PONCHOs ? -- tawk to me 'bout 'em

10:29 a.m. on May 11, 2011 (EDT)
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Ever-curious, I wonder if a PONCHO is another gear item worthy of consideration, as a "must have" (to tote-along on most hiking excursions).

Ex-military types swear by them.

Comments ??

Yogi Robt

11:26 a.m. on May 11, 2011 (EDT)
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I always carry my poncho. I think its a must hav item. Here in the SW deserts rain is not  always a worry and if it does it usually doent last to long so poncho works pretty well. If Im expecting heavy rain I bring the rainsuit too. When not in use for rain protection it works great for a tent footprint, wind block, or set up for shade. My poncho is pretty thick and heavy (4x8 PVC w/groumets) but needs to be to stand up to the desert sticky and pricklies. Ive had this poncho for years, not a tear in it and has kept  me dry. The down side to ponchos is your boots are gonna get double the rain so good water proof boots is a must.  Think I only paid about $20 for it.   

4:09 p.m. on May 11, 2011 (EDT)
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Ponchos are great and also very bad all at the same time, but it all depends on the conditions.

Generally speaking they are great. They are light weight and breath very well. Alot of them are not the most durable so I would make sure you get a higher quality one.

The Cons. If its windy they blow all around like crazy. If you are hiking off trail or in an area with alot of briars or other thick brush along the trail your poncho will probably not survive too long. The other con to ponchos, is i like my items to be dual purpose. I typically use my rain shell as a wind shell in camp also, and to be quite honest I don't find ponchos all that comfortable for lounging around camp in no matter the conditions. I prefer a actual rain shell most of the time.

I like using a poncho in warm weather when I am on established trails. Off trail use i never bring a poncho.

7:02 a.m. on May 12, 2011 (EDT)
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I think ponchos are over rated, and prefer a rain suit any day.  As for their dual use capabilities, it is pretty hard to use it for anything else, when you are wearing it in the rain.

Ed

7:15 a.m. on May 12, 2011 (EDT)
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Robert Rowe said:

Ever-curious, I wonder if a PONCHO is another gear item worthy of consideration, as a "must have" (to tote-along on most hiking excursions).

Ex-military types swear by them.

Comments ??

Yogi Robt

 There IS a fascination with ponchos by the ex-military types.  I had a friend back in the 1980's who was first sgt in the SF at Fifth Group when it was at Bragg and who pulled two tours in Vietnam, one with the 173rd in '67 and another with SF in '69.  He "souvineer-ed" me gear now and then, a field jacket, a jacket liner, a blouse with the SF patch, etc, but he would never part with his poncho and poncho liner. Or his beret, of course.  He lived in the poncho and the poncho liner while he was in-country and used them as a combination tent and bivy sac and umbrella. He had a technique of placing the two together and rolling up in both to stay warm and "dry" during patrols.

Like everyone else, I went the poncho route for a couple years and thought it to be a necessary and even important item in the kit.  Wrong.  Newbs swear by them, old hands swear at them.  I had several kinds, one a butt-cheap BSA pvc piece of crap which smelled like plastic and one morning at -10F it broke into several pieces like a saltine cracker as I tried to fold it up.

There are at least two kinds of military ponchos, the heavy "rubberized canvas" type, and the newer Vietnam-era urethane nylon type.  For some reason I went years carrying one of these newer ones and found it terrible for rain protection but great for covering my tent when stealth camping where I shouldn't be tent camping.  It's one of those items which says, "Dang it, you'll need me someday for camouflage or ground cloth or picnic blanket or dayhiker body bag or to make you feel officially like a hard-core outdoorsman---" and so I humped the heavy thing for years.

I DID use several lashed together to make an excellent portable tipi cover once, and prided myself on having a stash of many as a sort of end-times 401K retirement plan.  A woodstove, ten cords of wood, and several army ponchos---all a person needs to survive armageddon.

10:32 p.m. on May 13, 2011 (EDT)
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Well once again TS and its members hav given me some good food for thought. Ive been forced to rethink my Poncho/Tarp.

My P/T is definitly from the days when first getting into Packing. Im talk'n back when I was much younger, bolder and down right broke. Couldnt afford to buy all kinds of gear, heck the $20 for the P/T was a major investment. It was one of my vital pieces of gear, the only protection against moisture. It covered my Big Fat Syn bag tied outside the Kmart external frame pack (best ever Xmas gift), covered me in the rain, was thrown over the sleeping bag at nite to protect from dew, rain and snow. tied in trees for shade. If you can think of a use for a P/T it was probably used for that atleast once!

Got away from extended pack trips and into hunting, alot of hunting. Setup basecamps and did day hikes. If rain or snow was possible carried rain suit in day pack but still kept P/T in there for emergency shelter.  Have'nt gone hunting for awhile (aprx. 4 yrs) been doing day trips and recently got back into packing. Once again the trusty P/T has found its way into my pack.

But now Im forced to look at my P/T and ask "what hav you done for me lately?"

Smaller lighter down bag fits into nicer pack w/rain cover

Prefer to use tent for protection against the elements.

Prefer rain suit over Poncho

The only thing Ive really used it for is as a footprint, which there are much smaller and lighter options for.

So beloved long time companion P/T......YOUR FIRED!

My only question is, what are my options for replacing it in my daypack as a basic emergency shelter. A Bivy?

I apolagize if Ive Hijacked yout thread R2

1:03 a.m. on May 14, 2011 (EDT)
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Apology not nessa, Robert ....

Your comments are EXACTLY what I wanted to hear.

Many of us have used one-or-more gear items for YEARS ... and, done well by them ... only to re-think them (as you have just done)  ... when a viable, and more practical / cost-effective ('cheaper') / feature-laden / better-technology replacement appears to take over the task(s) formerly accomplished by the older piece.

You are a wise person, Robert.   Thank you for your input.

r2

3:42 a.m. on May 14, 2011 (EDT)
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Yes basic, I keep one in my kit as I do not carry a designated rain jacket.  I have a Kelty model.

7:22 a.m. on May 14, 2011 (EDT)
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Callahan said:

Yes basic, I keep one in my kit as I do not carry a designated rain jacket.  I have a Kelty model.

 

Hmmm ....

I like Kelty stuff.   Have several items.   They stand the "test-of-time" rather well.

I shall see if they still offer a poncho.   If not hideously expensive, I might get one.

r2

7:33 a.m. on May 14, 2011 (EDT)
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I have one that I will sometimes throw in my pack during warm weather hikes. I've never used it, and only would if I needed a waterproof floor or roof during an emergency on a day hike.

8:32 a.m. on May 15, 2011 (EDT)
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azrhino said:

..My only question is, what are my options for replacing it (P/T) in my daypack as a basic emergency shelter. A Bivy?...

For day hike emergency shelter I carry one of those space blanket material bivies.  Used it once when a blizzard stranded me on the wrong side of the Continental Divide - "wore" it while hunkered down in a tree well - and it seemed to lessen my suffering somewhat.

Ed

8:55 a.m. on May 15, 2011 (EDT)
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I'm near several sail-makers (Annapolis, etc.).   I think I'll hit them-up, for any CUBEN scraps large-enough to make a poncho.

Seems like a good idea.

r2

11:52 p.m. on May 15, 2011 (EDT)
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Just looked at e new Gear review from N2DaWild

Adventure Medical KitsThermo-Lite 2.0 Bivvy. - I like the fact its reusable.

Looks like it might hav potential to make it in the pack. Gonna keep lookn at other options, Im really liking the Adventure Medical KitsHeatsheets Emergency Blanket option. Lot smaller and lighter

12:21 p.m. on May 16, 2011 (EDT)
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I agree with everything TheRambler said.

I used to carry a poncho but have switched over to a cagoule. This one: http://www.campmor.com/outdoor/gear/Product___77708

It's like a poncho with control. It kinda fits like your wearing a dress, going down to the knee. It doesn't breath as well as a poncho (but is fine IMO), but it doesn't flap around or any of the other problems with ponchos that TheRambler mentioned. The one I linked packs pretty small, has a rimed hood, elastic/velcro cuffs on the sleeves, a big front pocket, adjustable hem, velcro v neck for making it easy on/off/adjust. I always keep it in my pack. I've had mine for about 5 years, used it many times, it's still in great shape and won't use anything else for rain gear.

I even threw it on the other day when it started to rain on my BBQ.

7:19 p.m. on May 16, 2011 (EDT)
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Bkuti said:

..I used to carry a poncho but have switched over to a cagoule...

I think caguoules are the best utility upper shell wear.  I had one made out of Goretex, back in the 1980s when I was doing gonzo mountaineering projects.  Mine went to mid-shin.  It was the total bomber.  It had drawstrings at the hood opening, waist, and hem.  You could pull the hem up to snaps around your chest to shorten it to something approximating an anorak, or crouch down, drawing your knees up, and chinch the hem land hood drawstrings tight around your feet and face, converting it into a very effective emergency bivouac shelter.  Unfortunately someone else coveted this article, and it was stolen from me on a trip to Denali.  I never found a suitable replacement (I want something breathable, not plastic or coated).  Unfortunately no one seems to make them anymore, except from material such as the Campmor model you link to.  If I was still doing extreme trekking adventures, I would definitely have a seamstress fabricate me one, regardless it would probably cost $400, that is how highly I regard this piece of equipment. 

Ed

10:20 p.m. on May 16, 2011 (EDT)
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Bkuti said:

I agree with everything TheRambler said.

I used to carry a poncho but have switched over to a cagoule. This one: http://www.campmor.com/outdoor/gear/Product___77708

It's like a poncho with control. It kinda fits like your wearing a dress, going down to the knee. It doesn't breath as well as a poncho (but is fine IMO), but it doesn't flap around or any of the other problems with ponchos that TheRambler mentioned. The one I linked packs pretty small, has a rimed hood, elastic/velcro cuffs on the sleeves, a big front pocket, adjustable hem, velcro v neck for making it easy on/off/adjust. I always keep it in my pack. I've had mine for about 5 years, used it many times, it's still in great shape and won't use anything else for rain gear.

I even threw it on the other day when it started to rain on my BBQ.

 

Hmmm ....

Fascinating.  Might work for me.

I used to go to Campmor's frequently.   It's not far from Nu Yawk City, where I grew up.   (And why I 'tawk' funny ... and, the stories I could tell ... My Goodness!)   ...  I'd almost always stop by, when visiting relatives.   Sadly, most have passed.

I have 'tons' of stuff I've acquired from Campmor's.   There's an REI right-across from their parking-lot.   You can walk less than 50-meters, between the two stores.

Hoping to go there, soon.   Want to be sure and leave my credit-cards at home, though.   BTW -- they have a great on-premises repair shop.

r2

8:19 a.m. on May 17, 2011 (EDT)
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I have great fondness for a good poncho and have used some over the years as both raingear and a substitute for a tent. However, if I don't need the multi-use capability, I prefer a good mountain parka, anorak, or cagoule.

The old mountain parka (Sierra Designs made a nice one in 65/35, years ago) that was long enough to sit on is very difficult to find. I have instead an old Goretex anorak that fits the bill. Once you pull that over your head, you feel safe from the elements.

R2, here is a link to a cagoule that you might like -- http://www.prospectoroutfitters.com/istar.asp?a=6&id=SUND763!GRUND

or this -- http://www.prospectoroutfitters.com/istar.asp?a=6&id=WJ90!GRUND

or this -- http://www.prospectoroutfitters.com/istar.asp?a=6&id=70206!HH

or this -- http://www.empirecanvasworks.com/arcticanorak.htm

or this -- http://outsideonline.com/outside/gear/gear.tcl?gear=Arc-teryx-Alpha-SL-Pullover&gear_id=7377&action=showgear

Sorry, I had a bad case of GAS one day and searched for anoraks.

Regards,

Reed

5:22 p.m. on May 17, 2011 (EDT)
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Robert Rowe said:

Bkuti said:

I agree with everything TheRambler said.

I used to carry a poncho but have switched over to a cagoule. This one: http://www.campmor.com/outdoor/gear/Product___77708

It's like a poncho with control. It kinda fits like your wearing a dress, going down to the knee. It doesn't breath as well as a poncho (but is fine IMO), but it doesn't flap around or any of the other problems with ponchos that TheRambler mentioned. The one I linked packs pretty small, has a rimed hood, elastic/velcro cuffs on the sleeves, a big front pocket, adjustable hem, velcro v neck for making it easy on/off/adjust. I always keep it in my pack. I've had mine for about 5 years, used it many times, it's still in great shape and won't use anything else for rain gear.

I even threw it on the other day when it started to rain on my BBQ.

 

Hmmm ....

Fascinating.  Might work for me.

I used to go to Campmor's frequently.   It's not far from Nu Yawk City, where I grew up.   (And why I 'tawk' funny ... and, the stories I could tell ... My Goodness!)   ...  I'd almost always stop by, when visiting relatives.   Sadly, most have passed.

I have 'tons' of stuff I've acquired from Campmor's.   There's an REI right-across from their parking-lot.   You can walk less than 50-meters, between the two stores.

Hoping to go there, soon.   Want to be sure and leave my credit-cards at home, though.   BTW -- they have a great on-premises repair shop.

r2

 I live close enough to Campmor to go there a few times a month. I have used there repair shop a lot, the Greek woman that works during the day does amazing work, is fast and prices everything fairly. I to highly recommend. It's a EMS next door. Closest REI is about an hour from Campmor. But, there is also Ramsey Outdoors a few miles before Campmor and another one a few miles up in Ramsey. There's also two Sports Authorities and now a Dick's right next to Ramsey Outdoors in Paramus (I think Dick's was living up to their name opening up right there). Anyway, there's a bunch of outdoor stores on Rt. 17. 

If you make it to Campmor, check out the cagoule, the have them to try on. It's a great piece of gear to have.

LOL, when I go to California, I always get the "tawk" as well.

9:04 p.m. on May 17, 2011 (EDT)
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Bkuti said:

Robert Rowe said:

Bkuti said:

I agree with everything TheRambler said.

I used to carry a poncho but have switched over to a cagoule. This one: http://www.campmor.com/outdoor/gear/Product___77708

It's like a poncho with control. It kinda fits like your wearing a dress, going down to the knee. It doesn't breath as well as a poncho (but is fine IMO), but it doesn't flap around or any of the other problems with ponchos that TheRambler mentioned. The one I linked packs pretty small, has a rimed hood, elastic/velcro cuffs on the sleeves, a big front pocket, adjustable hem, velcro v neck for making it easy on/off/adjust. I always keep it in my pack. I've had mine for about 5 years, used it many times, it's still in great shape and won't use anything else for rain gear.

I even threw it on the other day when it started to rain on my BBQ.

 

Hmmm ....

Fascinating.  Might work for me.

I used to go to Campmor's frequently.   It's not far from Nu Yawk City, where I grew up.   (And why I 'tawk' funny ... and, the stories I could tell ... My Goodness!)   ...  I'd almost always stop by, when visiting relatives.   Sadly, most have passed.

I have 'tons' of stuff I've acquired from Campmor's.   There's an REI right-across from their parking-lot.   You can walk less than 50-meters, between the two stores.

Hoping to go there, soon.   Want to be sure and leave my credit-cards at home, though.   BTW -- they have a great on-premises repair shop.

r2

 I live close enough to Campmor to go there a few times a month. I have used there repair shop a lot, the Greek woman that works during the day does amazing work, is fast and prices everything fairly. I to highly recommend. It's a EMS next door. Closest REI is about an hour from Campmor. But, there is also Ramsey Outdoors a few miles before Campmor and another one a few miles up in Ramsey. There's also two Sports Authorities and now a Dick's right next to Ramsey Outdoors in Paramus (I think Dick's was living up to their name opening up right there). Anyway, there's a bunch of outdoor stores on Rt. 17. 

If you make it to Campmor, check out the cagoule, the have them to try on. It's a great piece of gear to have.

LOL, when I go to California, I always get the "tawk" as well.

 O0oops !

You're right.   I stand corrected.  It is an EMS store next to Campmor.

 It's been too long since I was there.   Every trip I have planned, in the past year-or-so ... got screwed-up (not my fault), and no time was left.  I like to take a couple hours, at least, to peruse the offerings.

BTW -- Route-17 on a Saturday morning is not for the meek.

Yogi Robt

11:31 p.m. on May 17, 2011 (EDT)
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whomeworry said:

Bkuti said:

..I used to carry a poncho but have switched over to a cagoule...

I think caguoules are the best utility upper shell wear.  I had one made out of Goretex, back in the 1980s when I was doing gonzo mountaineering projects.  Mine went to mid-shin.  It was the total bomber.  It had drawstrings at the hood opening, waist, and hem.  You could pull the hem up to snaps around your chest to shorten it to something approximating an anorak, or crouch down, drawing your knees up, and chinch the hem land hood drawstrings tight around your feet and face, converting it into a very effective emergency bivouac shelter.  Unfortunately someone else coveted this article, and it was stolen from me on a trip to Denali.  I never found a suitable replacement (I want something breathable, not plastic or coated).  Unfortunately no one seems to make them anymore, except from material such as the Campmor model you link to.  If I was still doing extreme trekking adventures, I would definitely have a seamstress fabricate me one, regardless it would probably cost $400, that is how highly I regard this piece of equipment. 

Ed

 ed

northwerks used to make a waterproof breathable cagoule. if i remember correctly they were made to your measurements. sadly i just googled them and the web page is no longer. anyone know the status of this company? i believe the owner's name is bob sherlock. there sure were a nice looking piece of gear. thought about getting one myself at one time.  

5:44 p.m. on May 18, 2011 (EDT)
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lazya4 said:

..northwerks used to make a waterproof breathable cagoule. if i remember correctly they were made to your measurements. sadly i just googled them and the web page is no longer...

That's a problem!  It is of little surprise no one in North America makes cagoules; they were mainly a European thing.  But not even the folks across the pond seem to have them any longer.  I have found a sew-it-yourself web site that sells a pattern, and also a outdoor gear seamstress who works from her own pattern, customizing it top your specs.  But alas no off the shelf product that is the basic unlined goretex wind shell.

Ed

7:45 a.m. on May 19, 2011 (EDT)
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Ed,

Here is the ultimate Gore-Tex cagoule ( a tad pricy, though) - http://www.raymears.com/Bushcraft_Product/534-Swazi-Ray-Mears-Tahr-Gore-Tex-Anorak/

Regards,

Reed

9:06 a.m. on May 19, 2011 (EDT)
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overmywaders said:

Here is the ultimate Gore-Tex cagoule ( a tad pricy, though) - http://www.raymears.com/Bushcraft_Product/534-Swazi-Ray-Mears-Tahr-Gore-Tex-Anorak/

 

YES -- A "tad" pricey.

I WANT ONE !!  ( *note-to-self:  inform G/F, for Christmas 'wish list' )

NoSmo King

11:21 a.m. on May 19, 2011 (EDT)
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overmywaders said:

Ed,

Here is the ultimate Gore-Tex cagoule ( a tad pricy, though) - http://www.raymears.com/Bushcraft_Product/534-Swazi-Ray-Mears-Tahr-Gore-Tex-Anorak/

Regards,

Reed

Actually the link is for an anorak; cagoules are longer, coming below the shin.  A cagoule come in handy as an emergency shelter, just squat and draw your legs up into the skirt of the garment, then draw the hem chinch around your ankles.  You can't do that with an anorak.

Ed

12:01 p.m. on May 19, 2011 (EDT)
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Bkuti said:

I used to carry a poncho but have switched over to a cagoule. This one: http://www.campmor.com/outdoor/gear/Product___77708

It's like a poncho with control. It kinda fits like your wearing a dress, going down to the knee. It doesn't breath as well as a poncho (but is fine IMO), but it doesn't flap around or any of the other problems with ponchos that TheRambler mentioned.

 Thanks for the link.  I used to use an old North Face Anorak in blue and your link reminds me of it:


77708_l.jpg
My anorak was used in the 1980's and looked just like the above.  Here's the thing:  It was a HOT MISERABLE PIECE OF GEAR.  Worse than a poncho.  Once cocooned in the thing, well, if you stand stock still you'll be fine, but as soon as you start hiking with your pack you'll melt.  It rolled up nice though and lashed to the pack in a good way, and it gave the illusion of rain protection when slapped over my head.  The zippered chest pocket also seemed like a good idea. 

I know, people will say they get hot and bothered in a goretex rain jacket too, but the anorak just has so much more heat retention and more fabric than you need. Give me a good Arcteryx goretex rain jacket with the pit zips and the Pro Shell and I'm good to go.  If it's a butt cold rain, I just wear the thing over a minimal baselayer and expect the baselayer to get wet with sweat.  If it's a heavy snow at 0F, I put it over my Icebreaker merino heavyweight tops and keep on hiking.  If it's a summer rain I don't need it and just stay in a wet t-shirt, donning if chilled.

2:02 p.m. on May 19, 2011 (EDT)
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Ed,

The terms "anorak" and "cagoule" have been used interchangeably in many contexts and have been altered over the past forty years. These days many Brits will call almost any hooded rainwear an anorak or kaggie, even if it has a full-length front zipper.

I could, and did, use my Black's of Greenock anorak as you suggest in the 1970's. Some anoraks had an extension that could drop down to cover to the knees.

Here is a better price from the makers in NZ of the anorak I like (but don't own):

http://www.swazi.co.nz/Online-Shop/Wet-Weather-Gear/Tahr-Anorak/

That has a generous back length measurement of approx. 36" in a large. My present anorak is only 32"; however, most modern rain jackets are like this SD - http://www.rei.com/product/772613/sierra-designs-hurricane-hp-rain-jacket-mens - which has only a 28" back length.

Regards,

Reed

5:51 p.m. on May 19, 2011 (EDT)
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I'd like a cuben fiber with a drawstring all around the bottom perimeter, but then again, I wouldn't be willing to pay $200-700 for it, either.

what's the lightest one anyone has found (that also functions well)?

11:58 p.m. on May 19, 2011 (EDT)
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overmywaders said:

Ed,

The terms "anorak" and "cagoule" have been used interchangeably in many contexts and have been altered over the past forty years. These days many Brits will call almost any hooded rainwear an anorak or kaggie, even if it has a full-length front zipper.

I could, and did, use my Black's of Greenock anorak as you suggest in the 1970's. Some anoraks had an extension that could drop down to cover to the knees.

Here is a better price from the makers in NZ of the anorak I like (but don't own):

http://www.swazi.co.nz/Online-Shop/Wet-Weather-Gear/Tahr-Anorak/

That has a generous back length measurement of approx. 36" in a large. My present anorak is only 32"; however, most modern rain jackets are like this SD - http://www.rei.com/product/772613/sierra-designs-hurricane-hp-rain-jacket-mens - which has only a 28" back length.

Regards,

Reed

 

Hello, Reed ~~

Thanks for the links.

That Swazi Company, from New Zealand ...  was looking through some of their other offerings:

  $1095  for a coat

    $409 for pants

    $175 for gaiters

      $30 for a pair of socks

Add to those prices, the cost of shipping from New Zealand.

What are those people putting in their Kook-Aid ?

I have three (3) pairs of Arc'teryx pants that cost me waaay less than that one pair of Swazi pants ... and, they are superb.

NoSmo King

6:54 p.m. on May 20, 2011 (EDT)
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RR,

Are those are NZ dollars? On the Swazi site you can do a conversion (eliminating GST as well) to US dollars.

I found that the Kiwis and Strines have some great outdoor gear. See http://www.stoneycreekshop.com.au/Rainwear-HydroTough-c-19.html for some Aussie pieces.

I can't afford $479USD for that anorak, or $405USD for the Swazi Narwhal ... wish I could.

However, because the US dollar is so low internationally, we suffer. But you can find a work-around (ahah!). The Ridgeline Monsoon Anorak is only $207USD when purchased from Britain, though made in NZ ( http://www.scottcountry.co.uk/products-ridgeline-monsoon-waterproof-coat-4019.htm ) Shipping is cheap from the UK, too.

Gotta love the Commonwealth!

Regards,

Reed

8:55 a.m. on May 21, 2011 (EDT)
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Yes -- You're right.   I failed to make the NZ / USA currency conversion calculation.

Still ... beyond my resources.   Nice stuff, though.   Very nice.

r2

9:02 a.m. on May 21, 2011 (EDT)
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overmywaders said:

..The terms "anorak" and "cagoule" have been used interchangeably in many contexts and have been altered over the past forty years...

This may be true, but such obfuscation doesn't facilitate my search for a garment that you can draw your entire body into by kneeling down.  In any case I have never seen a garment called an anorak that was as long as a trench coat; only cagoules (e.g. circa 1980s) had such tailoring.  Call it whatever you wish but they don't make such an article as a hardshell any more. 

Ed

9:15 a.m. on May 21, 2011 (EDT)
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Ed,

If that was obfuscation, it was not intentional.

Have you looked at the JakPak? http://jakpak.com/specs.aspx The JakPak is a jacket that may be used as a tent.

What about the Hilleberg Bivanorak - an anorak (you might also call it a cagoule) that becomes a bivy bag?  See http://www.hilleberg.com/home/products/bivanorak/bivanorak.php


JPEG10RGB-BivanorakRed-cv-08-1269-NoRGBt
Call that an anorak, as Hilleberg does, or cagoule, as you wish - it is a hardshell and provides the length > a trench coat.

Regards,

Reed

9:36 a.m. on May 21, 2011 (EDT)
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2,295 forum posts

overmywaders said:

Ed,

If that was obfuscation, it was not intentional.

Have you looked at the JakPak?...

..What about the Hilleberg Bivanorak...

No problem.  I just pine and lament.

The JakPak is too much like one of those deluxe Swiss army knives, in that to be all things it makes trade offs I am not willing to deal with.  The Bivianorak is impractical for my intended use: the hem is too long, and in any case the fabric is UV coated, not a breathable garment.  But thanks for the help:)

Ed

10:24 a.m. on May 21, 2011 (EDT)
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581 forum posts

Ed,

There is one you might like. It is Gore-tex and made way oversize. Though the bottom is intended to cover a kayak's spray skirt, or serve as a temp spray skirt, it also can be cinched up inside while hiking. It is certainly long enough to cover your feet when seated with knees tucked up.


SAL.jpg
This is the Kokatat Gore-tex Storm Cag.

Reed

11:38 a.m. on May 21, 2011 (EDT)
102 reviewer rep
2,295 forum posts

overmywaders said:

Ed,

There is one you might like...
..the Kokatat Gore-tex Storm Cag...

Close, but at the price quoted by their distributors I can get my gear seamstress to make one to my exact specs. 

Ed

September 30, 2014
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