dogs) sleep in it? has it ripped or leaked in the rain?

7:23 p.m. on April 6, 2013 (EDT)
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Hi ppine,

My dog does carry her own pack, but I'm not sure I'm interested in deluxe camping, that seems to kind of defeat the purpose of camping to begin with :P

7:31 p.m. on April 6, 2013 (EDT)
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The big angus 3 and 4 look nice. I may have to go with a 4 based on the reviews. I cant put elle in the vestibule, she has to be in the tent, which means dog two will also have to be in the tent.  

7:45 p.m. on April 6, 2013 (EDT)
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The Copper Spur(as well as all BA tents) carry a lifetime guarantee. I had the Copper Spur UL1(which I reviewed here) but sold it due to the fact that I felt it was being neglected. I have other tents.

It was a nice rig but I just didn't use it much and like winter way too much.

Plus I thought someone out there could enjoy it.

I would make 2 strong recommendations with these types of tents.

First and foremost these are UL tents constructed with lightweight materials.

The floor is 30D. By all means use a footprint with a tent like this. They don't weigh much and can save you some serious grief. 

It is a lot easier(and cheaper) to replace a footprint compared to a worn out tent floor.

The manufacturer makes them specifically for each model which is nice because it also gives you the ability to pitch the tent w/o the inner. 

Or you can make your own if ya want. Here is a how to video for ya if you are interested:

The next suggestion would be being that you are bringing the poochies in the shelter line the floor with something to protect it from claws. 

11:02 a.m. on April 7, 2013 (EDT)
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Lorax,

Deluxe camp as in real food for you and your dogs, and a 3 person tent.

1:23 p.m. on April 7, 2013 (EDT)
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definitely look at the big agnes tents. they are made well. just have to get some boots for your dogs!

12:30 p.m. on April 8, 2013 (EDT)
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I agree with going with Big Agnes. I bought the Lynx Pass 2 last year for my husband and I (and occasionally the dogs - sleep in vestibule). I would have went with the Copper Spur, but we had $200 in gift cards and that's what we paid for the Lynx Pass.

2:02 p.m. on April 8, 2013 (EDT)
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I used mine in all kinds of weather from Alaska to Arizona. Snow, monsoon rains, mosquito's in Alaska that were in clouds so dense you could see them coming. I never had any problems with my tent and still plan to get another.

Have never had a dog in it, wish I had a dog but would have to be a good runner to keep up with me cycle touring.

I took and have always taken care of my equipment never got tears in it, never leaked on me. Only time I found it disn't work well was at a sandy beack camp at Hermit Rapids in the Grand Canyon, sand would blow up over the  bathtub style floor and into the tent.

Other than that I used mine about 12 years before selling it to a friend going to stay at Everest basecamp.

I had the tent is three parts, a floor with no bug net above, I used to sleep on when it was dry weather camping, I also had the bug netting w/floor and the rainfly top. Any part can be used with the others or alone.

It held the snow off pretty well in Wyoming,Alaska but never used it in Yosemite winters (Sierra Cement), like rain snow just slid right off. It can blow a bit in high windy conditions. Being a non-selfsupported tent it needs to be staked out. I use rocks/stones as anchors when on slickrock in Utah and granite in Wyoming.

It will sleep 3 people if you use a guy line above outside the tent, there is the #5 which sleeps 5 I guess. I had the #3 and it was always just me and my gear/bike.

I like it for its weight 4.6 lbs, its hieght making it possible to stand on my knees or on my feet bent at the waist and its roominess. I live outdoors 6-9 months a year (Sept-May) 275 days and my tent is my house.

And it packs down into two small bags (the rainfly in one and the bugnetted/floor section in another) the pole and stake's slide into outside pockets on the bags.

The floor is a stronger material than most tents I have used. The center pole sets on a extra patch of nylon on the floor and the top end sticks up to where the triangled roof comes together.

The vents on the front and back keeps condensation from forming inside. I substitute aluminum Y or T stakes for the ones that came with it as I often camp in the desert and other areas with rocks beneath the surface. I don't like stakes that curl up when they hit something. Y and T stakes go around or stop.

Golite has a life time garantee. I just checked talking online with a representative.

8:41 p.m. on April 8, 2013 (EDT)
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you're looking for a free standing four person tent, am I right? if you are then that rules out the tent suggested by gary, it needs to be staked out. 

8:59 p.m. on April 8, 2013 (EDT)
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Technically, the Spur needs staked out as well in order to use the vestibules and properly pitch the tent.

My Hilleberg Soulo does not need to be staked out and is what I call a truly free standing tent.

There are not many tents that are really free standing.

12:20 a.m. on April 9, 2013 (EDT)
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Hey Lorax and welcome to Trailspace,

There are literally dozens and dozens of tents both past and present that fit the parameters that you have given us so far. To narrow down what you are looking for so that we can make some recommendations we could use a little bit more information. Exactly how much sq. ft. do you feel you need on the inside of the tent? Since your dogs won't sleep in a vestibule do you want or need a vestibule? I hardly ever use vestibule on any of my tents unless they have a floor. I find that when setting up a tent w/ a floorless vestibule on wet ground or green plant material that condensation gathers on the roof and the walls of the vestibule and then rains down on what ever is in the vestibule in the morning when there is movement in the tent. I usually just fold the vestibule towards the tent and don't use it or better yet to save weight I use tents without a vestibule. Last but not least what is your weight limit? I'm assuming that you split the tent weight between yourself and your boyfriend? For the most part the lighter the tent the more fragile it will be. I have dogs and when using any of my tents I use a foot print on the ground to protect the outside of the floor and then I use one on the inside of the tent to protect the floor from may dogs nails. I usually use Tyvek house wrap for both the inside and outside footprints as it's really cheap and I have never seen a piece wear out. I've seen many factory foot prints that get trashed fairly quickly.

Oh yea, do you need this tent right away or do you have some time to look for it?

Remember that with two people and two dogs inside the tent that it will need to be properly ventilated in both good and bad weather conditions so it does not build up condensation. That narrows the list down considerably.

3:37 a.m. on April 9, 2013 (EDT)
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Found this if 40 sq ft of tent space is enough.  The MSR  Mutha  Hubba  3 Person Tent.  Highly rated, free standing, just under 7 lbs.  I know they made them with vented fly's and regular fly later on.  This looks like the fly with out the vent's.  $379.00 buy it now ebay.

"MSR's best-selling freestanding 3-person tent has all the same features of the best-selling Hubba Hubba tent, and delivers maximum livability for three. It's the ideal tent for a minimalist trio backpacking deep into the Sierra's in the heat of summer or tackling the Appalachian Trail for an extended trip in the spring."

"Winner of the Backpacker Magazine Editors' Choice Award.  MSR's best-selling freestanding 3-person tent has all the same features of our best-selling Hubba Hubba tent, and delivers maximum livability for three. Its the ideal tent for a minimalist trio backpacking deep into the Sierras in the heat of summer or tackling the Appalachian Trail for an extended trip in the spring."

http://www.ebay.com/itm/MSR-Mutha-Hubba-3-Person-Tent-/261197143582?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item3cd0901e1e

http://www.trailspace.com/gear/msr/mutha-hubba/

With the factory footprint once can set this up in the fly only configuration to save weight.  Foot print on ebay $39

http://www.ebay.com/itm/MSR-MUTHA-HUBBA-TENT-FOOTPRINT-5165-/310533563553?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item484d3e24a1

 

 

 

 

You mentioned snow.  I would guess that  Mutha  Hubba could handle minimal snow.  If you have any more than minimal snow there is this great deal on ebay.  The Black Diamond Bombshelter Tent.  I have this tent and it really is a Bomb Shelter. At $549, if no one else bids, this is a screaming deal (retails for $850+/-). Weighs a little more but well worth it in my opinion.  Freestanding and 50 sq ft.  single wall tent but its 100% factory seam taped.  Mine does great in the rain.  Vents well with me and my dog.

http://www.ebay.com/itm/Black-Diamond-Bombshelter-Tent-YELLOW-GRAY-4-person-4-season-tent-/121091403306?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item1c319c2e2a

 

http://www.blackdiamondequipment.com/en-us/shop/mountain/shelters/bombshelter-tent?utm_source=google&utm_medium=cpc&utm_term=black%20diamond%20bombshelter%20tent&utm_content=Bombshelter_CopyGETQUALITYnodki&utm_campaign=Product-Tent&gclid=CNKZ-v6FvbYCFYqf4Aodj0UAag

 

http://www.trailspace.com/gear/black-diamond/bombshelter/

 

http://www.trailspace.com/gear/bibler/bombshelter/

 

I have quite a few tents and this is one of may favorite tents as far as weight, ease of setup, for the amount of sq. ft.  You can leave the vestibule pole at home to save weight and just pull the vestibule against the tent if you don't want to use it.

Hope this helps.............

7:29 a.m. on April 9, 2013 (EDT)
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Hey Brian, 

How ya been stranger?

The first tent is a 3 person model and weighs in at close to 7lbs. That isn't light and would be more in the area of the Mountain Pass 3 I owned years back. 

Keep in mind it will be her, her 6ft boyfriend, and 2 dogs that are in the 90lb range(neither of which will sleep in the vestis.)

In regards to the Bombshelter.

This is a single wall tent more geared towards cold weather/alpine use. It is well known that single wall tents can be really prone to condensation issues. 

How bad do ya think it would be with 4 bodies exhaling in the tent in a rain storm in say August?

This tent will primarily be utilized for 3 season use. 

9:22 a.m. on April 9, 2013 (EDT)
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Hey Lorax,


Welcome to the forum. Since your activities and playground seem to mirror my own, I spend most of my backcountry time in the Dak's/Catskills, and have a 120lb four paw drive monstrosity myself, I'll throw in the Mountain Hardwear Hammerhead 3 as a suggestion. It seams to work really well because the floor layout is a bit different than most making it a lot more roomy than most three person tents. You get quite a bit of room in the length so there is room for two big foot warmers. If it's only two of you plus the dogs, it should be plenty.


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It is a bit heavy for a three person tent, I don't think its bad at all, but that is cause it is bombproof, feature rich and can easily go three & a half seasons. I have no worries pushing up on snow season in the dak's (which, as you probably know, can come in August at times) The two doors is a big benefit and it is really well vented. In fact, for hot weather, you can lighten the load and leave the "hard" panels that cover the mesh areas at home if you want. And, if my dog is making me bring the heavier tent, he's carrying at least some of it...

If you get the footprint, you can even setup the rainfly first, then throw the inner tent under it and set it up under cover. Nice when it's pouring rain.

Though I don't like them, I also camp in places where platforms are the only viable tent sight and though the Hammerhead needs stake out points for the vestibules at least, and guylines to stormproof it, I never have trouble. It is primarily free standing & the platforms always have nails or something to tie too. I also make toggles out of branches and tie guylines around them, drop them through the gaps between boards and catch them underneath. Lot's of tricks to make platforms work.

As a bonus, a lot of outfitters use these as rentals, so you can try one out first to see how you like it.

http://www.trailspace.com/gear/mountain-hardwear/hammerhead-3/

10:21 a.m. on April 9, 2013 (EDT)
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Shenandoah makes some similar tents including a 4 person large enough to stand up in.  I have never used these tents, but have lots of experience in tents without floors.  It can be an advantage not to have floor, especially with dogs.  I use a footprint from a tent I have never heard of under my sb.

10:33 a.m. on April 9, 2013 (EDT)
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ppine said:

  It can be an advantage not to have floor, especially with dogs. 

 No, not around here. You'd wake up with all manner of things crawling out of your nose/ears/mouth, if you ever managed to get to sleep.

My wife has a hard time controlling herself every time she looks through the mesh and sees the number of spiders, among other things, crawling around on the underside of the fly. I told her once how people here advocate using just the fly with no inner tent to save weight, there is no way I could type the sound she made.

5:49 p.m. on April 9, 2013 (EDT)
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Hey Rick,

Yep I did look a the weight of both tents. The Bombshelter is the much better tent for the money and the weight.

In my post just above the tent I asked Lorax some questions regarding what she was looking for in a tent as her first post did not give very much info on what she want's. How much sq. ft. is she looking for?. One thing I do know from sleeping with dogs in tents is that they will curl up into the smallest ball they can because it's cold and if their are two dogs they will also jam themselves as close together when sleeping to conserve heat. Even two large mastiff's will curl up taking the same space as a large human when sleeping.

I regards to the first tent being a little heavy. Once you start getting into the larger sq ft tent you have to go up in weights of materials (thicker material, and larger diameter poles and or more poles). The last time I was in REI I was poking at the Copper Spur type tents and I can promise you that I would not want to be in a 40-50 sq ft tent made of those materials when a big wind hit or a hail, rain, snow storm hit.

I used my TNF Oval Intention that is around 40 sq. ft. give or take for 25 years before retiring and it slept myself, girlfriend, and two large mastiff’s.  As the tent was for sleeping that’s what we did.  In the morning when the dogs started to stir I would kick them out and go back to sleep.

 

6:34 p.m. on April 9, 2013 (EDT)
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"I want a durable, spacious, lightweight, 3 season tent that is platform friendly"

The Bibler Bombshelter is ,in use, about 9lbs so hardly "lightweight" in my book. As already mentioned it is (like most Biblers) an alpine/mountaineering tent so not really ideal for camping in rainy weather but great for wind and snow.


As for the Shangri La 3 , light and spacious but not really platform friendly. Besides if you need to use the bug inner,  when it rains you have to keep the shelter fully sealed up because you have no vestibule . With four breathing bodies inside condensation could be a problem when fully sealed up...
The SL 5 could do it but again not really for platforms particularly if using the bug inner. You need to set that inner up then add the "rain fly" , the rain fly alone needs 8 precisely placed stakes and takes up 90 sq feet (9 '6" per side)
Of course that is just my opinion....

2:27 p.m. on April 10, 2013 (EDT)
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no three or four person tent is going to be lightweight.

3:32 p.m. on April 10, 2013 (EDT)
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Trailjester said:

no three or four person tent is going to be lightweight.

 Sure they are, when you divide the weight between the three or four people that will be using it. And yes, animals are people too.

5:09 p.m. on April 10, 2013 (EDT)
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Im fairly new to equipment, so unfortunately I don't have strict perimeters (i.e. weight and sq footage). My first section of the appalachian trail was three years ago(my first real backpacking trip) and my brother, sister and I used a "party tent"; you know one of those tents for twelve people that you set up in your back yard. The next year my brother gave me a two person tent as a Christmas present, so I have never actually purchased a tent, hence the ignorance to all things tent. The weight will be divided between at least two people (plus Elle carries supplies as she starts to eat her food). Therefore if the tent weight/2 is reasonable for one person, it's a good tent for me. That being said I'm ok with carrying more weight of it means not getting soaked or accosted by Mosquitos. I have never slept in a tent with out a floor before, im not sure I want to, but I will try anything once. My current tent dosnt have vestibules, so I'm not sure whether I would want them or not, but they sound useful for keeping equipment (I pulled my pack inside with me on my last trip) I have time before I need a new tent. Hope that answers some questions, thanks for all the replys. Sorry I'm sorta short on details. I like the idea of renting a tent for a trip. I'm going on a short trip this weekend, I think I will rent one of the suggested tents and see how we fare

6:23 p.m. on April 10, 2013 (EDT)
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here are some suggestions... If you really want freestanding 

MSR Mutha Hubba about 6lbs 6oz (40sq feet all usable)

Nemo Losi 3 , 6lbs 13 oz, 50sq feet ,most usable

You could also look at the Tarptent Hogback, 4 lbs , 52sq feet all usable. About the same usable space as the Golite SL5 but almost half of the footprint and sets up dry (fly and inner go up together so the floor remains dry ) Needs a minimum amount of expertise to set up on platforms but still much easier than some... (I look after Tarptent in Australia)

6:57 p.m. on April 10, 2013 (EDT)
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apeman said:

Hey Rick,

Yep I did look a the weight of both tents. The Bombshelter is the much better tent for the money and the weight.

It is a single wall. There will be 4 occupants in it exhaling moisture and will be used more in the warmer seasons as stated by the OP:

"We don't backpack during the winter months, but we live in New England, so we may encounter freezing temps and slight snow, and we definitely encounter rain" 

Definitely would not be my first choice by a long shot. 

In my post just above the tent I asked Lorax some questions regarding what she was looking for in a tent as her first post did not give very much info on what she want's. How much sq. ft. is she looking for?. One thing I do know from sleeping with dogs in tents is that they will curl up into the smallest ball they can because it's cold and if their are two dogs they will also jam themselves as close together when sleeping to conserve heat.

Not when it is mid summer. 

Even two large mastiff's will curl up taking the same space as a large human when sleeping.

I regards to the first tent being a little heavy. Once you start getting into the larger sq ft tent you have to go up in weights of materials (thicker material, and larger diameter poles and or more poles). The last time I was in REI I was poking at the Copper Spur type tents and I can promise you that I would not want to be in a 40-50 sq ft tent made of those materials when a big wind hit or a hail, rain, snow storm hit.

I used my Copper Spur in rain, winds, and hail and didn't have much issue. 

Didn't and won't use it in snow because it is a 3 season tent and really not designed for that. I have bigger guns for that type of weather. 

I used my TNF Oval Intention that is around 40 sq. ft. give or take for 25 years before retiring and it slept myself, girlfriend, and two large mastiff’s.  As the tent was for sleeping that’s what we did.  In the morning when the dogs started to stir I would kick them out and go back to sleep.

Brian, may I ask what types of distance were you backpacking? That tent itself weighed in at around 11lbs if I am correct. 

Great basecamp tent but not for backpacking. 

8:39 p.m. on April 10, 2013 (EDT)
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Used a Big Agnes Copper Spur 3 for two of us and two dogs for 3 weeks on the AT in 2011 and 2 weeks in 2012.  The dogs are a full grown yellow Lab(75lbs) and a Huskie/Aussie mix (50 lbs).  We are both about 5'5" me about 140, she is 125. No issues with space, except the dogs trying to cozy up into the sleeping bags.  Actually sold my Western Mountaineering Ultralite and bought a Sycamore so it was not a fight to close the sleeping bag. (both trips above were spring trips.) Packed weight is 4lbs 6oz, and offers 44 sq ft of floor area. Light, liveable for two people and two dogs for an extended trip.

8:44 p.m. on April 10, 2013 (EDT)
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Sorry, specs are for the new model, couple ounces lighter than the one we used. Also, with the high bathtub/small volume of mesh, much less prone to have the nails of the dog rip a hole in said mesh, which has happened to the MSR Hubbas, unfortunately.

8:54 p.m. on April 10, 2013 (EDT)
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LARGE 2 PERSON TENT

The Tarptent Scarp 2 is a generously sized two person tent with enough room for 2 medium sized (border collie) dogs as well. Check out the photos and drawings on their website. This is a light 2 person tent. There are optional crossing poles for very windy or snowy conditions.

I have a Scarp 2 and it is great. 2 doors and vestibules. Let the dogs sleep by one door and you guys by the other. Or let a dog sleep on a CFC mat in each vestibule. (Double protection.)

Be sure the dogs carry their own sleep mats and food!

11:07 a.m. on April 14, 2013 (EDT)
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The dogs can carry anything can stand getting wet.  They should carry the tent.

September 15, 2014
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