Trekking poles.... what do you use and why do you like(or dislike)them?

2:29 p.m. on June 25, 2011 (EDT)
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I was thinking as I was responding to a thread about trekking poles. These in my book are a very important item. Lets just say they have saved my tail quite a few times and I will not hit the trail w/o out them. Whether it be a multi-day, or a day hike they are with me.

So Trailspace, what do ya use and why? What are your pros and cons to the models ya use, and if you would change anything what would it be and if ya want to throw in how just for good measure fire away.

I use Leki's Thermolite Aergon XL Antishock. I love these poles.


2011-06-02_19-48-49_95.jpg

- They are light. 17oz for the pair.

- The Aergon grip is awesome. Great grip when wet, and no chafing, rubbing, hotspots, etc. Biggest plus, they are comfortable for me and they clean up easily.

- The carbon tips on them stick where you plant them. Wet, dry, etc. it doesn't matter.

- The grip extension is around 7.5". I will not buy poles w/o some sort of extension. This is very helpful on uphills when ya really do not feel or want to adjust your poles to suit the terrain you are on.

- They are highly adjustable. The length can range from 135cm on the + side to 65cm collapsed. Kids could use these.

- The short anti-shock system works very well. From an estimate there is around 1" of travel. They don't bottom out and they have enough dampening to eliminate vibration. I only liked pogo-sticks as a kid.

- The wrist straps are extremely comfortable and highly adjustable.

- The baskets are just about the perfect size for mud.

- Leki has developed a monopod adapter for the Aergon grip.

- The snow baskets for these are easily changed(screw on/off.)

- They are strong. They support well over 300lbs each.

- The Super Lock system works well. I have heard of issues people have had with this system but I have not encountered a problem to date.

I wouldn't change anything on this model. Leki also has a great warranty(if not the best in the business.) Not to mention for what these poles cost they are a bit cheaper than most hospital visit co-pays.

9:56 p.m. on June 25, 2011 (EDT)
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Grip extension.  Do you mean that the grip extends down the shaft?

10:27 p.m. on June 25, 2011 (EDT)
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Yes, it is the extension of the actual grip that runs down the top shaft of the pole. Here is a pic of what part I am referring too.


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If one was to have a pole w/o an extension I personally feel it would be quite easy to add one. I am just lazy.

11:15 p.m. on June 25, 2011 (EDT)
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A straight wood staff is excellent. About six feet long and 3/4" in diameter. Mine was hazel. Very strong, not too heavy, and instantly adjustable for height (move your hand). Use it in a pendulum manner and flick it ahead of you. Great for downhill travel. Use it for jamming in rocks, holding a pot over the fire, as a tent pole, as a balancing pole, as a nice stout wading staff, to discourage bellweather ewes (nasty creatures), etc.

12:46 a.m. on June 26, 2011 (EDT)
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I am with OMW on this one, I love my hiking staff. It is a little over six feet long, hand selected and lightly worked with a knife to optimize the natural shape and features of the bole for comfort and function. Mine is made of a wild understory beech from a deep gorge. Growing in a rocky, light starved location like that means it was very hardy and slow growing, which produces a very sinuous, strong yet flexible bole.

A staff is fantastic for all the reasons QMW mentioned, and is much more effective at dealing with critters than a hiking pole.

1:08 a.m. on June 26, 2011 (EDT)
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I thought the way we deal with critters and especially bears was with our knives... Didn't we discuss that on a prior thread? ;)

4:01 a.m. on June 26, 2011 (EDT)
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Knives? Actually I have a French long sword in case I run into bears :)-although we have do not have bears anymore, which is sad since it is the official animal/symbol of Germany.

4:13 a.m. on June 26, 2011 (EDT)
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I use a Leki MaKalu with the snow attachment only in the winter for the extra footing and the ability to prod ahead for holes/water under the snow. It is light weight, comfortable on the hands, and quick to adjust length. I do not use a pole when there is no snow, I rather keep my hands free for the camera, or I like the feel of wood from a stick I find in the wild.

10:18 a.m. on June 26, 2011 (EDT)
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I'm torn on this one. Untill now I always just picked one up along the trail, but recently recieved the Makalu's as a gift. Havn't had a chance to test them out yet. Both have their advantages and disadvantages. I did like that any stick found was basically disposable and it didn't matter if I forgot it after stopping for a break, lunch, etc. Although by the sounds of it Gonzan has put more time and effort into his, hence he ain't losing it! The antishock on the Leki's is nice, and I could see that been a welcome change from a walkng stick, as well as being able to compact the poles and attaching them to my pack. (Just bought the Ospry aether 60, I believe you recommended it in another thread rick). Poles work nicely with the 'stow and go' system. I need some time trying out the poles before I've made up my mind one way or the other.

11:50 a.m. on June 26, 2011 (EDT)
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Yeah I love Osprey packs. They just work for me. I have an Aether 70 in magma(currently out on loan to my cousin.) From what he has told me I may have trouble getting it back. He keeps bringing up how much he likes it. Hell, his bday(16th) is coming up so I may just pick up a new one and snag my belt off the one he has been using for the past months.

I also have a Stratos 26 as my day pack. Can't say enough positive things as far as what ya get in the Osprey packs plus the warranty is bombproof.

Then again packs are like boots. Its all about fit and that is more of an individual thing but if an Osprey feels good I really can't see to much negative to them. They just work for me.

10:20 p.m. on June 26, 2011 (EDT)
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My favorite trekking or skiing poles are the Black Diamonds with the flip locks.Have never had them slip,like my Leki poles have,and they adjust very fast.Also love the Osprey packs,have both the Either 70 and the Kestrel 38.If they fit you they are awesome.I do not use them in the winter because snow builds up between my back and the pack but for 3 season use I love them,very comfortable packs and well made.

9:08 a.m. on June 27, 2011 (EDT)
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I also prefer these to any others, tried Lekis over ten years ago, did not care for the "anti-shock" feature and then bought Komperdell C3s, once of which collapsed on me on a very tricky bit of trail in the mountains here, nearly sending me into a rushing creek about 50 yds. across and 10-12 feet deep, snowmelt, whitewater and this ended my use of these, except in city hill training walks.

I bought the topend BDs, with "fliplocks" and am totally happy with them and while I used to carry an iceaxe on my treks, I now use and prefer these and seldom use my iceaxe.

6:20 p.m. on June 27, 2011 (EDT)
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I have the Black-Diamond "Alpine Carbon Corks" with the 'flicklock' system.  These are sturdy and stalwart.   Maybe "overkill' for most mundane hiking; but, when the occasion calls for the need of real sturdy sticks,  "I'm good".

BTW -- I am partial to cork grips.   I did mention in another thread ... one can merely clean them with de-natured alky, and scuff them with light sandpaper or emory cloth to refresh the grippage.

~r2~

9:04 p.m. on June 27, 2011 (EDT)
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Absolutely agreed on the value of trekking poles.

On climbs, they distribute your weight and help you maintain balance. Four legs is better than two.

On descents they save your feet and legs from impact- especially the shock absorbing models. They also enable you to sort of "ski" down trails covering a lot of ground very quickly.

When I was on the long route up Kilimanjaro I discovered the value of trekking poles and have used them all over the world. From high camp on Kilimanjaro I ran most of the descent and got down in no time at all. The trekking poles were a huge help.

They simply take load off your legs and I think that keeps them fresher.

9:50 p.m. on June 27, 2011 (EDT)
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Thanks for this thread.  TPs are another piece of equipment I don't own but am now considering.

11:31 p.m. on June 27, 2011 (EDT)
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Hey Zeno, they help tremendously. Not too mention when your legs get tired they can help maintain your forward momentum. Alot of benefit to using them.

3:26 a.m. on June 28, 2011 (EDT)
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overmywaders said:

A straight wood staff is excellent. About six feet long and 3/4" in diameter...

 I too vote for a staff, however, I use those lightweight steel tubular poles you get at the garden shop to stake up saplings.  The green plastic coating is textured, and provides excellent grip.  Since the staff is fit to grip anywhere along it length, it instantly adapts to each specific situation, where you might use it to assist navigating difficult terrain.  Oh did I mention this solution is also VERY CHEAP?

Ed

3:37 a.m. on June 28, 2011 (EDT)
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Skimanjohn said:

My favorite trekking or skiing poles are the Black Diamonds with the flip locks...

 I have some BD telescoping poles from the 1980s I use in snow.  Length is adjusted by twisting the shaft joints in opposing directions, causing a boss inside the pole shaft to expand and lock.  I have misgivings about this lock design; you have to tighten it real hard to be bomber, and water can freeze in the mechanism, making it very difficult to unlock and re-adjust.

Ed

8:28 a.m. on June 28, 2011 (EDT)
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Ricks aware of my thoughts on the subject because we started talking lekki's a month ago. But I never used trekking poles until my buddy dave asked if I tried them. I owned them but I was more of not haveing anything in my hand when I hiked. But he sent me a Youtube video on the use and advantage. I then practiced with them prior to heading out. I really like them and they do aleviate pressure on my knee's. With a staff like Gonzan say's my buddy old moe use's one he has had for 6 yrs now and likes it. Same reason as Gonzan. He say's trekking poles remind him of skiing and thats what their for. I find the trekking pole can also help you increase your hiking speed when you want to. You get a rythem and it just flows. Myop on that. just be careful at night hiking. LOL I lost a toe nail by kicking a large rock.

11:50 a.m. on June 28, 2011 (EDT)
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denis daly said:

Ricks aware of my thoughts on the subject because we started talking lekki's a month ago. But I never used trekking poles until my buddy dave asked if I tried them. I owned them but I was more of not haveing anything in my hand when I hiked. But he sent me a Youtube video on the use and advantage. I then practiced with them prior to heading out. I really like them and they do aleviate pressure on my knee's. With a staff like Gonzan say's my buddy old moe use's one he has had for 6 yrs now and likes it. Same reason as Gonzan. He say's trekking poles remind him of skiing and thats what their for. I find the trekking pole can also help you increase your hiking speed when you want to. You get a rythem and it just flows. Myop on that. just be careful at night hiking. LOL I lost a toe nail by kicking a large rock.

 ...and I thought you were gonna say you put a pole through the toe of your boot. I've harpooned my sleep pad a few times when I had my poles attached to my pack. It increased ventilation for summer use so no biggie. :p

 I totally agree with ya on the speed/rhythm aspect of using them. There were I few times on my last trip I was watching scenery blow apast me and I was thinkin "man I'm moving." I ended up covering 27 miles in one day. Skipped a shelter site, and still made the next one early into night fall.

As far as night hiking goes I won't do it unless the headlamp I am using is at least 50 lumens(I'm on a Petzl kick now.) Just my personal preference from using lights that were less than adequate for this type of use.

7:38 p.m. on June 28, 2011 (EDT)
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Chiming in late.

I have a pair of LEKI Makalu with the Aergon Cor-tec grip & super locks.

I can never decide whether I like the cork grip or the foam grip the best. I like the cork for winter, and the foam for warmer weather I suppose.

I don't have any complaints, the poles work fine and I like the straps and strap adjustment. The tips hold up good and other than loosing one once (my fault), I haven't had any trouble with them.

Anyhow, they do what I need them to do and have been reliable for me.

8:37 p.m. on June 28, 2011 (EDT)
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I also have and really like the Black Diamong Alpine Carbon Cork poles. It was my first pair of poles so I don't really have anything to compare them to. But for me they work great, are light, and comfortable.

11:30 p.m. on June 28, 2011 (EDT)
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Black Diamomd Trail Shocks w/flip locks. Also my first set of poles so I cant compare them to others, but sure do like em. The locks have never slipped yet. The rubber grips work on my hands towards the end of the day so Ive been considering using some shorty gloves. I also use the rubber tips, I get tired of hearing the click click click on the desert trails. They lose a little bit of grip with the rubber tips, but if you keep your swing a little tighter/shorter it helps with this problem.  

7:43 p.m. on June 29, 2011 (EDT)
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I've used Black Diamond Trail poles for the past few years and like them. Very reliable.

But I just spent 2 months testing a very different kind of pole called Pacer Poles from the UK. Radically different, and I really like them. I'm going to switch to them full time. They have a completely different hand grip and let you recruit your arms, torso, and back muscles for more propulsion and lift, instead of just stabilization. This was a real eye opener for me.

7:49 p.m. on June 29, 2011 (EDT)
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Interesting. I will definitely look into them. Thanks for the heads up philip.

6:47 a.m. on June 30, 2011 (EDT)
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Just posted a review on SectionHiker.com. I grew up in the burgh, ya know.

7:17 a.m. on June 30, 2011 (EDT)
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I actually wasn't aware of that. If ya ever have a hunger for a Primantis sandwich email me. Maybe I can fed-ex one your way. :)

8:51 a.m. on June 30, 2011 (EDT)
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Most people I hike with use trekking poles. I am like Rick, I take them on every trip, whether a backpack or day hike. Even on flat Louisiana trails I find they help you maintain balance and speed. I also find they make me feel safer when making a water crossing.

 

5:42 a.m. on July 1, 2011 (EDT)
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philipwerner said:

I've used Black Diamond Trail poles for the past few years and like them. Very reliable.

But I just spent 2 months testing a very different kind of pole called Pacer Poles from the UK. Radically different, and I really like them. I'm going to switch to them full time. They have a completely different hand grip and let you recruit your arms, torso, and back muscles for more propulsion and lift, instead of just stabilization. This was a real eye opener for me.

 Here: www.pacerpoles.com

Oddly, I had thought about fab'ing something like these handles, which I feel are the key feature of the poles.  Mine would have been 'crude', compared to the ergonomic  design Heather developed..

I was on crutches several times ... and toward the end of the rehab periods, I found a short cane, with a "T"-handle was very helpful.  Somewhat the same principle.

Interesting.

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9:12 a.m. on July 3, 2011 (EDT)
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I own a pair of REI poles I bought awhile back at one of their garage sales. I use them because it just gives your a bit better support especially on those steep hills. Plus I have a bad knee from football so it helps a lot again support wise. The con is that you're lugging another piece of equipment and they can be a bit irrittating jangling aroung outside your pack when your not using them.

8:33 a.m. on July 4, 2011 (EDT)
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buffdaddy said:

 ...  I have a bad knee from football ...

 

Just about everyone I know that played football, does.

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6:00 p.m. on July 4, 2011 (EDT)
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Cost of of playing the game I guess. Don't get me started on the injuries I suffered when I played baseball. Still got a bad ankle almost twenty years on when my spikes caught the bag when sliding into second. When your young you just shake it off, but it always comes back to haunt you when you start getting up there.

7:29 p.m. on July 4, 2011 (EDT)
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Tell me about it ....

I raced dirt-bikes (the motorcycle kind, not the ones that you pedal).  I'm feeling every broken bone, now.

Poor Travis Pastrana.   The dude is doomed.

He's making the 'big-bucks', now.   Oh, well ....

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3:14 a.m. on July 5, 2011 (EDT)
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Yeah I have a bunch of old injuries from sports. Not to mention quite a few from riding. I've had every bike from a Honda Mini Trail 50 to a CR 500. Almost ripped my foot off on a Honda 250r 3 wheeler. It all catches up with ya eventually.

9:18 a.m. on July 5, 2011 (EDT)
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Did they (some Fed'l agency) outlaw 3-wheelers?

I have a buddy that was a M/C rider on the AMA -pro circuit many years ago.   He had his share of spills while racing, but nothing serious. 

Then, while riding a 3-wheeler in the field near his home,  just for fun, he flipped it and broke his arm.   The X-rays looked like an overhead view of a train-wreck.

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12:09 p.m. on July 5, 2011 (EDT)
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Yeah, they were 86d :)

10:10 p.m. on July 5, 2011 (EDT)
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I switched to Black Diamond Ultralight Z poles this summer.

Things I like:  super light weight (under 10oz /pair), break down very small like avalanche poles (much shorter broken down than my telescoping Lekis)

Things I don't like: cost (too expensive), fixed size - comes in different sizes, but not adjustable like telescoping poles...which I liked on side hills.

Overall though... I really like them!

7:18 a.m. on July 6, 2011 (EDT)
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Rick-Pittsburgh said:

Yeah I have a bunch of old injuries...

Don’t mean to unnerve you, Rick, but you aren't old enough to have "old" injuries.  If they bother you now, best not ever slack off on staying in shape; otherwise you'll feel like an absolute wreak about the time ARRP starts sending you their brochure.

Ed 

8:23 a.m. on July 6, 2011 (EDT)
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whomeworry said:

Rick-Pittsburgh said:

Yeah I have a bunch of old injuries...

Don’t mean to unnerve you, Rick, but you aren't old enough to have "old" injuries.  If they bother you now, best not ever slack off on staying in shape; otherwise you'll feel like an absolute wreak about the time ARRP starts sending you their brochure.

Ed 

 

Lol, thanks Ed. I do have some things from back in Jr High that still give me aches today. Funny you should mention it. It is one of the reasons why I workout. Too many gym types concentrate on weight training only. I do alot of cardio as well.

I definitely feel things alot more now today compared to when I was 18. :(

10:19 a.m. on July 6, 2011 (EDT)
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Just noticed something in the Chest-Hugging Backpack thread. Take a look at the http://www.aarnusa.com/  site and look at the handles on the trekking poles in the picture of the guy on the right and the "X-Ray" picture at the bottom. 

10:30 a.m. on July 6, 2011 (EDT)
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Just from a quick look that would be a sensible design for posture but I see one problem off the bat with the pack. You would have to get the front to way the same to balance out the back(which is 3x larger in volume.)

Never the less I will look at it further just to see if I am missing something.

11:25 a.m. on July 6, 2011 (EDT)
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I have a set of poles that I use on occasion, though typically I'll carry just one.  I find that is more than adequate for me.  It leaves one hand free and offers enough stability when needed.  I usually use it to push aside something blocking the path or to give the occasional rattlesnake a little incentive to move on his way.

Two poles would have been nice hiking the Narrows Top Down in Zion, though.

7:51 p.m. on July 6, 2011 (EDT)
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Had a buddy in high school that a 3 wheeler and messed himself up royaly. Took a spill on some concrete and of course wasn't wearing a helmet and cracked his skull open.

I've seen comercials for those 3 wheeler motorcycles and they look pretty interesting.

1:37 a.m. on July 7, 2011 (EDT)
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Are you talking about the Can Am Spider/ T-Rex type with the dual wheels in the front?

6:39 a.m. on July 7, 2011 (EDT)
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Rick-Pittsburgh said:

Are you talking about the Can Am Spider/ T-Rex type with the dual wheels in the front?

 No, they mean the old school tricycle configured ATCs.  Too many people were breaking legs under the rear wheels, the result of dragging a foot around turns, etc.

Ed

6:58 a.m. on July 7, 2011 (EDT)
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whomeworry said:


 No, they mean the old school tricycle configured ATCs.

Ed

 

Would you be meaning ATVs ??

  These dreadful acronyms are soooooo confusing for me .... and others, I would opine.  Here at Trailspace, they are used with increasing abandon, wherein the posters wrongfully assume EVERYONE knows what they are meaning.   A few more key-strokes would make a significant improvement.

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11:31 a.m. on July 7, 2011 (EDT)
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Rick-Pittsburgh said:

Are you talking about the Can Am Spider/ T-Rex type with the dual wheels in the front?

 No, they mean the old school tricycle configured ATCs.  Too many people were breaking legs under the rear wheels, the result of dragging a foot around turns, etc.

Ed

 

Well if he has seen commercials I highly doubt he is talking the old school trikes(Honda, Kawasaki(Tecate,) Yamaha.)

I was asking about the latter half of his statement.

1:03 p.m. on July 7, 2011 (EDT)
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The old school 3 wheelers are dangerous.

1:10 p.m. on July 7, 2011 (EDT)
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i have an old pair of telescoping aluminum poles, but i don't really use them except for winter.  i know they are supposed to save your knees, improve your balance, etc., but i haven't gravitated toward them.  maybe a nice carbon shaft, cork handle, easy length adjustment and shock absorber would change all that....

7:50 p.m. on July 7, 2011 (EDT)
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Rick-Pittsburgh said:

Are you talking about the Can Am Spider/ T-Rex type with the dual wheels in the front?

 I believe so, there 2 wheels in the front and one in the back. I'm assuming their touring bikes?

2:43 a.m. on July 8, 2011 (EDT)
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i have an old pair of telescoping aluminum poles, but i don't really use them except for winter.  i know they are supposed to save your knees, improve your balance, etc., but i haven't gravitated toward them.  maybe a nice carbon shaft, cork handle, easy length adjustment and shock absorber would change all that....

 

One of my biggest issues with carbon is if they break they are useless. If ya bend an aluminum shaft there is a good chance they can still be used. Might be something ya may wanna consider.

3:04 a.m. on July 8, 2011 (EDT)
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back in the day, 3 wheelers like the Honda and Kawasaki where called ATC's (all terrain cycle) When the outlawed the sale of ATC's they switched to calling the sporty 4 wheeled, 2 wheel drive models Quads. Once they figured out people wanted 4 wheeldrive on these machines they then called those ATV's which now covers most anything just short of a Jeep.

  I had one of the Honda 3 wheelers back in the early 90's. I enjoyed puttsing around on it more then haul'n ass and fly'n high. You could mess yourself up in a hurry with it forsure! They were prone to rolling sorta sideways and would whip ya to the ground like a rag doll. Never got hurt seriously but sure had my bash's, gash's and bruises from that thing

3:48 a.m. on July 8, 2011 (EDT)
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Robert Rowe said:

Would you be meaning ATVs ??

  These dreadful acronyms are soooooo confusing for me .... and others, I would opine...  ..A few more key-strokes would make a significant improvement.

 I did mean ATC (note logo in image below); It is generally assumed ATVs have four wheels, though one could argue ATCs are technically a subset of ATVs.  Hope that clears up everything!
ATC.jpg

Your opine is noted; however, you are guilty as anyone of the very behavior you take exception with, for example this comment you posted previously in this very discussion thread:  

..I have a buddy that was a M/C rider on the AMA -pro circuit many years ago... 

If something someone posts escapes your comprehension, perhaps you could make some effort to ellucidate yourself, should something ellude your comprehension.  I don't even do motor sports, so it is not like ATC is some obscure insider's acronym, at least no more arcane than M/C or AMA.  Certainly if I have the time to confirm I have my achronyms straight, or for that matter desypher some of the rather crptic albeit wry comments you tend to post, then perhaps you may find the time to do such footwork on your own behalf.  JMHO!

PS: NIIMTAPC (not interested in making this a pissing contest:) )

Ed

8:04 a.m. on July 8, 2011 (EDT)
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The M/C and the AMA acronyms were solely intended for the attention of the poster alluding to  motorcycle racing and related activities ... as  the post-topic had 'morphed' into that direction; almost like a "sidebar".

For motorsports enthusiast's own consumption.  NOT the general hiking / backpacking community.

For example; had a particular thread evolved ( or "devolved") into subject matter addressing music and music-instruments ....  a plethora of acronyms would be generated; to which most here ( unless they were musicians ) would be "lost in space".

Yes -- I do tend to use wry, sometimes vague, comments.   Mostly, with humor as the underlying theme.   Those that "get it" probably chuckle; those that do not ... well, let's just say they probably simply glance-over that to which I am alluding, and move on.

You will notice I ask questions ... often.   Usually, endeavoring to glean some sense of what is being meant by things like acronyms.

I don't look for faults here.   If I were the "spelling, grammar and punctuation Nazi" ( and I have the background to be one ), I would have a field day here.   Not my "bag".   The lack of capitalization ( like first-person "i", instead of the correct "I)  is bothersome ... to me, at least.   But, it's like "fighting City Hall".   However; I do not adhere to the "when in Rome, do as the Romans do" adage.   To me ... it is the "dumbing-down of America".  Abject laziness and apathy.; which is far worse than ignorance.

Just as that almost obsolete Latin jargon the legal community uses.   Probably, to obfuscate their intentions of fleecing the public.   I think (?) we all (most of us) know their little game by now.  Respecting and protecting our rights,  and abiding by the Constitution are sometimes "hi-jacked".  By-the-way (btw ?), the Constitution and the Magna Carta were not written in Latin.   Hmmm ....   No perjorative inference on my part, but I am reminded of Shakespeare's line in "King Henry VI" ... Part 2, Act IV ... Scene 2.

Oh, well ....

Pax vobiscum sit semper.

Klaatu barada nikto.

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8:28 a.m. on July 8, 2011 (EDT)
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Ed-Ugggghhhhh. Thats the same 3 wheeler that almost ate my foot. Honda 250r

9:50 a.m. on July 8, 2011 (EDT)
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If, we could return to the topic of this thread, trekking poles. I really have no interest in ATCs, in fact, I loath these machines and they are not relevant to a hiking forum, IMHO.

Some here like wooden staffs, cut from trailside growth and I have used such supports many times. However, I really prefer the telescoping poles now available as the long, heavy staffs are not useful in steep, alpine terrain and can actually be dangerous in such conditions.

I have found that the trekking poles can be used in the widest variety of conditions and I consider them to be among the most useful developments in backpacking, equal to the internal frame pack. YMMV, of course.

10:28 a.m. on July 8, 2011 (EDT)
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Dewey said:

If, we could return to the topic of this thread, trekking poles. I really have no interest in ATCs, in fact, I loath these machines and they are not relevant to a hiking forum, IMHO.

 

I agree.  ATVs, ACT, 4-wheelers, etc., probably only appeal to hunters, here.  I believe (?)  they use them to haul-out their kill, from remote areas.

I have never used one ... do not intent to, either.

Now ... if a SAR ( "Holy Acronym, Batman !" ) was hauling my butt out of a bad situation, on one, I wouldn't complain.

10:48 a.m. on July 8, 2011 (EDT)
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Since SAR was an aspect of my duties in my employment for many years and I worked with the Canadian Forces Survival School guys at one of their training facilities in the Canadian Rockies, I can tell you that "quads" are not often useful in this work. The preferred method is to longline a rescued tourist out with a SAR "tech" in a harness and usually to just suspend the "bagged" remains below the bird on a line. For major injuries the "Clamshell" attached to a skid is used to bring out the victim, but, here, lost and/or injured trekkers, are usually found dead, so, they are just bagged.

Quads, have their place in forestry, mining, agriculture and, maybe some hunting, but, they are a blight on the landscape here in BC and I have come to detest them and the camo-clad wannabes who "hunt" from them. It never fails, some have to wreck things for everyone, much like the hikers who leave TP and food containers in wilderness campsites......I better stop, ,my blood pressure is rising.......

11:44 a.m. on July 8, 2011 (EDT)
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I always use two.  Ironically, when I slepped 60lb loads I didn't use them.  Now that I pack lightweight, I do.  But not in all situations.  As mentioned above, sometimes two get in the way - bushwacking or on really tight trails.  Then one gets collapsed and put at the side of my pack.  I also use trekking poles to set up my shelter.

Black Diamond for me.

July 31, 2014
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