Sleeping Bag insulation question

4:43 p.m. on December 3, 2010 (EST)
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I have an old inexpensive Coleman Sleeping Bag (8-12 years old, I think).

Does anyone know what kind of insulation this is?

I am trying to identify the insulation, because I need this type of material for a new outdoor product I'm developing.

The insulation does NOT have loft.  It is about 1/4-1/2 inch thick, & it keeps it's shape (i.e. it behaves a bit like a rolled out piece of house insulation - soft & pliable, but with a slight rigidity).

Any help would be appreciated.


Coleman-Bag-Insul-I.jpg

Coleman-Bag-Insul-II.jpg

Coleman-Bag-Insul-III.jpg

6:18 p.m. on December 3, 2010 (EST)
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I would suggest you contact Coleman and ask them, here is their contact info:

Toll Free
1-800-835-3278
Monday - Thursday CST
7:00am - 11:30am
12:30pm - 4:45pm
Friday
7:00am - 11:30am
12:30pm - 4:00pm

 

Here is a link to their website, you can E-mail them from there:

http://www.coleman.com/coleman/ColemanCom/DearColeman2.asp

I hope you get the info you need.

 

10:03 p.m. on December 3, 2010 (EST)
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Thanks for  the reply. 

I had tried calling them earlier today.  The tag is missing, & the person on the phone said that he couldn't help me without the manufacturer's tag.  I asked to speak to an engineer/designer, & was refused that.

It's a bureacracy, so I wasn't holding my breath.

2:29 a.m. on December 4, 2010 (EST)
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Pretty sure it's Thinsulate. Used primarily in clothing insulation due to it being less bulky. Yet it did find it's way in sleeping bag insulation years ago.

9:59 a.m. on December 4, 2010 (EST)
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Thanks for  the reply. 

I had tried calling them earlier today.  The tag is missing, & the person on the phone said that he couldn't help me without the manufacturer's tag.  I asked to speak to an engineer/designer, & was refused that.

It's a bureacracy, so I wasn't holding my breath.

Well someone simply sitting in front of a computer would need the tag info to look up the information you need, however someone more knowledgeable could probably identify the insulation simply by looking at it. Aside from trying other methods to ID the insulation, I would mail some of it to Coleman. Of course how far you wish to pursue that is up to you.

11:51 a.m. on December 4, 2010 (EST)
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How specific do you need to get on naming the insulation?  In general it appears to be some type of fiberfill synthetic insulation.  Names keep changing and they keep trying to improve it but it is all similar enough to be lumped together in my book. 

My guess is that it had more loft when you bought it and has compressed somewhat.  That is typical of this type of insulation.

4:11 p.m. on December 4, 2010 (EST)
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There's a good chance it is some version of Polargard, which has been around for a long time. Do a search for synthetic insulation and you can read about the various brands. Coleman has something called Coletherm, a hollow core insulation of some kind.

By comparison, a Coleman mummy bag is rated by them as +20F with 25 oz of Coletherm, while a WM down bag with 26 oz of down is rated at +5F.  WM has several bags rated to 15F with varying amounts of down from 17-27 oz, the difference being the length and other dimensions of the bag. The cost is much higher, of course,

11:46 p.m. on December 7, 2010 (EST)
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What is a good insulation to look for when buying a bag?

2:09 a.m. on December 8, 2010 (EST)
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What is a good insulation to look for when buying a bag?

Depends on several factors. The commonly used decision tree is this: cheap, light, warm; pick two.

Then factor in where you are going to be using the bag and under what conditions. Depending on the answer to these questions, you can then decide if you need a synthetic bag instead of down.

On backpacking forums, probably the most talked about topics are stoves, water filtration, sleeping bags and tents.

If you do a search here or on any other backpacking site, you will find plenty of threads on bags and the different insulations used in them. If you look at any of the sites of the major manufacturers, you will see that they offer synthetic and down bags in various models and at various prices. There are hundreds of bags to choose from ranging from inexpensive bags you'd find in a big box store like Wal-Mart up to high end down bags from specialty manufacturers like Western Mountaineering, Feathered Friends or Valandre.

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