Over-Rx Sunglasses for above treeline

10:25 p.m. on May 11, 2014 (EDT)
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Hi all,

My wife and I are hiking the Tour Du Mont Blanc this summer, and I need a pair of sunglasses that will fit over my prescription glasses for the trek. I was wondering if anyone had any recommendations of a quality pair that is reasonably priced? Does anyone have an alternative recommendation that would solve my problem?

 

Thanks in advance for any suggestions.  

 

 

12:11 a.m. on May 12, 2014 (EDT)
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Quality?  I buy mine at Walmart for under $15.  They are polarized, and work great for hiking, fishing, and even cycling.

 

Quality?  they work.

8:41 a.m. on May 12, 2014 (EDT)
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Okay, cool! That's easy and cheap enough! Thanks Balzaccom.

 

Still, I'll be walking at 8,200-8,500 feet for ten to eleven days. If anyone feels more specialized over-prescription glasses or alternate solutions should be used, please do chime in. I appreciate the input!

 

Vincent

9:29 a.m. on May 12, 2014 (EDT)
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UV radiation goes up 3 percent for every 1,312 feet of altitude. So, at an elevation of 8,000 feet, your risk of UV radiation increases by over 18 percent. If you are hiking in snow conditions, 80% of the UV is reflected. All that being said, I think Balz is right....just some inexpensive ones. But if you want to look at something for comparison, try the cocoons. I wear Julbo glacier glasses at altitude, but when hiling around Vegas (higher hikes here are 7k-10k ft) I just use my prescription way farers or some cheap polarized glasses.

10:29 a.m. on May 12, 2014 (EDT)
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Julbo offers getting RX lenses in your specs.....pricey though. I use these as well:

http://www.trailspace.com/gear/julbo/explorer/

11:17 a.m. on May 12, 2014 (EDT)
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I've had good luck with some of the wal-mart fit-over style glasses. As GiftoGab mentions UV is a significant hazard. A call to your optometrist could get you a recommendation for a good pair of $20 fit-overs that are polarized and will block UVA/B.


Best,

Seth Levy

1:58 p.m. on May 12, 2014 (EDT)
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Another cool place to look is zennioptical.com  First heard on Clark Howard.  You can get Rx glasses and sunglasses (or regular glasses with something like a 20%, 40% or 80% tint...so, pretty much sunglasses but in regular frames).  You just type in a few things like pupillary distance and prescription and you'll be good to go.  With shipping and option for non scratch, you could come out with $30 Rx glasses.  

You can also choose from transitions or progressive and other options for a few bucks more.  This company ships from overseas which is the reason you get them so cheap. For me, my glasses and sunglasses felt spot on with the Rx! 

About 4 or 5 of us at my accounting firm have purchased from Zenni, obviously it's a requirement that accountants wear glasses;) Just like balzaccom said about the walmart kind, quality is nothing to write home about, but definitely works.  Can't complain and if they break, you're not out $100+.

6:29 p.m. on May 12, 2014 (EDT)
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Seth said:

I've had good luck with some of the wal-mart fit-over style glasses. As GiftoGab mentions UV is a significant hazard. A call to your optometrist could get you a recommendation for a good pair of $20 fit-overs that are polarized and will block UVA/B.


Best,

Seth Levy

 Seth: The julbos I just reviewed are not polarized but block 100% of UV. Here is what the Mayo Clinic says about blocking UV:

  • When you're choosing sunglasses, look for UV-protection details on product labels. Choose sunglasses that block 99 to 100 percent of both UVA and UVB rays. Skip sunglasses that neglect to offer details about their UV protection. Keep in mind that the color and degree of darkness sunglasses provide have nothing to do with the sunglasses' ability to block UV rays. Also, opt for wraparound sunglasses or close-fitting sunglasses with wide lenses that protect your eyes from every angle. 

    Standard prescription eyeglasses in the U.S. are treated to provide UV protection while retaining a clear, nontinted appearance. Some contact lenses also offer UV protection, but should be worn in combination with sunglasses to maximize protection.

6:36 p.m. on May 12, 2014 (EDT)
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Good info here!

8:23 a.m. on May 13, 2014 (EDT)
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Thanks all for the great information! I might go with the cacoons, but I'll take a look at those bulbous as well. Thanks again!

3:41 p.m. on May 13, 2014 (EDT)
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I have always been a stickler when it comes to vision.  The ghosts, reflections and dust one gets from a single pane of eyewear is highly annoying; the additional interference from over-eyewear shades would drive me nuts.  You are investing good money in this trip to get there, why not invest in prescription sunglasses?  The view is cleaner.  Remember it is all about the view!

Ed

August 21, 2014
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