Insulating Layer

9:18 p.m. on March 24, 2011 (EDT)
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Got some great info from you folks on here about a jacket.

Ended up picking up an arcteryx alpha lt in grey because it was 40% off.

 

I am looking for an insulating layer to take up with me to northern BC in september on my quest for stone sheep.

 

I will have an underarmour base layer, a stanfield ( wool layer), The insulating layer I am looking for, and my Arcteryx jacket,

 

I will spend long hours glassing up on ridge tops, and temps will be between -5 to 15, so I want to have the option of putting on something warm if the colder hits.

 

I have been looking at down and synthetic jackets.  Don't really need a hood, I was thinking less than 1.5lbs, and something that will pack up decently.

 

I like the idea of down, I have heard it is warmer than synthetic, and I know it packs better, and I plan on having a dry bag for it in my pack, and when wearing i will have my shell on, but some still say things happen and reccomend the synthetic,  what do you guys think??

 

Synthetic or down?  and what sort of weight should I be looking at for these temps?

 

THANKS!!

 

 

 

12:01 a.m. on March 25, 2011 (EDT)
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7:12 a.m. on March 25, 2011 (EDT)
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I would recommend several mid layers; if down is one of them make sure others are wool or fleece, so in the advent you get wet you still have something that will be warm.  I also would suggest going with a soft shell over a hard shell, given the cold temps you will be operating in, as the water repelling characteristics of hard shells tend to cause moisture to condense in you mid layers.

Ed

9:08 a.m. on March 25, 2011 (EDT)
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Id go with a synthetic jacket and wool mid layer. If you're standing still for long periods of time condensation wont happen as fast than if you were moving. Still, bring extra layers so you can change or add up. I like Ed's idea about the soft shell, getting one for your hike in would be ideal. If youre on a budget, just bring more layer to change when you get to your destination.

2:50 p.m. on March 28, 2011 (EDT)
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Light-to-mid-weight wool.   I've stumbled-upon a few cashmere sweaters in "thrift-stores" ( This was in The Hamptons, of Long Island -- "playground of the rich & famous"... and, where I've scored Armani suits for $50!   I lived there for most of my life.).   Cashmere is the finest wool extant.   Incredibly light and warm; plus it 'breathes'.   Ten-bucks apiece.

 

Baring you're not as fortunate as I was, I like mid-layers with PrimaLoft synthetic insulation.   Not as often seen, but worth looking for.   It's advertised as "synthetic down", without down's propensity of holding moisture.

 

r2

12:02 p.m. on March 29, 2011 (EDT)
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Yea I ordered the Kuiu spindrift jacket.

 

I will have a merino base layer, and an Under armour as spare.

Regular wool mid layer, a fleece, and my primaloft 1 spindrift.

Then my arcteryx alpha lt

9:34 p.m. on March 29, 2011 (EDT)
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Well, I doubt very much that you will hunt Stone's in temps. such as -5 to 15*, as my experience in northern BC in Sept. has shown temps to be more from 25-60*; this is an American site and they still, as we should, use the old and superior Imperial System.....

I have three Primaloft jackets from ID, one Ultralight synthetic from Montbell, a real gem at about 9 0z and one superb double duvet in down from Richard Egge of Switzerland and have owned/used srveral others.

I like the availabilty of a hood for glassing/hunting and hanging out on mountain tops and ridges, with many forest fire lookouts and a CCG lighthouse under my belt, I have spent a lot of time glassing.

My choice for my next jacket, will be without question, the Westcomb Himalayan Hoody in Primloft and I will get a Westcomb eVent Cruiser hardshell to go over it. These come in a deep grey they call "cinder" and, frankly, dull "earthtone" colours are every bit as effective in big game hunting, especially in mountainous terrain than any of the new, trendy camo patterns.

Kuiu is interesting gear, I suspect that it is made in the same factory as Westcomb and I expect it to be first class in quality and performance and you should be very happy with your new acquisition. I will buy some of their merino tops in the lighter earth shades as I love merino and even wear light T's and "gonch" made from it on hot summer hikes, works better than anything and smells nice.

7:27 a.m. on March 30, 2011 (EDT)
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I think we're seeing a pattern here ....

 

Wool (merino) and PrimaLoft are very excellent.   Well worth the expense.

 

Forsake the fleece stuff.

10:33 p.m. on March 30, 2011 (EDT)
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I think we're seeing a pattern here ....

 

Wool (merino) and PrimaLoft are very excellent.   Well worth the expense.

 

Forsake the fleece stuff.

 I have all three, and would say that top-quality fleece should not be forsaken. Polartech Thermal Pro High-loft is exceptionally warm, wicks very well, and compresses easily. I prefer it for its warmth and moisture transfer abilities when engaged in moderate activity during very cold weather. It is expensive as well.

An ultralight down sweater cannot be beat when you summit or reach an extended resting point and are not exerting yourself. Plus it packs down to nothing. Just make sure that you're dry before you put it on.

Congrats on your purchase. You will be very happy with that jacket.

11:01 p.m. on March 30, 2011 (EDT)
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 I have come to dislike fleece, namely because of the residual "stinky-poo's" that are part-and-parcel of this product.    It is difficult to get the odor out.  

 

I went on a 10-day hike of the AT in Maine last Autumn.   "Bird-bathed" and wiped the 'ole baud regularly with eco-friendly / flushable wipes and sanitizing alcohol gels.   Not bad, given the circumstances.  

 

On the drive back to Maryland (home), I couldn't help but notice the stench emanating from the pile of fleece in the back of my VW Westy.   I stopped in The Hamptons (Long Island) to see an old girlfriend, and used her washer.   A day-or-two later, on my way back to Maryland, I still noticed odor.   When back home, I again washed the fleeces  ('fleeci" ?), as per the prescribed method ... even with the recommended dedicated products.  Eventually, after several washings, I think (?) I got rid of the odor.

 

Too much of a hassle.  I'm now firmly entrenched in the WOOL camp.  Just picked-up another couple sets of Ibes and Icebreaker woolies ( $$$, but worth it).   "End of Winter Sale" at local (Annapolis) outdoor store.

1:26 a.m. on April 1, 2011 (EDT)
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I'm with you on synthetics when it comes to odor. I almost always wear woolies as a base layer for sure. Atsko Sport Wash seems to get rid of the odors with ease for me.

I've found that a lightweight merino baselayer keeps the odors at bay in my mid/outer layers, even my polartec fleece midlayers and powershield soft shells.  There is no question that for longer trips and through hikes, merino is much more appealing to one's olfactory system.

7:14 a.m. on April 1, 2011 (EDT)
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Also, nothing beats wool for when you have really worked-up a sweat.

As XterroBrando suggested, a lightweight merino baselayer does keep the odor "at bay".  

Add a mid-layer of another mid-weight merino, and you can cool-down without chilling.

 

 

 

r2

6:31 p.m. on April 1, 2011 (EDT)
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The OP is asking about a garment for northern British Columbia and this is among the coldest, wettest and most remote true wilderness regions left in North America. I started working alone in the very remote area there north of Stewart, BC-Hyder, AK, 39 years ago and have spent a fair amount of time there, in solo stints from a couple of weeks to three months without break and I know what works there, down ain't it.

I started using fleece a few years after this, circa '77, have used it all over BC, into the Yukon and northern Alberta and the "Eastern Slopes" of the Rockies and, again, for stints of months alone in the bush. I have lots of highend fleece left and have given most of it to my nephews and their friends as it is not really a very good mountain or backpacking garment, IME.

I won't buy anymore fleece and have not for quite some years, I dress in merino wool, then Primaloft then eVent and have yet to find a combo that works as well or is as light and compressible to pack as this. Stone's Sheep are among THE ultimate quarry for mountain hunters and require days and even weeks of hard mountain trekking to even find one, the most efficient clothing assists greatly in this quest and, having done it, this is what I consider best.

10:24 p.m. on April 1, 2011 (EDT)
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The OP is asking about a garment for northern British Columbia and this is among the coldest, wettest and most remote true wilderness regions left in North America. I started working alone in the very remote area there north of Stewart, BC-Hyder, AK, 39 years ago and have spent a fair amount of time there, in solo stints from a couple of weeks to three months without break and I know what works there, down ain't it.

I started using fleece a few years after this, circa '77, have used it all over BC, into the Yukon and northern Alberta and the "Eastern Slopes" of the Rockies and, again, for stints of months alone in the bush. I have lots of highend fleece left and have given most of it to my nephews and their friends as it is not really a very good mountain or backpacking garment, IME.

I won't buy anymore fleece and have not for quite some years, I dress in merino wool, then Primaloft then eVent and have yet to find a combo that works as well or is as light and compressible to pack as this. Stone's Sheep are among THE ultimate quarry for mountain hunters and require days and even weeks of hard mountain trekking to even find one, the most efficient clothing assists greatly in this quest and, having done it, this is what I consider best.

 

I hear 'ya.

I did the same, more-or-less.   Got rid of the fleece (to charitable orgainizations) and won't buy any more.

I'm not with you, though, on the hunting-thing.

I'm a vegetarian (over 35 years).   My admonition: Love animals -- don't eat them.

Hunting for 'sport' is something I don't advocate ... unless, of course, the animals could shoot back.   Hunting is a very 'red-necky' thing in my part of the country.   Lotsa  fat ' good 'ole boys' driving jacked-up pick-up trucks, with insanely loud exhaust systems. 

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