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Heavy stuff....

9:06 a.m. on June 6, 2011 (EDT)
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We hear it all the time "lighten up!". But there is gear that for one reason or another, you just cant do without. Maybe it is a heavy meal, something passed down from your dad, or just for comfort. Extra weight that you carry just for the joy of having it with you.

Lets hear it folks. What do you carry that makes you the anti-ultalight packpacker!

10:04 a.m. on June 6, 2011 (EDT)
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Thermos of hot coffee in the winter and snow.

Ten pounds of fat I need to loose. 

Gun, sometimes, bow during archery season.

Tent; most of the time its un-needed.

 

 

12:33 p.m. on June 6, 2011 (EDT)
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moccasins. they feel great after a day of hiking. I've tried other camp footwear, and I always wish I had my moccasins.

wool sweaters. a heavyweight for winter, and a cashmere turtleneck for spring and fall. I've tried fleece, and I always wish I had my wool. when I'm dressed head to toe in plastics, it feels strange to be out in nature.

and at this point, I reckon most people would also point at my choice in backpacks. I like 90's technology, design, and craftsmanship.

4:44 p.m. on June 6, 2011 (EDT)
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hahaha finally a topic for the people who like to carry a little more! Kudos mikemorrow. I guess I'm just a glutton for punishment or a creature of comfort but I'm not an ounce counter. Of the 'silly things' I carry into the backcountry- my sleeping pad weighs 3 1/2 lbs, it would be easy to shave that weight but I can't put a price on a restfull night. My knife is heavy and large, my uncle is a retired knife maker and he gave me one of the first knives he made from the 60's and I'm honoured to carry it. Lastly, food- not a huge fan of the freeze dried stuff so I generally carry fresh food in. I know this would be considered blasphemy in the UL community but to each his own right?

4:55 p.m. on June 6, 2011 (EDT)
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I just started carrying a guitar and won't be without it now.

It's a half size and only 2.5 lbs so not really "heavy".

See Trip Report:

http://www.trailspace.com/forums/trip-reports/topics/91524.html

 

I also carry fresh fruit and vegtables which are heavy. Apples, oranges, veggie salads (carrots, squash, peppers, broccoli, etc...)

5:17 p.m. on June 6, 2011 (EDT)
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large backpack - nearly eight pounds, not including the 40-60 i usually carry on longer hikes or winter trips. 

favorite hiking boots - four and a quarter pounds

mountaineering boots - over five and a half pounds

winter sleeping bag - over five pounds (a -40 fahrenheit down bag)

i need a new winter tent, but the one i want weighs over eleven pounds. 

* * *

i defend most of this for winter hiking in the Northeast.  i wouldn't risk my life on lighter gear that i don't think is as warm or as capable of carrying the weight or withstanding abuse and bad weather.  but, i do use the hiking boots and pack in the summer sometimes, too.  yes, i am the human equivalent of a mule - too stubborn to change, but very capable of carrying the weight. 

on the other hand, i am not a one trick pony.  the trail runners i use for day-hiking weigh two pounds for the pair, and my lightest pack, usable for day hikes or ultralight overnights, weighs nine ounces.   

6:13 p.m. on June 6, 2011 (EDT)
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Mules Unite!

 

6:18 p.m. on June 6, 2011 (EDT)
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I carry many things for comfort and pleasure. First would be my chair. Its 8x6x8 inches and weighs a Lb.  It folds down flat. I have found that I stay cleaner not sitting on the ground. I to take in fresh friut, hate power bars. Might try veggies too. Nothing better than good food on the trail. For dinner I will carry some Veetee curry dishes. Each meal can weigh 10-12 ozs. The nice thing about loading up on good foods is that you lose that weight off your back every meal. At the end of your trip you are pounds lighter. I like sleeping in tents. And sometimes I will carry a tarp too.

6:36 p.m. on June 6, 2011 (EDT)
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Leather boots - 4lbs 6oz

MH tent - 8lbs 2 oz

MSR Classic Alpine cookset - 1lb 10oz

Camping Gaz lantern - 247gms + canister

6:44 p.m. on June 6, 2011 (EDT)
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If you start comparing everything in my pack to the trend of the day and UL backpacking, everything I have is "heavy".  I don't think anything I carry is other than heavy based against ULism.  Stove, pot, sleeping bag...EVERYTHING.

8:25 p.m. on June 6, 2011 (EDT)
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leadbelly2550 said:

large backpack - nearly eight pounds, not including the 40-60 i usually carry on longer hikes or winter trips. 

favorite hiking boots - four and a quarter pounds

mountaineering boots - over five and a half pounds

winter sleeping bag - over five pounds (a -40 fahrenheit down bag)

i need a new winter tent, but the one i want weighs over eleven pounds. 

* * *

i defend most of this for winter hiking in the Northeast.  i wouldn't risk my life on lighter gear that i don't think is as warm or as capable of carrying the weight or withstanding abuse and bad weather.  but, i do use the hiking boots and pack in the summer sometimes, too.  yes, i am the human equivalent of a mule - too stubborn to change, but very capable of carrying the weight. 

on the other hand, i am not a one trick pony.  the trail runners i use for day-hiking weigh two pounds for the pair, and my lightest pack, usable for day hikes or ultralight overnights, weighs nine ounces.   

 

What winter tent suitable for a single hiker weighs over eleven lbs. ? I have several tents, all of which are capable of functioning in the conditions found here in western and northern Canada and I have done a LOT of solo winter camping including some long stints of several weeks living in one of my tents. My heaviest is my Hilleberg Saivo, and I use this only for a basecamp and do not backpack it, most of mine weigh less than  5 lbs.

I also have camped, alone at a measured -41*F and on the toe of some of BC's glaciers and my sleeping bag(s) for this use weigh under 4.5 lbs. I have carried my share of heavy packs and am still, at 65, capable of packing a fair load, but, I do try to watch the weight of each gear item so that my overall pack weight is not excessive.

I think that you may be able to find gear that is both lighter and also fully functional at extreme temps. However, each to his own.

12:35 p.m. on June 7, 2011 (EDT)
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Kelty pack in winter 5lbs

leathermen

mountain hardwear tent 6lbs

folding saw for firewood

Gortex boots 2 lbs

gortex Jacket 2lbs

this is all winter and theirs more..Just cant think off the top of my head.LOL

4:35 p.m. on June 7, 2011 (EDT)
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Everything I own is big and heavy as I'm usually 5-10 years behind the curve due to the fact that I only buy used.  In 5-10 years when I buy all the stuff that's avaliable now it will be considered big and heavy, if there is any place left to backpack that is.  But in the end that is one of the reasons they make massive backpacks is it not?

So, maybe I should get a job so I can buy new stuff?,  humm........... naw ;-}>

11:37 p.m. on June 7, 2011 (EDT)
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I saw a guy last year in the Tetons carrying a 10 inch cast iron frying pan!

Me?  I never leave home without a camera, most often a DSLR.

7:36 a.m. on June 8, 2011 (EDT)
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ULers can go light because they generally do short "snippet" trips or long trips with frequent resupply.  When Skurka walked around Alaska even he carried between 50 to 60 lbs on portions not accessible to resupply, and he carried over 2 lbs of food per day on average for the whole 4,700 mile journey.

All the gear I carry is about as light as it can be for the job it does.  My pack is 7.7 lbs but this bulk must be used to hump in up to three weeks of food at a time.  If ULers had to carry 40 lbs of just food, well, they would not be ULers anymore.  And try to get 60+ lbs into a Granite Gear Vapor Trail or a Gossamer Gear Maiposa or Gorilla or into the Osprey Exos or the Golite Quest and you'll end up where we've all been:  Trying to use a small pack to haul a big load---it doesn't really work.

And I always carry some kind of stout and roomy four season tent thruout the year.  It usually weighs somewhere around 7 lbs, so my pack/tent combo comes to 15 lbs right off the bat.  Then you throw in the four or five books and the white gas fuel and the little radio with extra batteries and the camera, and add to the heap all the necessary additional gear for the winter and well, the pack gets up there.

But all backpackers try to get the best gear they can find, and the best is usually the lightest, as with Western Mountaineering bags and some of the fast and light Thermarests.  I use a Prolite Plus large pad for most of the year and it is very light and very comfy when compared to other old-time beefy Thermarests like the Base Camp or Camp Rest.

9:32 a.m. on June 8, 2011 (EDT)
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Cant say I am anti UL hiker but I will say I have a few types of gear I would not give up just to shave a few grams off my weight.I love a tooth brush with a complete handle.I prefer free standing double wall tents over coated silnylon UL tents.I prefer a hikeing boot a bit more roboust than a tennis shoe etc etc.Not to say I haven't worked a putting less weight on my back but there are only so many ways I will shave corners.

11:18 a.m. on June 8, 2011 (EDT)
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I am slowly working at lowering my fully packed weight, but I tend toward the mid to heavyish range. I was definitely more in the mule category when I first got into backpacking. As I go along I will lighten my kit when I able to afford high qaulity lighter gear. I am sure what I take will fluctuate and become more refined as well. 

My heavier gear items would be:

  • Two man tent- 5lbs
  • Full size sleeping pad
  • Synthetic sleeping bag.
  • Fixed blade full tang knife (I actaully use my knife, and can't stand using a cricket sized knife for much of anything)
  • Technical WPB shell.
  • Full size cookset with multiple pots, fry pan, utensils, spices, olive oil, two pot handlers, metal mug, etc. (I like to cook real meals while backpacking)
  •  Fresh Food- meats, eggs, vegies, fruit, cheese, bread, etc.
  • Two 27 oz Stainless water bottles. I don't like plastic, and like being able to boil water in my bottle. I plan to get one large-mouthed Kleen Kanteen and a platapus to shave some weight, though.
  • Fully equiped emergency and first aid kit. What can I say, I'm a bit of a boy scout.
  • Camera.
  • Water Filter. I do not like drops and tablets.

The full weight, with water included as well as food for a 3-5 day trip under my "heavy" setup is 40lbs give or take a few. So that means my base weight would be about 28-32 lbs

When I am going solo in 3 seasons and want to shave things down I can get much lighter:  bivy instead of the tent; 1 Person titanium cookset;  plastic water bottles; freeze dried meals; Use phone's camera; etc. Those changes would get me down to about 28-32lbs total.

 

 

 

2:00 p.m. on June 8, 2011 (EDT)
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First meal, steak.

3:08 p.m. on June 8, 2011 (EDT)
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My Big Agnes Insulated Air Core Pad, I love that thing. I have thought about going lighter but I really like a good nights rest and that thing is warm and comfy!

4:14 p.m. on June 8, 2011 (EDT)
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@trouthunter

What is the MH tent?  Mega-Heavy?

6:51 p.m. on June 8, 2011 (EDT)
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ocalacomputerguy said:

@trouthunter

What is the MH tent?  Mega-Heavy?

 Haha - It's a Mountain Hardware Skyview 2+

Double wall 3-4 season convertible with zip out panels

Two doors, five poles, internal guy system, gear loft.

45 sq. ft. plus 17 sq. ft. vestibule.

Urethane roll over coat on the rainfly & bathtub floor.

So....yeah it's Mega Heavy I guess!


SDC10099.jpg

9:29 p.m. on June 8, 2011 (EDT)
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Most of my extras are food related:

  • 750ML whiskey on week long trips.  Sometimes augmented with wine and beer.  I make my companions share the load when beer and wine are along.
  • First meal steak and potato, when wood fires permitted; otherwise something phoo phoo like sautéed scallops, both with fresh veggies.
  • A dried salami, gourmet cheese and crackers for snacking the first couple of days.
  • ¼ to ½ pound of butter and olive oil, depending on how many in my group.
  • Small (one cup) espresso machine.
  • Condensed milk: 1 small can per day for oatmeal and coffee.
  • Pare cooked bacon: one serving every other day. Not much weight but heavy relative to freeze dried stuff.
  • Fancy chocolate bar every night.
  • 3-5 gallons of water on dry camp trips.
  • Other goodies on a case by case basis.

Basic gear:

  • 100’ ¼” nylon rope, and 100” lightweight cord.
  • 8’X8’ plastic tarp to serve as a rain fly, in addition to tent and tent foot print. (when venturing to areas with daily rain).
  • Day pack
  • Three changes of socks and underwear, including those currently wearing.
  • I always bring a sleeping bag rated 20° cooler than expected temps – I like to sleep under the stars in comfort.
  • Books - average about two pounds

Winter items, beyond basic warmer gear:

  • Lightweight climbing rope, harness, climbing hardware, ice axe, crampons, snow shovel, etc for steep slope ascents.  (Leave the steak and espresso machine at home!)  Some of this gear is shared.
  • Light weight tele ski gear.
  • Extra fuel to heat water used for personal hygiene.
  • Smoke flares

-------------

It’s brutal on the trail, but heaven at camp.  My wife says I am a Jackass, so I guess I have the back to haul all of this stuff.  That’s my take on her comment, anyway.

Ed

3:54 a.m. on June 9, 2011 (EDT)
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Sorta going along with this thread... lately I've been doing day hikes with a 60 pound sandbag in one of my packs ^_^

its amazing feeling the difference in my leg as I push myself further and further... and knowing its making me a touch healthier

I've never minded taking extra weight for luxury items.  Last backpacking trip I took a bottle of wine (in a plastic container) along with a full size pillow (stuffed down though)

8:02 p.m. on June 9, 2011 (EDT)
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For 22 years I traveled light and froze at night; I don't like to be wet; I don't like to be cold; and I do not wait in line for food.  So, I carry whatever will make me happy.  For me it is my UL pillow (only 3oz) or it might be fresh food.  If you want to carry an 11 pound tent, go for it if that enhances your outdoor experience.  I had a friend who carried a cast iron dutch oven; I mocked him until I ate the meals he cooked.  I have done long trips with resupply and without, and I have slept in puddles, but the difference now is that it is my choice.  When I don't wanna I don't, and when I do wanna I do.

11:39 a.m. on June 10, 2011 (EDT)
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Now Ed, I would hope you are joking with some of the items (not the liquor though), but knowing you, you are probably telling the truth. Haha.

 

I also have carried a fifth of whiskey or a 750 of a wine to go with my cheese/sausage and crackers...

12:07 p.m. on June 10, 2011 (EDT)
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travelnate said:

... lately I've been doing day hikes with a 60 pound sandbag in one of my packs ^_^

its amazing feeling the difference in my leg as I push myself further and further... and knowing its making me a touch healthier

 

Right on, Lad !

Many of you have seen a few of my posts, touting the benefits of being fit ... and, even, as travelnate, here ... actually engaging in a program of training for fitness, related to backpacking.

I scoff at the 'pencil-neck, UL-obsessed geeks and no-neck fatties', that are hideously out-of-shape ... trying to huff-&-puff up a moderate incline with their 'hi-tech' UL gear.  ( * insert "roll-the-eyes" smilie * ).

I'm just anxious for the inevitable "Darwin Awards" to be announced.

____________________________________

    ~r2~

12:24 p.m. on June 10, 2011 (EDT)
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UPDATE

I suggest all here to investigate a book I just acquired, and am v impressed with the content:

"The LIFE PLAN" --  by Jeffry S. Life, M.D., Ph.D.

Also, the Cenegenics Medical Institute.


You may have seen pics of the author, Jeffry S. Life, a verrrry 'ripped' 73-yr old.

_____________________________________

     ~r2~

5:18 p.m. on June 10, 2011 (EDT)
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@whomeworry

Is the condensed mild the sweetened condensed or evaporated? How well does it compare to milk?  I've thought about the evaporated kind for tea just never got around to trying it.

Second. How do you pare cook the bacon and how do you store it?

Thanks

 

11:00 p.m. on June 10, 2011 (EDT)
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@ocalacomputerguy

I think ed is talking about Shelf stable bacon you can buy at the supermarket. It's actually pare cooked.Oscar myer has it and other brands. I would like the answer as well to the evaporated milk . Then I can make some Thai tea while on the trail..

8:55 a.m. on June 13, 2011 (EDT)
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D&G in the Smokys said:

Now Ed, I would hope you are joking ...

Actually I do carry this stuff, albeit not all at the same time.  My weekend pack is often as heavy as my through hike kit, both typically ranging from 45 - 70 pounds.  Speaking of which, I forgot to mention the occasional cooler stocked with steaks and lobster on dry ice for multi-day trips!  I guess after shouldering HUGE expedition loads at high altitude my back is too numb to notice anymore.  My pack weight nowadays is limited by how much I can hoist with my arms and safely sling on my back (approx 90 pounds), though I rarely ever go that heavy anymore.  As my bio states: my pack ..looks heavy enough to include every comfort conceivable. And it does.

ocalacomputerguy said:

@whomeworry

Is the condensed mild the sweetened condensed or evaporated? How well does it compare to milk?...

Second. How do you pare cook the bacon and how do you store it? 

 Sweetened, condensed.  The taste is stronger than milk, sweeter too, but I prefer it over powdered milk.  As I said, goes well with coffee and oat meal.

The bacon is precooked, available at the grocery store.  It stores at room temperature; can be eatten out of the box or fried like trad bacon.  Not as good as Campin' Bacon, however (does anyone remember that product, it was the bomb!)

Ed

1:21 p.m. on June 13, 2011 (EDT)
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With the exception of about 5-8 extra pounds right on my stomach I am a rather bony person. Since a comfortable sleeping pad is usually one of the heavier things one carries in their pack I thought this thread might be a good place to ask...

Is there a lot of difference in the comfort level between 1.5 and 2.0  inch thick self-inflating pads?

2:35 p.m. on June 13, 2011 (EDT)
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ocalacomputerguy said:

Is there a lot of difference in the comfort level between 1.5 and 2.0  inch thick self-inflating pads?

 The difference half an inche makes is huge. My first inflatable sleeping pad was a thermarest prolite 3 (1in.), a couple years later I picked up a Prolite 4 (1.5in), and I could hardly believe the difference. That little 1/2 inch make sleeping far more comfortable. With the 1in. mattress, in I would frequently be able to feel the ground on pressure points, which is not the case with the slightly thicker mat

2:42 p.m. on June 13, 2011 (EDT)
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gonzan said:


  • Full size cookset with multiple pots, fry pan, utensils, spices, olive oil, two pot handlers, metal mug, etc. (I like to cook real meals while backpacking)
  •  Fresh Food- meats, eggs, vegies, fruit, cheese, bread, etc.

I can attest to this.  Watching gonzan fix breakfast or lunch or supper or dinner or brunch or whatever is an interesting sight.

2:45 p.m. on June 13, 2011 (EDT)
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gonzan said:

ocalacomputerguy said:

Is there a lot of difference in the comfort level between 1.5 and 2.0  inch thick self-inflating pads?

 The difference half and inche makes is huge. My first inflatable sleeping pad was a thermarest prolite 3 (1in.), a couple years later I picked up a Prolite 4 (1.5in), and I could hardly believe the difference. That little 1/2 inch make sleeping far more comfortable. With the 1in. mattress, in I would prequently be able to feel the ground on pressure points, which is not the case with the slightly thicker mat

 Thermarest used to make a very light pad called, duh, the Ultralight---I have one somewhere---and it was 20 inches wide and one inch thick.  Uncomfortable.  The Prolites and Prolite Plus evolved from this pad and there's really no comparision.  My Plus large is outstanding for three season use and needs no special care except for adequate protection while hiking. (Wrapped in my ground cloth and stuck inside its stuff sac).

2:51 p.m. on June 13, 2011 (EDT)
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Tipi Walter said:

gonzan said:

  • Full size cookset with multiple pots, fry pan, utensils, spices, olive oil, two pot handlers, metal mug, etc. (I like to cook real meals while backpacking)
  •  Fresh Food- meats, eggs, vegies, fruit, cheese, bread, etc.

I can attest to this.  Watching gonzan fix breakfast or lunch or supper or dinner or brunch or whatever is an interesting sight.

 I think I am being mocked!  Funny, considering my pack weighs about 20 lbs less..

;)

(j/k of course)

2:57 p.m. on June 13, 2011 (EDT)
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Tipi Walter said:

 My Plus large is outstanding for three season use and needs no special care except for adequate protection while hiking. (Wrapped in my ground cloth and stuck inside its stuff sac).

 I often just fold my deflated mattress into a flat configuration about a foot wide, and place that vertically in the pack against my back. It stays well protected there.

I lent my old prolite3 to a friend, who then hiked with it inflated and strapped to the outside of his pack! O.o I have no idea...  Needless to say, it came back with a couple pin holes from briars.

4:03 p.m. on June 13, 2011 (EDT)
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I take boots and trail runners/hiking shoes. I sometimes bring my water shoes when there are streams/rivers to wade in. So, I add weight with extra foot gear. I do like to pamper my feet.

4:32 p.m. on June 13, 2011 (EDT)
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Thanks guys. I'll be buying either the ALPS Mountaineering Lightweight Series Air Pad or the Comfort Series at 2 inches thick. They've been rolling through on Steep and cheap at prices I can afford.

5:06 p.m. on June 13, 2011 (EDT)
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I think if Gonzan and Ed ever collided into each other on the trail you'd have the world's first completely outdoor gourmet restaurant.

BTW Gonzan your idea of a

Full size cookset with multiple pots, fry pan, utensils, spices, olive oil, two pot handlers, metal mug, etc.

must be a lot smaller than mine 'cause I couldn't fit all of that plus the rest of your gear into a 75 liter/4500 cu in. pack.


6:16 p.m. on June 13, 2011 (EDT)
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I make a mean Jumbalaya and Curry dishes. Dont carry the old cast iron anymore. Otherwise I would do a pineapple upsidedown cake for ya. :)

8:10 p.m. on June 13, 2011 (EDT)
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gonzan said:

Tipi Walter said:

gonzan said:

  • Full size cookset with multiple pots, fry pan, utensils, spices, olive oil, two pot handlers, metal mug, etc. (I like to cook real meals while backpacking)
  •  Fresh Food- meats, eggs, vegies, fruit, cheese, bread, etc.

I can attest to this.  Watching gonzan fix breakfast or lunch or supper or dinner or brunch or whatever is an interesting sight.

 I think I am being mocked!  Funny, considering my pack weighs about 20 lbs less..

;)

(j/k of course)

 Haha,

Some people love to cook and eat well on hiking or backpacking trips, I'm one of them.

I can be very spartan if I want to move fast and light sometimes carrying only boil and eat meals, or meals ready to eat.

Most times I plan my meals out and enjoy preparing them, for me cooking is part of a fun and memorable trip.

6:27 p.m. on June 14, 2011 (EDT)
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ocalacomputerguy said:

Is there a lot of difference in the comfort level between 1.5 and 2.0  inch thick self-inflating pads?

I selected my inflatable foam pad picking one thick enough that my hips didn’t bottom out.  It was a good performance spec, as I have been totally comfortable.  Try before you buy.

Ed

7:22 p.m. on June 14, 2011 (EDT)
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Ed

What brand and size?

8:01 p.m. on June 14, 2011 (EDT)
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Just a personal quirk but I hate to roll off the side, have feet off the pad, so I would definetly test out whatever model you choose! As I said in the 'heavy post' thread my pad is 3.7 lbs. Heavy? Yes. Terrible to pack? Yes. But for me its all worth it the next morning. I'd be the first to tell you I'm no good when I havn't slept, hahaha. Good luck with whatever you choose to go with!

8:52 p.m. on June 14, 2011 (EDT)
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My heavies:

Pivetta Article 8 boots: 5lbs

Arcteryx Bora 95 backpack: 9lbs

Hilleberg Allak tent (w/footprint): 8lbs

Thermarest Prolite Plus sleeping pad, size large: 2lbs

My shorter-millage trips sure are comfortable though!

11:32 a.m. on June 15, 2011 (EDT)
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Yeepers, and I thought my 75 liter was a beast at 6lbs!

1:25 p.m. on June 15, 2011 (EDT)
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ocalacomputerguy said:

Ed

What brand and size?

 Thermarest - I don't recall the model, but it is orange, very light, and though a full size mat, it fits into a 5X10" stuff bag.

Ed

1:36 p.m. on June 15, 2011 (EDT)
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whomeworry said:

ocalacomputerguy said:

Ed

What brand and size?

 Thermarest - I don't recall the model, but it is orange, very light, and though a full size mat, it fits into a 5X10" stuff bag.

Ed

I am pretty sure the only orange coloured matts that Thermarest made were the Prolite 3 & 4, which have now been replaced with the Prolite and Prolite Plus, which are Red.

1:41 p.m. on June 15, 2011 (EDT)
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I haven't read through this entire thread but want to add my 2 cents.

I did the UL thing for a bit but wasn't happy. I like using a 2 man tent (of a design that I like, not to worried about weight). Same with my pack. I like bringing extras: reading material, lanterns (UCO Candle) booze, pipe, etc. And I like to eat well. And feel no need to spend a ridiculous amount of money for a sleeping bag - for what I do. My summer bag is a $40 Slumberjack and winter is a $100 Kelty. I'm very happy with both and they do the job.

I carried all this stuff years ago before the UL thing got out of hand (and expensive) and did it without complaint. Everyone did it years ago one way or the other. Would all the UL freaks be backpacking if it wasn't for stuff being so light? Or would they have no choice to man up for what they like to do (backpacking)? I guess that will never be known. But whatever floats your boat and gets you out there.

2:24 p.m. on June 15, 2011 (EDT)
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I read one of John Muir's journals recently. He talked about heading off into the woods with some loose tea in one pocket and a few heels of bread in the other. Of course this, with his sierra cup, broad brimmed hat and jacket seemed to keep him comfortable while he became absorbed with his surroundings. He would make a little stick fire, boil water in his cup and drop some tea into it, while he settled under the boughs of an overhanging fir to eat his bread and sleep.

I am not sure how close this discription came to how he actually traveled but to me it feels like he was in survival mode. Yet he writes as though it was the height of comfort. Possibly a more romantic view then a realistic one?

2:46 p.m. on June 15, 2011 (EDT)
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Yup, sounds like type 2 fun...

11:06 p.m. on June 15, 2011 (EDT)
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I imagine he probably was comfortable if it wasn't winter.  It sounded like he just went off for an afternoon hike, had a cup of tea, some bread and took a nap.  Remember it was probably in the mid to late 1800's (he lived from 1838 to 1914) and a lot of what we take for granted like central heat and Air, refrigerators, electric lights (well near the end of his life for lights) cars (model T 1908-1927. No such thing as nylon, polyester, Gor-Tex, synthetic fill for sleeping bags.  So he probably was fairly comfortable.

Wonder what he would think of my equipment?  My guesses...

Alps Mountaineering Cascade 5200.  "Bit brightly colored for a ruck sack.  I like the cloth, bit thinner than canvas but feels durable. What are these metal rods and stiff material for? "

Jetboil PCS. "You boil water with this? 3 minutes? What are you in such a hurry for? What happens when you run out of fuel? The cup is nice but I'll stick with wood. "

Alps Mountaineering Zephyr 3. "That's a tent? You mean to tell me there's a in that little bag? It's awfully small and light. You sure it won't blow away in a breeze? No way this thin material will last and those poles will snap in a decent wind. Who needs a tent anyway? Give me a piece of canvas and a stick for a good lean to."

Camelbak Fourteener.  "That things made out of such thin material wouldn't last a year before it wore through. Not enough room for more than a day. What do you mean that's the idea? You put water in there and suck it out the tube. Whatever happened to a good ole' canteen? Last a lot longer than that flimsy thing."

Alps Crescent 20 degree (don't have it yet). "Material's thin but I guess won't get that much wear. I've heard about these things. Doesn't seem thick enough for 20 degrees. What do you mean it still works wet? "

11:52 p.m. on June 15, 2011 (EDT)
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gonzan said:

..I am pretty sure the only orange coloured matts that Thermarest made were the ...

 Now that you have jogged my memory, Prolite it is.

Ed

11:57 p.m. on June 15, 2011 (EDT)
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I have always carried a rather heavy backpack.  I did mostly winter camping in the Sierra Nevada mountain range.  My oldest son started withsnow camping in February of 1987 at age twelve.  Whereas my youngest son was nine years old in June of 1991 when he first went backpacking and March of 1992 when he first went snow camping.
I made sure my sons were not overloaded by limiting them to a maximum pack-load of 20% of their body weight.  Anything that exceeded that load was carried by the family 'pack-mule'.... aka Dad!
My heaviest snow camping load was 52-lbs when I took extra gear just in case my son lost his skull cap, gloves, plus stove fuel, water, etc.  This all along with my TNF VE-24 tent brought my total pack weight up to52-lbs.  This was for a three night trip.
My pack is lighter now, because I don't carry extra gear nor thetent anymore.  My sons and son in-law carry their entire load.  
I designed and sewed the three backpacks for myself and my two sons! Our packs are heavier than some of the commercial internal frame backpacks but, they fit our needs.
I could probably trim some weight off my pack weight but, I like some of my creature comforts, such as down booties.
I will say, I sink deeper in snow when I fall on my skis with a heavy pack on!

12:12 a.m. on June 16, 2011 (EDT)
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Hafford said:

I read one of John Muir's journals recently. He talked about heading off into the woods with some loose tea in one pocket and a few heels of bread in the other...

Fact and fiction blur when it comes to the ledgendaries.  What the text didn't mention is he had three days of provisions under his finger nails...

Muir frequently rode on horse back and often brought along substantially more kit including a full size axe, and a fur coat that weighed ten pounds by itself.  I also recall seeing pics of him with a rifle.  Leave no trace was not as refined back then, and the environmentalist was a somewhat different creature than its current rendition.  But I should not say much more, I haven't schooled up much on the man

Ed

9:16 a.m. on July 22, 2011 (EDT)
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I admit to backpacking:

Alite Designs Monarch Butterfly Chair (not an ensolite pad)

Exped DownMat 7 Short (not a NeoAir)

Outdoor Research Bug Bivy (not a tarp)

Canon PowerShot SX100 digital camera (not a mini cam)

I am looking for a "trail-friendly radio" for my amateur radio hobby:

Meanwhile, I pack a Yaesu FT-817ND.

I will have to "do better".

I have a website about ultralight and lightweight backpacking. Hah!

9:36 a.m. on July 22, 2011 (EDT)
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ConnieD said:

I admit to backpacking:

Alite Designs Monarch Butterfly Chair (not an ensolite pad)

Exped DownMat 7 Short (not a NeoAir)

Outdoor Research Bug Bivy (not a tarp)

Canon PowerShot SX100 digital camera (not a mini cam)

I am looking for a "trail-friendly radio" for my amateur radio hobby:

Meanwhile, I pack a Yaesu FT-817ND.

I will have to "do better".

I have a website about ultralight and lightweight backpacking. Hah!

 Connie D Welcome to trailspace!!! Have you heard of Dennis "K1" Blanchard? he carried one on his AT thru hike. He post's at times on WB. You might ask what type of unit he used he's an amatuer ham operator as well. You may beable to reconfigure a handset body. But it's been along time since I touched radio's. LOL But Welcome look forward to you adding to the community.

11:30 a.m. on July 22, 2011 (EDT)
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Welcome Connie

I googled the Alite Designs Monarch Butterfly Chair to see what it was. Neat chair.  I've seen some similar in design. Underneath Alite Designs listing was the Sexy Hotness Sleeping Bag. Of course I had to look.


02-01a-pur_04_1.jpg

http://www.alitedesigns.com/sexy-hotness-sleeping-bag-4

I'm thinking everybody in that video owns a snuggie. Alite needs to make it in camo cause they're missing the Redneck gift market.

12:05 p.m. on July 22, 2011 (EDT)
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Snuggie!

I don't think I will have the newest Elecraft KX3 anytime soon.

Here is the "trail friendly radio" for me: http://kd1jv.qrpradio.com/

The problem is, he announces the latest and they are all sold out.

Thank you, for the nice welcome.

6:02 p.m. on July 22, 2011 (EDT)
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ocalacomputerguy said:

Welcome Connie

I googled the Alite Designs Monarch Butterfly Chair to see what it was. Neat chair.  I've seen some similar in design. Underneath Alite Designs listing was the Sexy Hotness Sleeping Bag. Of course I had to look.


02-01a-pur_04_1.jpg

http://www.alitedesigns.com/sexy-hotness-sleeping-bag-4

I'm thinking everybody in that video owns a snuggie. Alite needs to make it in camo cause they're missing the Redneck gift market.

 I am completely at a loss for words here... Which may be a good thing.

6:30 a.m. on July 23, 2011 (EDT)
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Me, too.  (Probably one of the few times).

                                            ~r2~

8:14 a.m. on July 23, 2011 (EDT)
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While a wearable sleeping bag is not entirely an unwelcome idea, the ad itself is too strange: dog-on-a-stick?

I had to look, and then, the words and images were at least "PG" if not "R".

I wish my inner-parent had guided me... that is one strange ad.

I remember someone else has made a brightly colored wearable sleeping bag.

If the ad were improved, and, the product not pink, the price is an inexpensive Akula Raku "knock-off".

Feathered Friends makes a down suit, also Mountain Hardwear, Marmot, Eddie Bauer, Bask Canada, and there is the Eider Articheski down suit.

I have considered a down suit and a bivy bag could work.

I chose a half bag, belay jacket, and, "expedition" gloves.

Because I choose lightweight over Heavy stuff, if I can.

I have made a snow cave, rather than carry more gear.

That said, my not so lightweight Sierra Designs "Perfect" winter sleeping bag was used in one snow cave in extended "white out" on a "fourteener".

Are we back "on-topic"?

1:02 p.m. on July 23, 2011 (EDT)
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What is a "fourteener"?

2:45 p.m. on July 23, 2011 (EDT)
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14,000+ ft summit.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fourteener

Colorado has quite a few.

http://www.14ers.org/

5:43 p.m. on July 23, 2011 (EDT)
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ocalacomputerguy said:

What is a "fourteener"?

 Baker's dozen'er  +  one'er.

                                                 ~r2~

8:56 p.m. on July 23, 2011 (EDT)
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I was asking because I couldn't figure out where the name for my Camelbak pack came from. Now I can't figure out why they a day pack a Fourteener.

11:06 p.m. on July 23, 2011 (EDT)
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The outdoor gear suppliers hire "marketing types" to come up with all these so-called "outdoor" terms.

One would think ... by now ... they would have exhausted the name of every mountain on the planet ... all the obscure Inuit names ....   Oh, how clever.

Also, I think they pay interns that are on college break,  ... you know -- the ones with face piercings, rainbow-dyed hair, and tattooooooozzzz on their necks ... , to come up with quasi- "original" names that are almost unpronounceable.   Probably about $10 per name.

" Ya get what you pay for".

                                                  ~r2~

11:11 p.m. on July 23, 2011 (EDT)
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I'll trade you my "Blue Kazoo" for your  "Talkeetna".

[ insert face-palm emoticon ]

                                                  ~r2~

1:11 a.m. on July 24, 2011 (EDT)
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ConnieD said:

I admit to backpacking:

Alite Designs Monarch Butterfly Chair (not an ensolite pad)

I was not impressed with the Butterfly chair; Only two points touch the ground making it an inherently unstable design.  While you can manage to get the chair to balance, somewhat, you really can’t recline or relax as one can in a Sling Light.  BTW Sling Lite has a great customer service policy, I have several friends who required replacement of sun damaged fabric components after decades of use, and they did so at nominal cost.

9:46 a.m. on July 24, 2011 (EDT)
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Sun damage?

I spray my outdoor gear with 303 Aerospace Protectorant.

That Alite chair requires only a little technique.

I even relax by rocking foreward and back a little, helping to keep the circulation in my legs. I use the heels of my hiking shoes. I really don't like sitting completely still right after activity.

There is also the hammock chair, a small hammock, a more lightweight chair that requires two trees.

"Fourteener" is a name for a Camelbak day pack?

That is a bad "idea".

The "fourteeners" make sudden changes in the weather, even the mountain massifs like parts of Colorado.

Many mountainclimbers are killed on "fourteeners".

The "fourteeners" and winter camping are two examples for the time and place for "Heavy stuff".

For winter camping, I drag a pulk for my gear for my winter base camp.

I forgot to mention the Granite Gear pulk I reviewed, here, at Trailspace.

Because of my experiences in and around Mountain Rescue, I happen to think any hike is not a "day hike".

I always carry sufficient gear for an overnight.

I make that point clear in my website http://ultralightbackpackingonline.info

I made that website, because I didn't like having to rescue people who have read a book on the subject or read the popular magazines. I decided I would do rescue prevention instead.

3:26 p.m. on July 24, 2011 (EDT)
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@ ConnieD-

"It is the lightweight and ultralightweight backpacking enthusiasts who prove that hiking and backpacking to beautiful places does not have to be an ordeal."

That may very well be true to an extent....

.....Hmmmmmm.... My big question is what do you consider to be an "ordeal?"

I would consider being above a treeline trapped in a bivy for multiple days in a storm to be an ordeal when compared to maybe carring a heavier, more robust tent(with alot more room/comfort.)

Isn't that solely dependent upon where you are going, how long you plan on being there, climate, terrain, etc not too mention what one personally believes is needed in order for them comfortable as well as safe?

Its, more of a personal preference thing as far as what I have learned over the many years of being out and about. I have on many occasions played pack mule with what I was carrying in my kit and have not considered it to be an ordeal in the least.

I do not knock the UL crowd at all. I own some UL gear. Alot of it seems to be a compromise when it comes to over-all comfort(not to mention durability) when you take into consideration some of the comforts that can be eliminated when utilizing this type of gear which can turn a trip that would have been quite enjoyable to one that many may consider an ordeal because... well, you're not comfortable.

Just my opinion based on years of experience. Some may agree, some may not.

11:57 a.m. on July 25, 2011 (EDT)
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I see you looked at the first page of my website.

I think there may be about 100 printed pages if printed out.

I consider "an ordeal" having to carry the pack of a U.S. Navy seal who packed over 120 lbs for "exercize" by loosening the straps of his pack and carrying it over the top of my own pack, because he ignored orders to hydrate well days ahead and forgo the use of salt tablets, and so, he had "charley horses" in both legs.

Tough guy... a man's man.

The trip leader, George Martin, had ordered me to get him and his U.S. Navy seal "buddy" safely off the mountain. His "buddy" wanted to go the wrong direction, at one point, but the trip leader had said he would report them to their commander if they didn't do everything I told them.

I was a 15 year old "little girl".

It was my first year as a "rope leader".

I had been "sponsored" into the mountaineering program.

In the U.S. Army, I had to train the trainers because they didn't want "a girl" showing them, literally, "the ropes" for rapid descent facing in, facing partially in, or facing out shooting.

I am responsible for the trailing manuals that show something about how "to find a different route to get back out". Before that, the training was only "to accomplish the mission".

I have been criticized for buying popular magazines "off the shelf" but I do it to see what stupid thing people will do next.

Now, that I am 65 years old and after many years of "saving lives" I still rescue idiots. But I wonder why...

I am tempted to leave people to their own folly.

I had Glacier National Park "backcountry park rangers" ask me how I "survived" four days below -38 F. It was just outside the park.

I was incredulous: It was no big deal.

In fact, the warmest day, at -38 F I walked 4-miles to town and back to "socialize" over a cup of coffee at the grocery store in St. Mary. I walked out and back, because it was such a pleasant day with no wind.

On another occasion, I walked 18 miles out and back to feed horses, because the owner has to be in Shelby, MT. Her horses survived a "late winter storm" that killed most livestock.

The fact is, most people die from "exposure" in mild temperatures.

I believe being able to do stay out overnight actually "empowers" a person for the outdoors.

I believe, if you "feel safe" because you know you can be overnight in inclement weather, you are less likely to panic, and, less likely to do unecessarily stupid things.

I see people plodding along, head down, like a pack mule.

I think they are having "an ordeal".

I know they are unaware of their surroundings, not looking around, unaware of the trail back out if there is more than one trail.

I cringe when I see them heading into the back country, relying on their cell phones (often useless) or their GPS they do not know how to use.

I have even had to rescue boy scouts and girl scouts. Well, almost.

I said, "Do I have to"? I did say where they are.

I had stayed up, nearly all night, trying to do "preventative rescue".

Their leader lied, at the end, saying he had spoken to the park ranger.

He also lied, telling me they would not start at the base of the Nisqually Glacier after all.

Park Ranger Jim Whittaker and the sherpas with him got them safely out from the ice fall at the base of Nisqually Glacier.

I hope they were jailed and fined, at least the leaders.

I hope they were sued for "reckless endangerment".

I have been writing my website, adding to it here and there, because of the stupid things people were doing, like having to be rescued for exposure for hiking for many days naked-in-the-wilderness (ooh, the sunburn) with only "Moose Goo" for food.

If you read my website, you may see I encourage people in intelligent use of lightweight and, yes, even UL gear so they have a "good experience" in the outdoors, but, importantly, (at least most important to me) they may find out they may comfortably carry what they need if unexpectedly caught out overnight.

12:34 p.m. on July 25, 2011 (EDT)
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Hey Connie, I actually looked at more than just the 1st page lol, I checked out the gear sections, etc.

Sooo I came across a few things on your previous post that triggered my curiousity:

" by loosening the straps of his pack and carrying it over the top of my own pack, because he ignored orders to hydrate well days ahead and forgo the use of salt tablets, and so, he had "charley horses" in both legs.

Out of curiousity why would you carry the packs in this manner? I could see no reason other than size or how technical the route travelled was being that it would definitely cause stability issues. That is a load of weight. It would have made alot of sense to maybe adjust the loads between the 2 packs, place the larger one on your back and reverse the smaller of the 2 so the pack body is on the front of your body. This certainly would have distributed the weight more evenly and made it alot more manageable. Then again at the age of 15 this may very well have been an afterthought.

"In the U.S. Army, I had to train the trainers because they didn't want "a girl" showing them, literally, "the ropes" for rapid descent facing in, facing partially in, or facing out shooting."

I was a 19K10. I know exactly where you are going with this one. Men never want to be shown up by the women(the whole pride thing.)

You seem like quite an interesting individual with alot of insight to offer.

Welcome to Trailspace ConnieD, I look forward to hearing more from you as well as reading your posts, etc. I am gonna check out your site a bit more. I love to learn things. I am sure I can learn a bit from you.

10:45 a.m. on July 26, 2011 (EDT)
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I had to carry his pack.

He could not.

His pack was absolutely huge. It fit best cinched down over the top of my pack.

I had a stability problem: descending a rock face facing out I slipped a bit and deeply cut the palm of my hand. I looked inside before the fluids obscured everything there was to see. The sheaths on the bone and ligaments was not scuffed. I used small butterfly bandages. I got no scar.

His "buddy" was otherwise occupied: he had to assist him, for much of it clamping him to his side and "walking him out".

I did my best, taking them around almost all the rock faces.

I never tried to "show up" the men.

I think people can learn something from almost anyone.

Prejudice is, for the most part, ignorant.

1:43 a.m. on December 9, 2011 (EST)
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Unnecessary weight....

Moved to this existing thread to keep "New Thread" numbers down.- f_klock

What is the one thing(if you could pick only 1) that others would find completely unnecessary that you feel the need to take on your trips through the backcountry just because it matters to you?

Its that one thing you just can't leave on your journey without...

2:27 a.m. on December 9, 2011 (EST)
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Re: Unnecessary weight....

This subject was very similarly covered a few months ago, maybe you want to bump this one up?

http://www.trailspace.com/forums/gear-selection/topics/91734.html

Answer,  Christine, aka wife, trailname Boobalicious.  Can only hit the trail without her between December and March, and thats starting to change.  She wants to go up Tucks this winter.  She's on the hunt for a winter bag.   I've created a monster, soon she'll be bagging more days than me.  

I love it.

2:47 a.m. on December 9, 2011 (EST)
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Re: Unnecessary weight....

Eh, there is a slight difference. This thread could be very open. It is not necessarily revolved around "gear."

It could be anything. 

3:24 a.m. on December 9, 2011 (EST)
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Re: Unnecessary weight....

If you read it through (Heavy stuff thread) you'll see responses from books to fresh foods to belly fat.  

mikemorrow thread HEAVY STUFF said;

Extra weight that you carry just for the joy of having it with you.

rick thread UNNECESSARY WEIGHT said;

you feel the need to take on your trips through the backcountry just because it matters to you

Six of one, half dozen of the other.  

Maybe its just me, but I can't seem to separate the two.  Too much coffee?

3:46 a.m. on December 9, 2011 (EST)
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Re: Unnecessary weight....

Eh, maybe man. I dunno. I was thinkin in the realms of even if ya bring the kid out there is that one blanket or bear they just can't leave at home.

Like I said, not necessarily revolved around gear but just that one thing that others would go "huh" at...

I just thought it was a fun subject that needed revived....

6:06 a.m. on December 9, 2011 (EST)
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Re: Unnecessary weight....

Personal hygiene supplies and habits.  I like the feeling of being clean at the day's end, in clean, dry, clothes.  Most of my companions seem to use camping as an excuse to duck washing, and wear the same unwashed underwear for a week.  They mock my bathing and clothes washing "ceremonies."  They have no idea how much fresher the outdoors are when you can view, smell, and touch nature without the tone of smell from your own funk degrading the experience.

Ed

10:18 a.m. on December 9, 2011 (EST)
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Re: Unnecessary weight....

Well probably half my pack, but...  If only one thing...  I guess that would be my new sleeping pad (Exped SynMat 9 Pump DLX), although it's not that heavy, I consider it a required item, most would probably consider it a luxury item.  Oh well, good sleep is VERY important to me.  :) 

Wolfman

10:53 a.m. on December 9, 2011 (EST)
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Re: Unnecessary weight....

 

I used to carry a huge Bowie knife (was 12 inches long by 2 inches wide) with me cause I used it to chop wood but I have'nt carryed it in a long time. Actually cause it was stolen once when I was camping in Jackson Hole, WY.

Now I never take anything that is not needed or too heavy. I don't even take solid water bottles (Nalgene,etc) anymore just my two 3 liter Camelbak's as empty they take up very little room.

11:36 a.m. on December 9, 2011 (EST)
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Re: Unnecessary weight....

I take 2 books to read with me. Most hikers have maybe one paperback. I take hardcover if thats what I have.I like to keep my reading going even when I am on the trail.Generally it would be something outdoor related but doesn't have to be.

11:55 a.m. on December 9, 2011 (EST)
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Re: Unnecessary weight....

my pacemaker :)

12:34 p.m. on December 9, 2011 (EST)
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Re: Unnecessary weight....

My answers are still good from the other thread.  Good reads here.

12:56 p.m. on December 9, 2011 (EST)
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Re: Unnecessary weight....

Denis said:

I take 2 books to read with me. Most hikers have maybe one paperback. I take hardcover if thats what I have.I like to keep my reading going even when I am on the trail.Generally it would be something outdoor related but doesn't have to be.

 

Now adays one could take a Amazon Kindle with stored books on it to reduce the weight of regular reading material.

I am thinking of getting a Kindle Fire to be able to load my digital images from my camera onto when I am in the backcountry instead of my usual way of using just 4GB memory cards and just keep shooting for months. Its hard to download all the images later when I get back to town as I shoot about 400 pictures a day.

1:27 p.m. on December 9, 2011 (EST)
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Re: Unnecessary weight....

BIG Canon 60D. I could take a smaller cam....and do...but not at the expense of leaving behind my Canon 60D.

1:27 p.m. on December 9, 2011 (EST)
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Re: Unnecessary weight....

GaryPalmer said:

Denis said:

I take 2 books to read with me. Most hikers have maybe one paperback. I take hardcover if thats what I have.I like to keep my reading going even when I am on the trail.Generally it would be something outdoor related but doesn't have to be.

 

Now adays one could take a Amazon Kindle with stored books on it to reduce the weight of regular reading material.

I am thinking of getting a Kindle Fire to be able to load my digital images from my camera onto when I am in the backcountry instead of my usual way of using just 4GB memory cards and just keep shooting for months. Its hard to download all the images later when I get back to town as I shoot about 400 pictures a day.

 The kindle I thought about but I like the natural feel; of a book. Just like a campfire when hiking. But gary 400 pictures a day ? you need a kindle!

1:46 p.m. on December 9, 2011 (EST)
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Re: Unnecessary weight....

Gary,

There are several companies that sell a device called a "photostore". The one I use currently is by Jobo Giga Vu, with an 80 GB capacity. I have used it in some fairly harsh climates (Africa, Antarctica). I have had it for about 5 years now. I had two other brands previously (actually still have them) that were not as good (harder to use, shorter battery life). Nice thing about the Giga Vu is that it has a reasonable viewing screen and some edit capability built in. The newer versions go up to 500GB. They will store and display lots of image formats (I use RAW for my important photos, plus a couple of video formats that my DSLRs and GoPro use).

For the Peru trip (Cordillera Blanca Environmental Expedition 2011), I had the netbook with me and just copied the images onto a 32G SD card from the SD and CF cards via the netcook (plug the image card in one slot and make a folder for the day's images on the backup card). SD cards come up to 128G size these days, and pretty cheap, too. I didn't need the stand-alone capability of the Giga Vu since I had the netbook with Photoshop on it.

Yeah, you might think the netbook was "unnecessary weight" But not when you are on a scientific research expedition where you have to back up data from electronic instrumentation and the documentary imagery.

1:56 p.m. on December 9, 2011 (EST)
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Re: Unnecessary weight....

Thanks Bill!

2:37 p.m. on December 9, 2011 (EST)
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Re: Unnecessary weight....

Probably my lights.

UCO Candle Lantern

headlanp

flashlight

2 battery powered string lights.

I guess also my MP3 Player and mini speakers. I know some are against having them on the trail, but I like my tunes when needed. Doesn't mean I always use it, but I can if I want.

Something to read.

Rolling papers.

2:46 p.m. on December 9, 2011 (EST)
14 reviewer rep
318 forum posts
Re: Unnecessary weight....

I pack a large tarp even though I pack a tent. I also pack an Ontario Knives Spec Plus Survival Machete even though I don't use it most of the time. I just want to carry the weight so I get used to it.

4:09 p.m. on December 9, 2011 (EST)
MODERATOR REVIEW CORPS
658 reviewer rep
2,137 forum posts
Re: Unnecessary weight....

Nikon D7000 with 1 to 3 lenses, and extra batteries.

7:54 p.m. on December 9, 2011 (EST)
0 reviewer rep
1,236 forum posts
Re: Unnecessary weight....

To much tent, larger, stronger, most certainly heavier than I almost always need.  Almost always anyway.

8:53 p.m. on December 9, 2011 (EST)
60 reviewer rep
115 forum posts
Re: Unnecessary weight....

Here in the Green Mountains if I get lured out in May or June in black fly season, I have to take 2 cigars for each day.  I light a corona around midday and to puff while hiking, and a nice big churchill for the evening.  I'm not talkin' Phillies.  I usually take a few RYJ's Viejos some 5 Vegas and Padilla Miami's.  So I have to take a case to carry them in which weighs about 12 oz. plus stogies.  

You'd be amazed at how well a good cigar combats the black flies even after its out the smell keeps em at bay for awhile.  I don't like to smoke,  But given the choices between a smoke and black flies, a cigar not only seems really good, it is really good.  A couple sips of bourbon goes nice with it too, I always have that with. 

9:44 p.m. on December 9, 2011 (EST)
239 reviewer rep
136 forum posts
Re: Unnecessary weight....

The phone , I don't want to, but I have to take it because of my work.  I have been very happy when No Signal message comes up.  I keep it deep in the pack, and it's a big 9oz item.  That's a big candy bar.

10:23 p.m. on December 9, 2011 (EST)
14 reviewer rep
49 forum posts
Re: Unnecessary weight....

too much food, too much clothes. I do most of my hiking in the winter due to my work schedule and im always preparing for the worst and always bring home 2 days worth of food and a couple of garments that werent used except for a pillow.

12:17 a.m. on December 10, 2011 (EST)
REVIEW CORPS
476 reviewer rep
283 forum posts
Re: Unnecessary weight....

overmywaders said:

my pacemaker :)

Another vote for a gun, but I have to admit, I don't carry it as often as I used to.

Also, I REALLY like my GPS and my Canon 7D.

2:04 p.m. on December 10, 2011 (EST)
200 reviewer rep
3,925 forum posts

 

I am considering getting hunting and fishing licesens when I go back out next spring in Utah. I want to start psending more time outdoors than I have in the past. Even tho I used to stay out 275 days a year I spent about 2 days a month just going back into towns to buy food and supplies. If I hunted and fished I could save some money on food, tho the licenses may cost as much as I save?

8:13 a.m. on December 12, 2011 (EST)
2 reviewer rep
9 forum posts
Re: Unnecessary weight....

Bkuti said:

Probably my lights.

UCO Candle Lantern

headlanp

flashlight

2 battery powered string lights.

What are string lights and how do you use them?

Personally I am inclined to go pretty minimal with the lights.  I have threatened to take no lights at all, but thus far have at least taken a 0.2 oz. zipper pull light.

Where I splurge on a heavier item is a camera and associated stuff.  The big DSLR does stay home, but the mid sized 4:3 model and a couple lenses goes along sometimes.

9:23 a.m. on December 12, 2011 (EST)
314 reviewer rep
1,124 forum posts

Now that it is winter, I carry heavier food, tent and a tarp, small radio, chair, Stearns air pad. and a larger backpack.

11:29 a.m. on December 12, 2011 (EST)
245 reviewer rep
1,469 forum posts

Axe with (small) saw and maybe another larger saw.

1:41 a.m. on December 13, 2011 (EST)
0 reviewer rep
40 forum posts
Re: Unnecessary weight....

Bkuti said:

Probably my lights.

UCO Candle Lantern

headlanp

flashlight

2 battery powered string lights.

I guess also my MP3 Player and mini speakers. I know some are against having them on the trail, but I like my tunes when needed. Doesn't mean I always use it, but I can if I want.

Something to read.

Rolling papers.

 Bkuti,

        I like that!...."Rolling papers".....hike on!

9:48 a.m. on December 13, 2011 (EST)
190 reviewer rep
122 forum posts
Re: Unnecessary weight....

Pete Staehling said:

Bkuti said:

Probably my lights.

UCO Candle Lantern

headlanp

flashlight

2 battery powered string lights.

What are string lights and how do you use them?

Personally I am inclined to go pretty minimal with the lights.  I have threatened to take no lights at all, but thus far have at least taken a 0.2 oz. zipper pull light.

Where I splurge on a heavier item is a camera and associated stuff.  The big DSLR does stay home, but the mid sized 4:3 model and a couple lenses goes along sometimes.

Battery powered xmas lights. I go the idea from seeing these:

http://www.trailspace.com/gear/eagles-nest-outfitters/twilight-led-lights/

But after seeing the price ($20), I declined. I went to Walgreens the day after xmas, and found almost the same exact thing, but for $3 on clearance (regular $6). The only difference is the wire is green instead of black. Thats it. Oh, and no fancy storage case. But the battery casing/guts, number of lights and length are all the same. Walgreens even has them in multi color, different shapes (stars and icicles), along with the very useful clear/white lights. Uses 2 AA batteries, which last a long time. I get many, many trips out of a set of batteries, even after leaving them on for way to long. I think they are great. I string em up in the tent for great all around lighting and have also used them outside with me for light/ambiance. ENO lists theirs at 4.5 oz with batteries and case. I would think the Walgreens ones are a bit lighter since there is no case.

I bought about 8 of these two years ago. I'm still on the first two that I opened. Gave two away to friends who love them. I'll be back there after xmas for some more. 

Best tent light IMO.

9:51 a.m. on December 13, 2011 (EST)
190 reviewer rep
122 forum posts
Re: Unnecessary weight....

Schlockmyr said:

Bkuti said:

Probably my lights.

UCO Candle Lantern

headlanp

flashlight

2 battery powered string lights.

I guess also my MP3 Player and mini speakers. I know some are against having them on the trail, but I like my tunes when needed. Doesn't mean I always use it, but I can if I want.

Something to read.

Rolling papers.

 Bkuti,

        I like that!...."Rolling papers".....hike on!

 You never know! Many uses too.

April 18, 2014
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