Opinions on best HIKING BOOTS

1:09 p.m. on October 16, 2009 (EDT)
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I need a boot that is somewhat lightweight, WATERPROOF, and VERY durable. I would like any suggestions based on personnal experiance.

I have been using Vasque Sundowners. I am happy with them, but wondering if I can do better. I would like to stay under $200.

3:27 p.m. on October 16, 2009 (EDT)
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Now that is a very open ended question.So much depends on how your foot is shaped so there really is no simple answer to this question.First is comfort,then add lightweight and throw in durable.Light weight and durable really do not mix that well so good luck on that one unless you go with some of the newer light weight mountaineering boots.As for water proof none stay that way for long,just my experiance,and just a little deeper water than the boot is high ends that problem.My advice is find what fits well and google for reviews and other peoples experiance with said boot.Remember though that even the toughest boots dont hold up to some,some people can just about destroy anything in very short time.

4:41 p.m. on October 16, 2009 (EDT)
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Maybe it's me, but shoes are always the toughest thing to get right. I've gone in with $300 limits and always come away with something than never quite feels right... the lesser of evils. To date, Vasque boots come closest to feeling right.

5:14 p.m. on October 16, 2009 (EDT)
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It's tough to give recommendations unless we know your needs and hiking preferences. My hiking habits are as follows: 5 - 10 miles per day, marked but rough trails with a 30 -40 (maybe a little more at times) pound pack, and my trips last from 2 - 5 days. I'll go on 5 - 6 trips a season.

I've had decent luck with boots until I decided to listen to the lightweight drivel. Since then it seems like I've sacrificed support and durability. I'm in the market for a new pair for next season and I'm moving back into the 3.5 - 4 pound per pair range to get back to something more solid.

My last pair was a pair of Vasque Sundowners. They in my estimation were just good, not great. They lasted 3-4 years. The uppers abraded too quickly and the midsoles seem to have lost support. I always had problems with trail debris coming in around my ankles, and the ankle support was weak. I am aiming to fix that with my next pair. I'm looking to spend a few more dollars, too. Presently something like a Scarpa Nepal Pro looks good. It's a stout boot, but not all the way to heavy mountaineering weight. Now I just have to find it in my size (13).

I have also always gone with Gore-Tex lining and have found it worth the money.

8:11 p.m. on October 16, 2009 (EDT)
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Vasque Sundowners were at one time favorites of many hikers I knew, that is, before they started making them in China instead of Italy. It is my understanding that the quality has gone down some since then.

My own preference is to wear light weight hikers for dayhikes, and Full Grain Leather (FGL) boots for actual backpacking.

I do not like Gore-tex, it is too hot and stuffy for me, and makes it real hard to get your boots dry if you should get drenched, or step in water over the boot top, ideally you want neither, but it happens sometimes.

Which boot is right for you is going to depend on several things.

Your budget - The shape of your feet - Type of activity - Topography & climate

My personal experience is that the boots must fit!!!

So go somewhere and try on boots if at all possible, mail order can be very problematic if you don't have experience with that boot / brand already.

I have had good luck with top of the line Scarpa's, Asolo's, & Alico's. Those might be just outside your budget, but fit should be your first consideration I think.

9:31 a.m. on October 17, 2009 (EDT)
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I've had surprisingly good luck with a pair of Keen boots called Targhee Mid.

I bought on fit alone and hoped for the best on everything else. The tread and stitching have held up well, which is nice because I had read that some of the early ones got the come-aparts after a few months.

My pair came with eVent liners, but now Keen is using some other so-called waterproof/breathable fabric. I like eVent better than Gore-Tex, mainly because it seems to dry out more quickly.

I was quite fond of a pair of Vasque Clarions, but had to stop wearing them when, of all things, the interior padding in the uppers wore out, making them extremely uncomfortable.

4:35 a.m. on October 19, 2009 (EDT)
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An older pair of Vasque boots had been sitting in my closet for quite a few years. I hadn't worn them much and took them out for a break-in before a trip I was planning. When I got back to the car it felt as if I had stepped in bubble gum or tar. I looked at the soles and all seemed OK - no tar or bubblegum was found(?) When I got home I took them off and found that the mid sole was disintegrating and the heels were on the verge of tearing off. OK - several years old and no receipt but I sent them back anyway and Vasque (RedWing) sent me a brand new pair of Gore Tex Summits no questions asked. They are regular width but feel more comfortable and wider than a pair of Asolo wides I recently purchased. Every brand fits differently. The Vasque Summit feels like a very comfortable yet very sturdy boot that should last a long time. I thought it worth mentioning what terrific customer service Vasque provided.

7:06 p.m. on October 19, 2009 (EDT)
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I bought a pair of LLBean Cresta Hikers this year and have used them on multiple outings. First trip was a two-day, 22 mile trip where we ascended/descended a total of 10,000 ft in elevation. Next trip was a six day, 30 mile round trip which included offtrail scrambling in the Winds. I have gone on other dayhikes since then. They have always felt very comfortable to me, right out of the box.

 

Love the boots. They feel lightweight on my feet, in that I feel like I am wearing a shoe instead of a boot.

 

I have had no problem with blisters or hotspots with them.

 

I do use a superfeet insole with them.

2:00 a.m. on October 20, 2009 (EDT)
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I have had Meindl recommended to me a lot. They make boots in 4 categories, A, B, C and D, A being for casual use and D being a lot more hardcore. Last weekend I went camping with a friend that had just bought a pair of 'B' boots and they were really fantastic, very well made, crampon ready and with a tight fitting collar that kept his feet totally dry when we had to wade a small river.


Quite pricey though!

2:33 a.m. on October 22, 2009 (EDT)
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Vasque of past years were well made but had a definite life span.

They tended to spread out, lose firm support and became too loose.

Hiking boots by nature endure more abuse in shorter time than any regular footgear and yet we expect them to last. Asolo is a good fit perhaps a 1/2 size larger. You carry everything when hiking but hiking boots carry you 100 % of the time. Good, supportive, Gore tex lined boots that are commensurate with you weight are your first concern in hiking. If you are heavy, a lightweight boot will not provide enough support. Be wary of footgear shortcuts.

3:06 a.m. on October 22, 2009 (EDT)
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I dug out my pair of Danners and man...those things are like slippers.

10:01 a.m. on October 22, 2009 (EDT)
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If you want durability and comfort look for leather-lined boots. The leather lining quickly conforms to your feet, cushions well and isn't hot like Goretex.

Okay, now that the inner boot is ready, look at the outer. The outer for durability will have the absolute minimum amount of stitching. Many modern "boots' are made of scraps of fabric and leather. This greatly lowers costs for the maker (but not your price) and insures planned obsolescence. It is cheaper because labour to do the stitching in China is cheaper than the cost of the fabric, and no cobbling skill in both stretching leather and choosing optimum leather is required.

A on-piece leather upper is easy to keep waterproof, you don't need a sweaty Goretex liner. Not just any leather, though. Avoid Nubuck, this is a marketing ploy to capture the innocent. Nubuck is simply poorer quality or heavily scarred leather which is abraded to cover the scars and heavily pigmented to blend with other pieces.

I like Littleway stitching, but others prefer Norwegian or Goodyear. Whatever the manner of stitching upper to mid-sole, it is better than adhesive alone. The best boots also have brass, typically, screws fastening the outer sole to the midsole.

A good pair of medium weight boots as above will last the hard-traveling off-trail hiker twenty years and two pairs of soles with proper maintenance. Do the math and amortize the cost over even ten years against the patchwork eye-candy which costs almost as much and doesn't last.

JMO, YMMV

2:12 p.m. on October 22, 2009 (EDT)
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i'm deciding between another pair of vasque sundowners, or the LL Bean Crestas..They seem to be a very similar boot. I have been happy with my vasques, am i dumb to switch

2:20 p.m. on October 22, 2009 (EDT)
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There's always a chance another brand could be even better, but there's an if-it-ain't-broke-don't-fix-it component here ... only thing that would give me pause is the talk of declining quality in Vasque boots.

2:37 p.m. on October 22, 2009 (EDT)
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fatty,

As pointed out, fit is everything. However, you might want to look at http://www.sierratradingpost.com/Product.aspx?baseno=61270&cdf=TopSeller

because that is a lot of boot at a good price ($159.95 from $270.00). Leather-lined, too.Made in Italy, not China.

Merrell Wilderness is said to be okay, but $275. Danner's Mountain Light II but it has Goretex.

10:54 p.m. on October 22, 2009 (EDT)
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I have had great success with the Vasque Breeze. They give good support for both the ankle and the shank, are fairly light, and the waterproofing is good . I bought a pair for a through hike of Buffalo River National Forest and after a week on the trails they still felt good on the feet with no sore spots or blisters. Their traction really stinks on river crossings with algae covered rock though.

7:06 p.m. on October 25, 2009 (EDT)
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asolo tps 535's are under 200 but arent goretex the tps 520 is but is over 200 but they last forever ive had mine for 5 years 600 miles and they still are looking fine

10:17 p.m. on October 25, 2009 (EDT)
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I have been very happy with my Lowa Banffs in every condition I've put them in, from off-trail talus and snow to hard packed dirt; they are all leather, and fully waterproof without the need for a Goretex liner. A thick rubber rand surround the entire lower sole, and they can be resoled. They are fully leather lined, come in widths, and have exeptional build quality. Short of getting your hands on a set of Meindl Perfekts, Lowa has the best offerings in my book.

10:51 p.m. on October 25, 2009 (EDT)
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Don't buy anything made in China :D

Try Zamberlan

12:47 p.m. on October 27, 2009 (EDT)
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in the opinion of a former shoe salesman.......


THE BEST BOOTS ARE THE ONES THAT FIT!!!!! if you have to break-them-in, they don't fit. the best boots should feel stiff, right out of the box. but they should still fit the shape of your foot. if you feel like they need to "stretch" a little bit, in any area they do not fit.

all boots ( & shoes) are made off of different lasts. the last is the shape of the foot that boot (shoe) was made to fit. not every last (or foot) is the same shape. if a last was designed to fit a long narrow foot, and you have a short wide foot; it doesn't matter how much effort you put into "breaking-them-in" they ain't gonna fit. look for something that is the same shape as your foot. it doesn't matter what size they say they are; not all size 10.5D boots fit the same way. {not to mention the fact that most men are wearing the wrong size shoe anyway. but that is another conversation......}

be prepared to try on several different brands and sizes to see what fits the best, and has the features that you are looking for. also look for a store that will let you try on boots, and walk around in them for awhile. so you can make sure they fit.


there is more hiking done in germany, italy, and the rest of europe than most of the rest of the world. so it only makes sense that boots designed and made there probably have more research & quality put into them, than what is made elsewhere. take a good-long look at german and italian boots. a little more $$$$, but very well worth it. as Pillowthread mentioned "Short of getting your hands on a set of Meindl Perfekts....." the cabelas version is not the same as the "true" german version. but they are very-very close. i bought the perfekt-light hiker on close-out $160. they fit my short-wide feet right out of the box. wore them on a 5 mile boy-scout hike the day after i bought them. they may not be perfekt, but they are very-very close.


happy shopping

3:27 p.m. on October 27, 2009 (EDT)
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Don't buy anything made in China :D

Try Zamberlan

Hate to say it but soooo much is now made in china.Just think of all the USA and European products made in either Asia or Mexico,yes even a lot of VW is made in Brazil and Mexico.Hard to purchase much anymore without buying from these areas of the world.Some or their products are ok,depends on the quality control from the Brand being produced.In the end or near furure we will have little choice.

9:14 a.m. on October 30, 2009 (EDT)
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It just takes a slight effort to actually check where things actually are made. Yes European/American brands can have stuff made in China, but often it depends on what the product is, Cheap nokia phones are made in Asia, the pricier models are still made in Finland. Cheap Philips gear is made in Asia, the high end stuff is still made in the Netherlands.


The same with camping gear, Meindl make all their boots in one factory in Bavaria. I don't have anything against 'Made in China', but I try and buy Swedish made to support local factories, and it's not that hard. Usually around 30% more cost though.


Still, you cannot beat quality like you get from Woolpower or Mora.

9:57 a.m. on October 30, 2009 (EDT)
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Welcome Thomas,

I agree, I try to do the same thing. I try my best to buy gear from the region that developed or established the product line, if possible. I do not mind paying more as long as I get good quality, and I usually do. I think people who are skilled craftsmen / artisans, and who work hard, deserve the higher wages. I also do business with a couple cottage gear makers here in the US solely because I appreciate their dedication and personal touch.

To me it isn't just about saving money, I have an appreciation for well crafted gear, tools, etc. If the object I hold in my hands is cheaply made, I will not enjoy using it, I'm just funny that way.

10:05 a.m. on October 30, 2009 (EDT)
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I fitted and sold mountain boots in my final employment before I retired and I totally agree with the poster who was a shoe salesman. However, materials and build quality are also important and Meindl boots have significantly declined in that respect, as have all other Euro. boots I have seen.

The best quality boots currently available are, IMO, Hanwags and Lowas and the heavier Scarpas and these are what I would test for fit. Go to a store(s) dedicated to mountain gear and/ or R.E.I. and take your time testing/trying until you find comfort and THEN worry about price.

11:43 a.m. on October 30, 2009 (EDT)
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I bought a pair of Lowa's a few years back. The tread wore out much quicker than I would expect and the company refused to replace them. I'm now a Merrell-wearer because of price and the fact that they're hikable straight from the box, no break-in required.

2:11 p.m. on November 6, 2009 (EST)
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I own a pair of Danner Mountain Light II. Very nice. I got them for $177 (shipped) with a coupon on shoebuy.com.

11:50 p.m. on November 8, 2009 (EST)
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I use Asolo Acttiva GTX and they work great for me

3:16 a.m. on November 9, 2009 (EST)
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I have the Asolo 520 GTX - don't know if they still make that particular model, but sure they have something similar, if not the same boot/different moniker. I have a standard 10.5 D foot, no high arches, flat feet, or other "deformities" to deal with. These boots have performed wonderfully for about 8 yrs and are still trailworthy, though they look like crap (i'm not much on cleaning or conditioning) - but I did recently have to replace laces. Definitely getting my moneys worth. One thing I highly recommend regardless of what boot you go with, get a pair of green Superfeet inserts... fit/feel of my boots went from great to heavenly when i added those.

2:33 p.m. on November 9, 2009 (EST)
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Superfeet inserts are good, but not for everyone - especially not for supinators - people who walk more on the outside of their feet. However most people over-pronate (walk more on the inside), and this can lead to problems like Plantar fascitis (fallen arches). Superfeet can help this. They also cradle the heel better than most stock footbeds, which minimises slip - especially if the heel is a little large. HOwever they can raise the heel too much in some cases, which can actually lift the hele out of the heel cup, increasing the likelihood of heel slip. In these instance, it is better to stick with the stock footbed or look for a different pair of boots.

7:00 p.m. on November 9, 2009 (EST)
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The catch is "very durable". And I'm glad no one mentioned the "fantastic" qualities of the Limmer boot. (Since I had a pair several years ago that blew out in the first 8 months--long story with poor customer service). I had a pair of Sundowners that lasted 12 months and they ended up duct taped with a rip across the toe. Currently I'm on a Asolo Fugitive(winter), FSN 95(rest of year)jag and find them to fit well with one size locked in so I can order new pairs online just with the size number.

Very durable? Heck no, each pair lasts, for me, about 2 years, before the tread's smooth and rips happen on top. But compared to the Limmer and so many other boots, they fit right out of the box w/o much break-in time.

9:25 p.m. on November 9, 2009 (EST)
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Superfeet inserts are good, but not for everyone - especially not for supinators - people who walk more on the outside of their feet. However most people over-pronate (walk more on the inside), and this can lead to problems like Plantar fascitis (fallen arches). Superfeet can help this. They also cradle the heel better than most stock footbeds, which minimises slip - especially if the heel is a little large. HOwever they can raise the heel too much in some cases, which can actually lift the hele out of the heel cup, increasing the likelihood of heel slip. In these instance, it is better to stick with the stock footbed or look for a different pair of boots.

hold on, let me go get my podiatry reference manual so i can use some 12-cylinder technical terms - did you miss the part in my post where i qualified that I had normal feet?

9:31 p.m. on November 9, 2009 (EST)
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The catch is "very durable". And I'm glad no one mentioned the "fantastic" qualities of the Limmer boot. (Since I had a pair several years ago that blew out in the first 8 months--long story with poor customer service). I had a pair of Sundowners that lasted 12 months and they ended up duct taped with a rip across the toe. Currently I'm on a Asolo Fugitive(winter), FSN 95(rest of year)jag and find them to fit well with one size locked in so I can order new pairs online just with the size number.

Very durable? Heck no, each pair lasts, for me, about 2 years, before the tread's smooth and rips happen on top. But compared to the Limmer and so many other boots, they fit right out of the box w/o much break-in time.

Thanks for the heads-up on those. I'd heard tons of folks gush over Limmers (probly more from what they heard than experienced) to the point I was considering getting on the waiting list and making the Limmer mid-weight my next boot. Almost got suckered in by the hype. Will have to step back and re-evaluate. Good info!

2:38 p.m. on November 10, 2009 (EST)
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I had the midweight Limmer and here's what happened: After about 10 backpacking trips, the heavy duty welt thread broke on both boot soles and they starting "flapping in the wind." Since I was out when it happened, I squirted in a bit of seam sealer glue to join each piece and when I got home I called the Big Boys in New Hampshire.

We talked and I told them about the welt thread and a head honcho said, to paraphrase, "We had a short run of boots where we used unwaxed welt thread and that's probably what happened with yours." Of course, the fine print also said any glue used to fix the boots voids the warranty. Uh oh. Waxed thread would've kept the threads from cutting, etc. I also had some leather in the inside heel portion split and torn open which they fixed.

$100 later I got my boots back(should've been covered), and here's the kicker, as soon as I went out for a hike, the rubber heel glued onto the sole pulled away enough to notice.

8:25 p.m. on November 10, 2009 (EST)
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Walter,

The problem is not the boots, it's your stride. If you used the "Approved Hikers' Stride" (AHS) your boots would never wear out.

8:41 p.m. on November 10, 2009 (EST)
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Tipi,

Your experience with Limmers is quite the opposite of mine. Barb has had her current pair for about 4 or 5 years, and they are standing up well (though I suppose I shouldn't include the past year of housebuilding, since we didn't get out anywhere our usual amount during that time). It is also opposite the experience of everyone else I know who has had Limmers. I suppose, though, that even the best manufacturers occasionally get a bad batch of the materials or have some workers who have a bad day or should not have been hired in the first place.

Your comment about the customer service is interesting, since I just had a rather nasty go-around with my now-former video provider. While we were rebuilding the house and living in a nearby rental house, we moved the service to the rental for the year. For whatever reason, their equipment failed every 2 to 4 weeks, requiring visits from the technical service people. We had had no problems during the 7 years previous to the move. But the service was bad enough that when we moved back into the rebuilt house, we told the video service to buzz off, we were not moving it to the new house. The "customer service" rep made no apology for the bad service, in fact quoting a fine print paragraph that said that loss of service "for any reason, including acts of God, ..." and a couple lines more, ending with "or any other reason" was not their responsibility. Ummm, excuse me? This is "customer service"? I have occasionally run into this kind of attitude with other companies, but only rarely, and in the outdoor world, almost never.

9:20 p.m. on November 10, 2009 (EST)
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Walter,

The problem is not the boots, it's your stride. If you used the "Approved Hikers' Stride" (AHS) your boots would never wear out.

I tried every stride I could think of to compensate, even went thru the Four Gaits of the AHS:

1) The Squirting Duck Walk(under blowdowns).

2) The Mincing Step Shuffle(going uphill with an 80lb pack).

3) The favoried wide stride of the 30 mile-a-day ultralighters(stopped due to tunnel vision and deep despair).

4) The Creeping Downhill Bung-Abseil(whereupon a trained bung-muscle self arrests--don't ask).

11:20 p.m. on November 10, 2009 (EST)
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Cheffy said:

Superfeet inserts are good, but not for everyone - especially not for supinators - people who walk more on the outside of their feet. However most people over-pronate (walk more on the inside), and this can lead to problems like Plantar fascitis (fallen arches). Superfeet can help this. They also cradle the heel better than most stock footbeds, which minimises slip - especially if the heel is a little large. HOwever they can raise the heel too much in some cases, which can actually lift the hele out of the heel cup, increasing the likelihood of heel slip. In these instance, it is better to stick with the stock footbed or look for a different pair of boots.

hold on, let me go get my podiatry reference manual so i can use some 12-cylinder technical terms - did you miss the part in my post where i qualified that I had normal feet?

Not sure why you feel the need to be defensive for no particular reason here. I am merely qualifying your experience with superfeet for other people reading this thread with no experience in the matter - it wasn't for your purposes. If you like the insoles, great. I too use them, and enjoy their support. But for some people they are not only unnecessary, but can actually create problems - especially if they supinate.

11:25 p.m. on November 10, 2009 (EST)
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I had the midweight Limmer and here's what happened: After about 10 backpacking trips, the heavy duty welt thread broke on both boot soles and they starting "flapping in the wind." Since I was out when it happened, I squirted in a bit of seam sealer glue to join each piece and when I got home I called the Big Boys in New Hampshire.

We talked and I told them about the welt thread and a head honcho said, to paraphrase, "We had a short run of boots where we used unwaxed welt thread and that's probably what happened with yours." Of course, the fine print also said any glue used to fix the boots voids the warranty. Uh oh. Waxed thread would've kept the threads from cutting, etc. I also had some leather in the inside heel portion split and torn open which they fixed.

$100 later I got my boots back(should've been covered), and here's the kicker, as soon as I went out for a hike, the rubber heel glued onto the sole pulled away enough to notice.


That's really too bad to hear about this. I suspect your experience is not typical in terms of problems with the quality of the product, but certainly unfortunate in their response, and for the price the product cost would certainly put me off. That being said, I am strongly contemplating buying a pair of Limmers right now - trying to decide between the mid-weights and the light-weights.

10:46 a.m. on November 11, 2009 (EST)
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The one good thing about Limmers is that one pair, with periodic repairs, can last you 20 years. This can not be said for almost every other boot out there. Put a new sole on an Asolo? Good luck. And even if you did, the uppers won't last very long anyway.

I used my Limmers for many backpacking trips and probably didn't get the initial out-of-the-store fit right, but here's my impressions:

** My feet got quite sore after walking all day and "not as sore" as in the Asolos(cushioned insoles might help).

** No matter how much Limmer boot grease I smeared on the things, I never could get them waterproof. I always had wet socks with the Limmers, not so much with the GTX Asolos.

** Limmer is a full leather boot and we know what happens when a soaken wet leather boot freezes solid: it's a hateful brick. Heavy and cold and stiff. The Asolos are made with fabric patches allowing a frozen boot to be a bit more flexible and thawing quicker.

** Limmer has vibram soles which most people swear by but which I find to be worse on wet rocks than the softer rubber of the Asolos(but they wear quicker).

10:47 a.m. on November 11, 2009 (EST)
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Walter,

I would have thought that you would have derived some benefit from those steps. However, the final chapter of the guide of the AHS lists the "Assertive Re-decision Non-contact Float" as the optimum sole-saving stride.

The ARNF begins with a normal stride with the left foot; however, a nanosecond before the boot sole makes contact with the ground, re-decide your action and move the right foot forward, without altering the position of your left foot. Again, before boot-strike, move the other foot forward, and so on. With this technique you make excellent mileage yet, because neither boot ever touches the ground, there is only some incidental friction wear from passage through the air. Obviously, getting in another hiker's slipstream will reduce even that.

This seeming levitation is made possible by the principle that because you fully intended to take the complete step - assertively - the universe had prepared for that. However, your quick re-decision went unnoticed by gravity - in the grand welter of other cosmic events - leaving your foot suspended in air.

11:07 a.m. on November 11, 2009 (EST)
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Walter,

Your Limmer issue never would have occurred with Littleway stitching, which is why I prefer the Pivettas and Vasques that had Littleway stitching.

As you can see, there is no welt. The stitching is all inside, protected from abrasion and leakage. I never had my Pivettas leak unless I overtopped them in a stream or slush.

Littleway is more expensive, but boot break-in is faster, IMO.

3:50 p.m. on November 11, 2009 (EST)
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Lot of nerve you have; accuse me of being an incompetent dolt with no footwear acumen, then deny it.... shameful! Just kidding - I should've put a smiley face after my other post - no problem - it's all good - happy trails!

3:51 p.m. on November 11, 2009 (EST)
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Walter,

I would have thought that you would have derived some benefit from those steps. However, the final chapter of the guide of the AHS lists the "Assertive Re-decision Non-contact Float" as the optimum sole-saving stride.

The ARNF begins with a normal stride with the left foot; however, a nanosecond before the boot sole makes contact with the ground, re-decide your action and move the right foot forward, without altering the position of your left foot. Again, before boot-strike, move the other foot forward, and so on. With this technique you make excellent mileage yet, because neither boot ever touches the ground, there is only some incidental friction wear from passage through the air. Obviously, getting in another hiker's slipstream will reduce even that.

This seeming levitation is made possible by the principle that because you fully intended to take the complete step - assertively - the universe had prepared for that. However, your quick re-decision went unnoticed by gravity - in the grand welter of other cosmic events - leaving your foot suspended in air.

Jeeez, ya'll stop it - ROFL!!! - usually have to pay money for this kind of entertainment

3:52 p.m. on November 11, 2009 (EST)
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pburse said:

Cheffy said:

Superfeet inserts are good, but not for everyone - especially not for supinators - people who walk more on the outside of their feet. However most people over-pronate (walk more on the inside), and this can lead to problems like Plantar fascitis (fallen arches). Superfeet can help this. They also cradle the heel better than most stock footbeds, which minimises slip - especially if the heel is a little large. HOwever they can raise the heel too much in some cases, which can actually lift the hele out of the heel cup, increasing the likelihood of heel slip. In these instance, it is better to stick with the stock footbed or look for a different pair of boots.

hold on, let me go get my podiatry reference manual so i can use some 12-cylinder technical terms - did you miss the part in my post where i qualified that I had normal feet?

Not sure why you feel the need to be defensive for no particular reason here. I am merely qualifying your experience with superfeet for other people reading this thread with no experience in the matter - it wasn't for your purposes. If you like the insoles, great. I too use them, and enjoy their support. But for some people they are not only unnecessary, but can actually create problems - especially if they supinate.

Lot of nerve you have; accuse me of being an incompetent dolt with no footwear acumen, then deny it.... shameful! Just kidding - I should've put a smiley face after my other post - no problem - it's all good - happy trails!

5:44 p.m. on November 11, 2009 (EST)
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Cheffy!!

I'll bite. Why, exactly, would a supinator not want superfeet insoles? Would that same person not want SOLE insoles? I currently use both of these types on insoles, and I supinate like "the dickens." The dynamic motions my feet can perform make heel slip everpresent. Everything I've seen prior to your post leads me to believe I'm doing the right thing to try to correct/control my issue; your entry, however, has created a bit of cognitive dissonance within the ol' brain bucket. For reference I'm 165, 6'2", with high arched, "A" width, low-volume feet.

8:54 p.m. on November 18, 2009 (EST)
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Hello,

I figured I would ask my question here instead of in a new thread.

I work for a land management agency in southern NM (rough terrain, seldom have wet/cold conditions). I hike 2-3 times a week on average on anything from flat ground to near verticle loose slopes, with a light load but sometimes up to 45 lbs in my pack.

I need a boot that will last me a while (The tread on my current pair lasted 1 year). I am looking for something with a sole that withstand mesquite and cactus but will not leave my foot tender after a full day of walking on loose rocks. I would also prefer something lightweight as most of my hiking is in hot dry weather.

Any suggestions?

I own a pair of Danner Flashpoints (for firefighting) which have the durability I need, but still kill my feet after a full day with 2 pairs of wool socks and moleskin where I know I'll get blisters.

12:47 p.m. on November 19, 2009 (EST)
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I own a pair of Danner Flashpoints (for firefighting) which have the durability I need, but still kill my feet after a full day with 2 pairs of wool socks and moleskin where I know I'll get blisters.

 


if you can fit 2 pairs of wool sox in a boot, than either you are making your boots too small (by putting too much stuff inside) or you are buying them too big (and compensating with more sox). somewhere nearby you there has to be either a good shoe or gear store. have your foot re-measured and re-fitted.

this sounds like a situation where you are going in and buying the same size you have been wearing for years. even though your feet have changed and you need a different size. amazing how many men think they wear a size 10.5D and when fitted correctly actually need a size 12B.

hopefully this helps

5:04 p.m. on November 19, 2009 (EST)
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even though your feet have changed and you need a different size.

My feet have shrunk in size from a 13 wide to about 11.5 since i started using custom footbeds. I had to buy 3 pairs of boot that were too big before i finally understood the problem. Now i have a bunch of size 13s that just don't fit anymore. Wish i caught the problem sooner...

9:05 p.m. on November 19, 2009 (EST)
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I actually bought those boots a full size smaller than what I wear for everyday use. I wear a pair of wool socks and a pair of thin merino liners (should have been more clear on that). Anyway, any suggestions for boots?

8:37 p.m. on November 29, 2009 (EST)
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Cheffy!!

I'll bite. Why, exactly, would a supinator not want superfeet insoles? Would that same person not want SOLE insoles? I currently use both of these types on insoles, and I supinate like "the dickens." The dynamic motions my feet can perform make heel slip everpresent. Everything I've seen prior to your post leads me to believe I'm doing the right thing to try to correct/control my issue; your entry, however, has created a bit of cognitive dissonance within the ol' brain bucket. For reference I'm 165, 6'2", with high arched, "A" width, low-volume feet.

Sorry for the late reply. Superfeet offer pronation control in the form of heel stability (raising the heel, cupping it) and arch support. This in effect prevents the foot from flattening, and produce a more neutral gait. The same features may over-compensate for at supinator, especially if they have high rigid arches, which is often the case. If you have rigid arches not only do you not need hard arch support, it may be uncomfortable. In addition, the raised heel puts more stress on the forefoot - in a pronator, this is compensating. In a supinator, the forefoot is already over-stressed due to the lack flex in the arch - consequently, emphasising this further can be painfull. Supinators need a softer forefoot cushioning to compensate for the greater pressure in this area.

I'm not claiming to be an expert by any means, but this seems to be the consensus by what I've read and come to understand about my own feet. I over-pronate BTW, though not terribly, so I'm now buying footwear with better arch-support and superfeet where needed to help prevent plantar fascitis.

8:38 p.m. on November 29, 2009 (EST)
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Lot of nerve you have; accuse me of being an incompetent dolt with no footwear acumen, then deny it.... shameful! Just kidding - I should've put a smiley face after my other post - no problem - it's all good - happy trails!

Sorry, didn't pick up on the humour. Happy trails! :)

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