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Hiking SW US trails and rivers

2:01 a.m. on January 27, 2007 (EST)
6 reviewer rep
3 forum posts

Hello,

I will hiking Havasu Canyon and the trail to the Colorado river includes frequent river forges of 1-4 feet deep, what kind of shoes are best for this activity? It is hot and 15 miles and my experience with river sandles is they rip your feet apart after 1-2 miles

Thanks
Brian

4:17 a.m. on January 27, 2007 (EST)
0 reviewer rep
15 forum posts

I have thought about going there as well. You'll have to tell us how your trip turns out.

As for your question, I can only tell you not to wear running shoes; I wore them while backpacking in Escalante NP, Utah thinking that they would be able to dry quickly from all of the stream crossing. I will never wear them again in those conditions. Sand would fill in my shoes through the little mesh holes and it would become extremely annoying; almost enough to completely ruin my trip. Not just a little sand hear and there, but enough so that a couldn't wiggle my toes anymore. I'm not sure if the conditions will be the same, but I would think twice about wearing running shoes if you were considering them.

2:11 p.m. on January 27, 2007 (EST)
6 reviewer rep
3 forum posts

Braden,

Thanks, I did this 11 years ago and I wore canvas low top tennis shoes and socks and I did ok, no sand problems, but I hear what you are saying. I realize now not to wear mesh or anything that will allow sand in. I know people hike up the Virgin River in Zion which involves much more sand and river wading, so there must be someone out there with good information.

Brian

11:58 a.m. on January 30, 2007 (EST)
0 reviewer rep
239 forum posts

well, you could opt for a pair of wading shoes (check fly fishing supply shops) - some have rubber soles - some have felt soles (good traction on wet rocks) - some have felt soles with carbide studs in them (fantastic traction on wet rocks - I upgraded last year to a pair of these for fly fishing) - most have a neoprene cuff that keeps stream debris out of them but the light synthetic ones (look for "packable" in the description) dry really fast.

A cheaper alternative are the old vietnam style "jungle boots" - the cloth dries pretty fast - the water drains out and if you get the mesh insoles your socks actually dry out in fairly quick order.

Another may be a pair of high top "chuck taylor" sneakers (canvas) - they drain well and dry fast also - but the vent holes will let sand get into the footbed ....

2:11 a.m. on January 31, 2007 (EST)
6 reviewer rep
3 forum posts

Steve,

Thanks for the reply, do the first options that you have mentioned work well for 15 miles of hiking?

Thanks

Brian

April 21, 2014
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