Better than Bronner's?

11:52 p.m. on November 5, 2013 (EST)
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Not quite gear, but figured it's got to go someplace.

http://www.rei.com/product/832701/kiss-my-face-peace-soap-34-oz

http://www.kissmyface.com/product/item/167

Came across this soap the other day at REI, and hadn't seen it before, so I picked up a bottle, unscrewed the cap, and gave it a sniff.

Holy heck, it smelled great.

Maybe my nostrils grew tired of Dr. B's Almond, but this had a really nice, fresh, lemony scent to it. Wound-up buying a bottle of the Lemongrass/Clary Sage.

For a nickel less than a travel-size bottle of Dr. B's, you get 0.4 oz more. Not a bad deal. Only downside is more soap means less packability - I'll definitely be portioning this soap out into a small container.

Have yet to hit the trail with it, but wanted to put a line out there and see if anyone else had come across it or - better yet - used it in the backcountry and can speak for how it holds up.

12:18 a.m. on November 6, 2013 (EST)
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Outdoors I use sand to wash with, works as good as Lava brand soap. Most things come off with just water if you wash daily. I do sometimes carry liquid soaps for washing but rarely. To wash my hair I usually use just water, heated if nessessary.

7:50 a.m. on November 6, 2013 (EST)
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There's nothing much better in my opinion than to do a full body scrub down in a cold creek on a long backpacking trip and to have Dr Bronners standing by looking on.  He's funny that way.

In the winter when a full body immersion might kill me I do the deed with bronners just on my face, hair, scalp and hands.  Of course, I rinse my soapy hair away from the creek.

I've always said such an act makes me feel 26 years old for about 30 minutes---pretty good when you're in the middle of nowhere.

But to me the main question would be---

"What soap has absolutely no effect on water quality??  On a list of the best soaps, where does Bronners rank?"

Does anyone know if there's a backpacking soap you can use in the water itself w/o the slightest trace of pollution?

9:56 a.m. on November 6, 2013 (EST)
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Does anyone know if there's a backpacking soap you can use in the water itself w/o the slightest trace of pollution?

There aren't any! Any saponified oil has some environmental impact. My personal judgement is the impact of a very small quantity veggie-oil based soap is fairly small. Nonetheless, I rinse 200 feet away from the water. 

I typically don't wash at all for trips under a week. After a week or so, I'll hit a town and do a full wash-up, and often carry Dr. B's with me. Dr. Bronner makes a bar soap too - which is a bit lighter than the liquid. I'll chop a bar into nickel-sized chunks, and one such chunk is more than enough for a full-body clean.

11:12 a.m. on November 6, 2013 (EST)
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Wet wipes for body and a tiny bottle of hand sanitizer.  You don't want baby wipes or anything that has lotions in it, just a cleaning wipe to clear the friction points once in a while.  Both take up little space for the result. Neither one has any runoff factor so long as you pack out your used wipes.

11:57 a.m. on November 6, 2013 (EST)
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Right with ya, there, Tipi. Until I can back home and into a hot shower, a little washing-up goes a long way out on the trail.

Think you're right, there, Seth. The bar soap's a good call - no risk of spillage.

I just liked this new soap for the scent. Haven't come across anything like it with 'ol Dr. B.

Wet wipes are the one thing I always, always forget about, LS. Nice not only for friction points, but for an occasional hand-cleansing, too. Easy to pack out and easier, still, to use.

12:06 p.m. on November 6, 2013 (EST)
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i also tend to go soap-less if i can.  winter immersion....is fun in a kind of crazy, electrifying way, if you're in a situation where you can quickly cover up and warm up. 

12:30 p.m. on November 6, 2013 (EST)
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I hiked with a guy once in the Sierra's that in mid winter would chop a hole in the ice of a high alpine lake where the water was deep enough to go under without bending over and bathe. He acted like it was perfectly normal, even washing his hair then letting it freeze dry to a stiff combed mass, Brrrrrr!

12:54 p.m. on November 6, 2013 (EST)
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I like Dr. Bronner's, but most of my trips are in bear country and bears like nice smells. For that reason, I use unscented soaps, usually liquid. If the weather is halfway decent, I'll take a bath whenever I can. Even though on my hiking trips, I get sweaty, my canoe trips often involve getting really dirty. Portaging through a bog, an old burn, that sort of thing. 

2:03 p.m. on November 6, 2013 (EST)
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I usually wash-up prior to leaving on my last day out so I don't wind up fumigating my car with some backcountry funk. 

This new soap sure isn't for bear country - the smell's way too appealing. Probably fine for my neck of the woods, so to speak, but after seeing Goose post a picture of a mountain lion in IL, well, probably best to keep my guard up, regardless.

3:07 p.m. on November 6, 2013 (EST)
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HRH, mountain lions are not like bears, their diet is much different, so I wouldn't worry about smells for the cats. Bears, on the other hand, will eat soap.

3:16 p.m. on November 6, 2013 (EST)
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Well, at least I won't have to worry about sharing soap with the cats.

Gotta be grateful for the little things, right?

10:31 a.m. on November 7, 2013 (EST)
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Hi friends -

I found this interesting history of Dr. Bronner's soaps. Since many of us are big fans, here is a link:

11:00 a.m. on November 7, 2013 (EST)
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During the summer months I usually take a bar of Ivory soap; it floats which saves me from losing it at the bottom of the lake or river.

Winter is a whole other matter. During the depth of winter when the temperature is below minus 40C, I wash my face with a tea bag fresh from the pot. The heat feels heavenly although on long trips my face turns brown.

1:42 p.m. on November 7, 2013 (EST)
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North1 said:

During the summer months I usually take a bar of Ivory soap; it floats which saves me from losing it at the bottom of the lake or river.

Winter is a whole other matter. During the depth of winter when the temperature is below minus 40C, I wash my face with a tea bag fresh from the pot. The heat feels heavenly although on long trips my face turns brown.

 There's truth to the notion that people living out in the winter actually stay warmer by not bathing---a crust or body oils keep us warm.  I have found this to be true.  But even in the winter it's nice to wet a paper towel and scrub down my face and neck.

Your tea bag comment reminds me of a recent trip---


TRIP%20108%20113-L.jpg

Little Mitten always says I wake up with big bags under my eyes and dangit she's right.

4:13 p.m. on November 7, 2013 (EST)
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I do the same thing! A peppermint tea-bag after a week of sweat, sunscreen and pine sap is the best!

5:00 p.m. on November 7, 2013 (EST)
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Great photo Walter! I guess the benefits of tea are now universally known.

Thanks, Seth. I usually go for the more highly caffeinated varieties, but peppermint will now be on the list for my next adventure.

7:07 p.m. on November 7, 2013 (EST)
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Ha! Nice, Walter. Good look for ya! Cracks me up.

Looks like you found an alternative use for tea bags, North - sunless tanner!

10:26 p.m. on November 7, 2013 (EST)
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herbal tea bags of most any sort are stellar!

once cashed, save the bag and wipe your face clean.

(also serves as my frontcountry daily ritual)

green tea is especially sound, as the anti-oxidants

help to defray skin damage.

 

8:40 a.m. on November 8, 2013 (EST)
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Peppermint tea has great medicinal value for those with stomach ailments (I know from experience.). Peppermint helps you stay awake and alert (Keep a dish of peppermints on your desk at work for those long afternoons.). It can also be an appetite suppressant (Instead of grabbing a snack, suck on a peppermint.).

I haven't thought about it for bathing, which I don't bother to do for trips under a week (Sadly, I've never gone more than a week.).

No, I don't work for the peppermint industry.

11:59 a.m. on November 8, 2013 (EST)
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I make labrador tea all the time in the bush and often wash my dishes and hands with it. Never thought of bathing in it!

August 1, 2014
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