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Useful or just marketing?

10:05 p.m. on March 19, 2009 (EDT)
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When i was shopping for tents it seams that some higher end mountaineering ones were compatible with an internal guying system. What's this and how does it work? Can stringing ropes inside your tent really save you from a hurricane?

From reading the posts i know a few people like to camp in windy spots ;)

 

Thanks for your help!

12:31 a.m. on March 20, 2009 (EDT)
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Hey Franc,
I've got a Marmot Citadel tent which has the ability to rig a internal guy system like you describe. As far as I know, the advantage is in the internal guying system's ability to effectively "tie together" reinforcement points on the tent. So then, with the internal system installed and the tent completely staked/guyed out, an errent 50mph gust hitting the side of your tent rather than the low end you have into the prevailing wind will not shake and rattle the frame as much. Most of the attachment points for this system in my tent are plastic d-rings attached to webbing which runs through the inner tent wall and serves as a reinforcement for the pole sleeves. Rigging the tent up like this is of course time consuming, but worth it when you don't have to worry about whether or not your shelter will hold up through the storm in the distance. Now a hurricane??? I'm not going there...

8:16 a.m. on March 20, 2009 (EDT)
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I have an older Mountain Hardwear tent. It does have an internal guy system, and when on ridges or balds I do use it.

The internal guy system is basically a form of truss, in other words it distributes wind or snow loads evenly from point to point in order to keep one side or one portion of the tent from receiving stresses that exceed the capability of the structure. It only works if the entire system is set up properly to start with.

Although the guy system bolsters the tents load ability, it too has it's limits and IS NOT intended to be used safely in true hurricane force winds.

Contact your tent manufacturer / reseller for instructions on properly setting up your tents guy system, or visit their website. Better tents should come with instructions.

10:04 a.m. on March 20, 2009 (EDT)
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Mine doesn't have one but i wanted to know if it was worth the time to sew it. A simple procedure with a single wall tent but time consuming. There's also a couple of strong velcro tabs i could use...

Does anybody know where i could get good instructions on how to set it up?

1:09 p.m. on March 20, 2009 (EDT)
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Can stringing ropes inside your tent really save you from a hurricane?...From reading the posts i know a few people like to camp in windy spots ;)

Thanks for your help!

Using one's tent in a hurricane...now I like how Franc thinks. I had a similiar idea last hurricane season. Sounds exciting Franc.

When I get a true four season tent, maybe I can join you down in one of the Gulf Coast States after my season at Devil's Lake ends.

1:13 p.m. on March 20, 2009 (EDT)
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...Although the guy system bolsters the tents load ability, it too has it's limits and IS NOT intended to be used safely in true hurricane force winds.

This theory must be tested in an actual hurricane Mr.Trouthunter.

I did learn a thing or two from those 70 mph winds we had here in southeast Ohio back in Feburary. That was just a test if you please.

Now for the real test...

10:26 p.m. on March 24, 2009 (EDT)
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I just got an email from the director of product design at Nemo and she tells me internal guylines are a very good way to strenghten this tent. I'll give it a shot!

I also added a couple of triangular guylines she said would help.

2:03 a.m. on March 26, 2009 (EDT)
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Good deal Franc!

7:31 p.m. on March 26, 2009 (EDT)
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I have had several tents with internal guying setups. The advantage is that they do help with windshedding and reducing flapping in really strong winds, and they do help with heavy snowloads (I have some photos of a friend's Stretch Dome with 2 feet of Sierra wet snow on top. only part of the tent you could see was the front vestibule door - he did not want to sleep in a snow cave like the rest of us, but ended up in one anyway!).

The disadvantage is that the guy lines reduce the usable internal space. There are several variations on the guying arrangement, some of which end up having you do contortions to get around the lines when you enter and exit the tent.

The triangular guyline arrangement works very well in high winds. Hmmm, I wonder if certain people know what the formal definition of a "hurricane" is -

10:48 p.m. on March 26, 2009 (EDT)
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Thanks for the tips! I'll be ready for Quebec's infamous hurricane season! LOL

10:23 a.m. on March 27, 2009 (EDT)
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Head down to the Gulf Coast in August-September Franc.

Last year we had several hurricanes pass through that area. Get ready to put that tent to good use then!

Meet you down at the Airy Lake Recreational Area in the Desoto National Forest!

April 17, 2014
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