what is the advantage of a quilt over a mummy bag

6:29 p.m. on April 8, 2014 (EDT)
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Out of curiosity what is the advantage of a quilt vs a sleeping bag?  I get the concept eliminating weight by eliminating material on the bottom and the zipper, but when I look at the specs they really aren't any lighter than a mummy bag of equivalent wight.  I was looking at the nunatuk arc edge, but the sea to summit spark sp1 weights just over 12 oz and is as light as any equavilantly rated quilt.  

In addition, I'm a bit concerned about drafts since I sleep on my side and move quite a bit in my sleep.  

For someone who doesn't like to be confined in a mummy bag I could definitely see how a quilt could be more comfortable, but I don't mind mummy bags at all. 

Quilts seem to have a pretty good following with ultralight guys so I'm definatley curious to try one out.  

7:24 p.m. on April 8, 2014 (EDT)
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I am interested in trying a quilt mainly because I thrash around at night and nearly always the mummy bag is upside down by morning.  I don't know if a quilt will help me sleep better, but it can't hurt.

7:49 p.m. on April 8, 2014 (EDT)
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I use my winter bag as a quilt 90% of the time because it's overkill and rated to -15F which means I can toss and turn under it unzipped which is more comfortable than being mummified and zipped tight. 

Then when the temps go south I have the emergency option of a full mummy which can take me down to the subzeros.

I would never use a down quilt in the winter because I hate cold spots.

8:33 p.m. on April 8, 2014 (EDT)
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Not sure what you were comparing exactly, but quilts are much lighter than a sleeping bag of equal rating. Also remember not all ratings are created equal. I just checked a few random quilts from hammock gear and jacks or better and EE compared to some WM and FF bags and the quilts are all pretty consistently about 35-45% less weight than the bags, it varies a little based on options but some minimal barebones quilts are 50-60%+ less weight.

Just one example: Hammock Gear 20f burrow top quilt- 17.3oz. compared to a WM Ultralite 20f bag - 29oz -both are 850 fill and similar nylon ripstop materials

7:09 a.m. on April 9, 2014 (EDT)
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In no particular order here is my personal list of advantages:

Lighter weight

Smaller packing

Easier to balance temperatures during the night

Easier to sew if you want to make your own

Easier to get out of for that emergency 2:15am nature break you've been putting off since around 1:30am

Easier to snuggle with a partner assuming they have a quilt too :)

This Winter I took my 40°f quilt down into the teens by wearing my insulating layers to bed so while I understand why people say they won't quilt in cold weather I don't let that stop me.

The only reason I can think of to not use a quilt is because you don't want to which is a very good reason indeed.

12:31 p.m. on April 9, 2014 (EDT)
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Based on the specs I'm looking at I don't see the weight savings.  I'm looking at a lightweight bag or quilt in the 40-45 degree range for summer use.  

Nunatuk makes the lightest 40 degree quilt I could find at 12 ounces.    

the sea to summit spark 45 degree bag it is 12 oz.  

Jacks are better and a few other manufactures make 40 to 45 degree quilts that are around 1 lb 2 oz.

The mountain hardwear phantom and marmot plasma are both around 1 lb 2 oz.  

Are the 3 sleeping bag manufactures I looked at posting incorrect info while the quilt manufactures put out good info or are there lighter quilts out there that I am not seeing?   I know nunatuk makes the AT quilt at around 8 oz but I'm not counting that as it only covers you up to the waist and needs to be worn with a coat.  

I'm not familiar with a lot of the quilt manufactures but curious what is out there in the 40 degree range that weighs less than a pound?  most of the lightweight sleeping bags out there in this temp range are a hair over a pound, but I could justify a quilt if it was lighter.  Nuntuk is the only one I've found and I am considering the ARC EDGE quilt but the weight is about the same as the sea to summit spark sleeping bag which is rated the same for temperature. 

6:11 p.m. on April 9, 2014 (EDT)
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The hammock gear 40f burrow is 11.6oz. Their 50f is not listed but probably around 9-10.

The two you listed arnt the same either, one is 40f rated and the s2s is 46f rated. Also the s2s is more like a quilt than a bag, only a 1/3 zipper, and minimal to no fill on the bottom.

Also look at all specs alot of the differences you are seeing is from the quilts being wider and or longer or using a lower fill down. Have any of these cottage makers custom make a quilt at the smaller width of the nunatuk and your going to be at about the same weight.

Basically what I am saying is if you compare apples to apples you will clearly see that quilts are lighter than a sleeping bag of the same rating. Same as how a minimalist bag like the s2s is lighter than the same temp rated traditional styled bags.

I own 4 hammock gear quilts and an very very happy with them, they are perfectly suited for ground use too. I have a -10f underquilt, a 20f 3/4 length underquilt, a -10f top quilt, and a 40f topquilt.

10:16 p.m. on April 9, 2014 (EDT)
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sometimes Mountaineers will snuggle together underneath the same quilt so they save Weight. that's a little further than I'm willing to go but to each his own

10:30 p.m. on April 9, 2014 (EDT)
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FromSagetoSnow said:

sometimes Mountaineers will snuggle together underneath the same quilt so they save Weight. that's a little further than I'm willing to go but to each his own

 Guess it depends on who you're with!

6:57 a.m. on April 10, 2014 (EDT)
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sometimes Mountaineers will snuggle together underneath the same quilt so they save Weight. that's a little further than I'm willing to go but to each his own

 

If Melissa Arnott were my guide I might intentionally "forget" my sleeping bag for "weight savings" ;)

12:01 p.m. on April 10, 2014 (EDT)
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Rambler the hammock gear quilts look pretty good!   Mind if I ask a few questions about yours?

It looks like if you undo the snaps on the footbox it can be spread into a blanket.  90% of my backpacking is with my fiancée so if I went with the 55 inch version would it be practical as a blanket for two?  (in warm conditions of course) 

How would you rate the temperature ratings for hammock gear products?  Would you say they conservatively rated like like western mountaineering or Marmot or are the ratings similar to most sleeping bag ratings?  I'm looking at the 40 degree model, but if there ratings are more conservative than I may look at the 50 degree model.  

Whats you're thoughts on this for someone who sleeps on their side and tosses and turns a lot?  I'm thinking that the only option would be to add straps so I can strap it on to my sleeping pad unless there is a better way.  

12:50 p.m. on April 10, 2014 (EDT)
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You are correct, if you undo the footbox snaps and the head/neck snap it will be a blanket. I am not sure if the wide/55in would be practical for two... I think I would have to try it to know for sure. I guess if you stay somewhat spooned it would work, but would think you would probably get some drafts etc. Sorry i can be too much help with the use for two people. You may want to shoot Adam an email(owner of hammockgear) he is very responsive and will give you a no bs answer.

The temperature ratings are very accurate/conservative. Honestly, I would go with the 40f quilt regardless. The weight difference is so small, and in the event its a little on the cooler side or drafts etc you will be more comfortable. Its hard to get too hot in a quilt simply because they vent so easily, especially when unsnapped a bit and used more blanket like.The hammock gear quilts are plenty wide to accomodate a side sleepeer. I too am a side sleeper. The quilts have one snap and a draw string for the head/neck. When snapped together you can put your head through and it will stay on your shoulders very nicely.

If you have any other questions feel free to ask.

2:41 p.m. on April 10, 2014 (EDT)
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How about drafts when you are sleeping on you're side with the quilt wrapped around the pad?  

I'm assuming that for a side sleeper either blanket mode or around the pad are the only options since using it like a sleeping bag would leave you're backside exposed.

2:53 p.m. on April 10, 2014 (EDT)
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You can turn and orient the open side of the quilt to best suit your needs. Only way your back would be exposed would be if you wanted it to be. The quilts are plenty wide to tuck around and under you to prevent drafts.

10:43 a.m. on April 11, 2014 (EDT)
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I'm a side-sleeper, and Idon't like waking up with my face buried in a hood, sucking nylon.

Hammock hangers like quilts 'cause they're easier to get in and out of.

Lots of people really dislike the restriction of sleeping in a mummy.

I wonder how much weight would be saved if you did as the first MYOG pioneers did. Rip the zipper out of the S2S, and cut off it's hood?

12:10 p.m. on April 11, 2014 (EDT)
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At that point you would probably be better off just buying a purpose built quilt since the price tag on the s2s is about 298.

219 for a HG 40f burrow or 179 for the 50f.

You would probably only shave 2-3oz off the s2s tops. which is.... about exactly the same weight as the quilts if you take into account the rating difference/fill weight.

3:31 p.m. on April 11, 2014 (EDT)
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Cool, thanks!  I'm seriously considering trying out a hammock gear quilt!  Out of curiosity as a side sleeper would I be better off getting the 55 inch version?  I'm a pretty skinny guy (5'11" and 140 lbs) but not sure if I would still be better off with the extra 5 inches since I move quite a bit in my sleep.  

If I ordered one today, is it likely that I would have it before mid june?

3:59 p.m. on April 11, 2014 (EDT)
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I too am a side sleeper when i am on the ground and I find the regular 50in width adequate. However if you do move alot you might be happier with the 55in/wide. Get a old scrap towel or sheet etc and cut in to 55in first and try it then cut it to 50in wide and drape it over your shoulders etc and see what you think for yourself. That really boils down to a personal decision.

I don't know what Adam's current backlog looks like, but he is generally pretty fast. I have always recieved mine in about 2-3 weeks. Just give him a call or shoot him an email, he is very responsive as is his wife, and will be able to give you an accurate time estimate.

11:47 p.m. on April 11, 2014 (EDT)
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When I talked to Adam at Hammock Gear, he recommended the 55" for me as a 6', side sleeping, ground dweller.  I tend to lay with my bottom leg straight, and my upper leg bent, and the 55" was generous.  He also sewed loops into the sides so I could run lines under my pad to keep it tucked in.

As for timing, I ordered an underquilt this year on Mar 5, and it was shipped on Mar 13.

http://www.trailspace.com/gear/hammockgear/burrow-50/#review31093

11:49 p.m. on April 11, 2014 (EDT)
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TheRambler said:

At that point you would probably be better off just buying a purpose built quilt since the price tag on the s2s is about 298.

 I really meant it as a hypothetical ...  Guess I coulda said that ...

1:29 a.m. on April 12, 2014 (EDT)
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Ldog said:

 He also sewed loops into the sides so I could run lines under my pad to keep it tucked in.

 I've seen pictures of quilts with lines/webbing under the pad, and also a fastening arrangement around ones neck.

How do you exit the quilt/pad/tent in a hurry when 'nature calls' or 'nature really calls' - a raccoon or bear in your campsite?

;-)

5:52 a.m. on April 12, 2014 (EDT)
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John, its usually shock cord, so it stretches easily and all you have to do is just pull the quilt away like you would normally and crawl out. Its usually not cinched down really tight anyway. Myself i dont use the loops on the sides for any additional straps, but i can if i ever need to.

6:34 a.m. on April 12, 2014 (EDT)
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It is a personal choice but even in winter I have never attached my quilt to my pad.  If I roll around enough to stick something out and it gets cold I'll pull it back in.

October 25, 2014
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