Boot all-stars.

10:48 a.m. on July 1, 2011 (EDT)
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I had another thread idea. If you had one boot to choose whether it be a past or present model what would be your all time favorite model? It doesn't have to be a model you currently own or even a model that is still in production.

I know its gonna be hard being alot of us are into the whole 4 season thing (what works in the winter may not necessarily be prime for the summer.) Then again, I have worn my Tevas in the snow a few times......

So Trailspace, if you had one boot you could get your paws on what would it be and why?

12:38 p.m. on July 1, 2011 (EDT)
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There are three:

Galibier Super Guide

Galibier Vercours-have a minty pair I found here and wish I could get two more pairs

Kastinger FGL-double bellows tongue leather lined climbing boot- mine are 30 years old, on their third set of soles and still in excellent shape and they have MILES on them. These, are the best boots I have ever had and only the superb Galibiers were/are their equal.

1:26 p.m. on July 1, 2011 (EDT)
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RTFD'ing ...

I'd have to go with (not unexpectedly) one of two pairs of Fabiono's I have; the heavy-duty backpacking-hiking ones (says "00063" inside the boot ... can't recall the name).

I have another pair from the late 1970s ...  but they are mountaineering jobs ...  "Herman Munster" specials.   NOT for regular usage.

BTW -- I have had Limmers, Raichle's, Asolo's, Lowa's, Danners,   Red-Wings, Herman Survivors (they used to make a hiking boot) ... and others I can't recall right now.   Also, several pairs of US Military boots that were darned good (Paratroopers, Jungle, etc.)., over the years.

Fabiano as THE ONE.

__________________________________

 ~r2~

9:14 p.m. on July 1, 2011 (EDT)
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Limmer lightweights!

2:51 p.m. on July 2, 2011 (EDT)
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Pivetta Eights - rough-out and comfortable. Can't say enough good about them. They last forever and stay dry inside (unless you wade deep streams) during a long day of hills. Good edging, too.

9:20 p.m. on July 2, 2011 (EDT)
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I've got to second the Eights...


DSCN0464.jpg

That's with about 400 miles on them. They're maybe halfway to being "broken in"; I still get a little pinching on the outside pinkie toe, but nothing that limits me in any way. Otherwise, they are the best-fitting, most durable, most comfortable boots I've worn out of, say, 30 pairs? They actually hold my skinny heels!

These boots climb WELL! As mentioned above, they edge very well, and while the shank does allow limited forefoot flex, I have climbed 5.10 in them. I really see them as an all-mountain boot though, suitable for the approach as well as the climb. I've logged many 10+ mile days in these over Western Colorado slickrock; while the stiff leather midsole does transmit the shock of a hard surface, it is precisely this "responsive" midsole construction which allows such impressive performance on vertical rock. With any luck, these will last me a couple dozen seasons, just getting better and better with time...

But what boot would I clamor to have? A pair of A-width, size 11 Pivetta Spiders.

1:47 p.m. on July 3, 2011 (EDT)
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Just picked up my first pair of real boots, Alico Tahoe's.  Can't wait to get some miles on them, they should be here by Wednesday.

2:39 p.m. on July 3, 2011 (EDT)
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Good stuff .ghost. Your feet will know the difference in quality of a real boot as opposed to an imaginary one. Not to mention your socks will last substantially longer. Lol. I just had too. :)

4:30 p.m. on July 3, 2011 (EDT)
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Limmer Standards.  great design (one piece of leather, only big seam is instep rather than backstay), excellent materials, extremely well put-together, and super-comfortable once they are broken in.  nary a blister since the first three weeks i had them.  only issue has been that the metal lacing hardware ate the original laces in 18 months, but the replacement laces, round webbing cut to size, have been an awesome solution (suggested on this forum!).

the only way i could see being happier would be a custom pair of the same boots, but after a number of years, these feel like custom boots anyway. 

9:00 p.m. on July 3, 2011 (EDT)
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That reminds me, the only thing better than the Pivetta Eights is the Pivetta Fives - because the Fives have all eyelets and don't cut laces like hooks do, or break like D-rings. Of course, the Pivetta Eiger also has eyelets but it is too much boot for me.

1:18 a.m. on July 4, 2011 (EDT)
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OMW and PT, where does one buy these Pivetta boots? I have heard the name since the early '70s and yet have never seen a pair of these; I have had a lot of boots and some not well known ones, such as "Eiger D'arbelles" and still have not had a chance to try these.

The above pix show a boot that is exactly what I want for almost everything as I detest these new "throwaway" GT-fabric and "leatherette" pos models we are offered now and want some REAL leather boots. Please advise and help an old geezer to continue slowly staggering along the mountain byways of BC, alone with his befogged memories of past glories during the halcyon days of the '60s........

1:40 a.m. on July 4, 2011 (EDT)
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OMW and PT, where does one buy these Pivetta boots? I have heard the name since the early '70s and yet have never seen a pair of these; I have had a lot of boots and some not well known ones, such as "Eiger D'arbelles" and still have not had a chance to try these.

The above pix show a boot that is exactly what I want for almost everything as I detest these new "throwaway" GT-fabric and "leatherette" pos models we are offered now and want some REAL leather boots. Please advise and help an old geezer to continue slowly staggering along the mountain byways of BC, alone with his befogged memories of past glories during the halcyon days of the '60s........

 

"Leatherette," what is that lol?

8:37 a.m. on July 4, 2011 (EDT)
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Rick-Pittsburgh said:


"Leatherette," what is that lol?

 

Faux leather.   Essentially, "expanded vinyl", that is supposed to resemble real leather.   Is generally embossed with a fine, grainy pattern, to mimic that of real leather.   Was used a great deal for auto upholstery over many years.

~r2~

8:46 a.m. on July 4, 2011 (EDT)
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Dewey said:...

 ... Where does one buy these Pivetta boots? ...

 

Go here: www.aloharag.com/highseas/product

Look for "Golden Goose" under the "Men's Brands" listings.

Make sure you are sitting down, before you check the tariff ($$).   Also, see if your bank loan-officer is willing to extend you a short-term 2nd mortgage on your property.

Gotta say, though, with that cool,  pivoting heel-crampon, they certainly are unique.   Dunno (?) what they might do to your nice, cherry hardwood flooring ... or, linoleum, for that matter ....

But wait, Nigel !   They're on sale !!!!   "If you buy today .... ".

   Aaaarrrrghhh ....

_________________________________________

~r2~

9:31 a.m. on July 4, 2011 (EDT)
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Just a note: The Golden Goose variety mentioned above are NOT Pivettas, in my opinion. Yes, they have somehow licensed the Pivetta name, but they are certainly not crafted by the same little Italian shop which created Pivetta boots in the 70's. Simply put, the Golden Goose boot is a fashion piece, made for yuppies. These older boots are the only "real" Pivettas out there, and the only place I've seen them offered for sale is Ebay. They were built in Italy, using a modified Munson last (they put in a little more arch support), and imported to the states by the Berkeley Ski Hut until the late 70's, when the original hardmen of Yosemite moved on to other things...

Dewey: You'll have to search ebay pretty regularly to find them in a large-ish size: most of the examples that show up are on the smaller end of the size spectrum. The "all-mountain" models I know of, in order of decreasing stoutness: Eiger, "Eights" (Article Eight, or P-8), "Fives" (Article Five, or P-5), Muir Trail. I am far from an expert on the subject though, and most of what I know about Pivettas I gleaned from overmywaders...

11:15 a.m. on July 4, 2011 (EDT)
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When searching for them on ebay, a good search phrase will include "DMC" because Pivettas were made for DMC - Donner Mountain Corporation. Here is a search I use and just receive emails whenever a Pivetta boot appears - (hiking,trekking,backpacking) boot* (DMC,Pivetta) -dvd

I search both title and description.

Oh, and go by the actual outsole length (insole length, if they have it) and the width at ball of foot. The width Pivetta uses "A, AA, etc." refer to the width of the heel, not the ball as we use today.

Good luck.

6:18 p.m. on July 4, 2011 (EDT)
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overmywaders said:

.... The width Pivetta uses "A, AA, etc." refer to the width of the heel, not the ball  ....

 Strange.

And what, may I ask, is considered "Normal" width ... and "Wide" width in Pivetta speak.

~r2~

8:42 p.m. on July 4, 2011 (EDT)
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GREAT thread.  I've wondered about this for a long time.  Before being fascinated with packs, I found boots incredibly interesting.

6:33 a.m. on July 5, 2011 (EDT)
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9:39 a.m. on July 5, 2011 (EDT)
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Interesting link.

However; I did not see where Pivetta sizing was explained (unless I missed it).

Also, scrolling down to the bottom, I noted that the 1973 price of Limmers was $65.

~r2~

9:48 a.m. on July 5, 2011 (EDT)
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I've wondered how the Colorado brand boot tested and was considered by the more serious hiking and backpacking crowd.  I wouldn't bring them up here, but in that article, I see they tested JCPenny and Chippewa.  Those Colorados couldn't have been any lesser than that, and from appearance, quite a bit above both of those.  They were incredibly popular in the late-70s and early-80s.  Possibly sold by Kinney and in many mall shoe stores.  "Colorado" stamped with a series of mountains as their logo on the outside ankle area of each boot.  If memory serves, they had two models.  One was your basic lighter brown with red laces, and the other was a darker brown with striped laces that came a bit higher on the ankle.  They may have even been made in Italy.  The darker brown model was maybe $75-90, while the lighter brown was $50-60.

Here's the lesser model:

http://cgi.ebay.com/KINNEY-WOMENS-5-SHOES-6-COLORADO-HIKING-BOOTS-ITALY-/320713795037

10:58 a.m. on July 5, 2011 (EDT)
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OMW/PT, thankyou, gentlemen, for your advice, it is what I, sadly, expected as so many of the wonderful boots we could buy in the '70s have either been transformed into "fairy feet" or are no longer made.

On, the rush to"ultralight" gear, many fine packs,etc. have been cast aside so that "fashion" and "cool" now rules the gearshops....thankfully, Mystery Ranch and McHale are still going strong and there are custom boot makers, such as John Calden, from whom I will buy my next boots.

What can ya do, it sucks, but, serious wilderness trekkers are few in number compared with the trail walkers and urban "cool" gear buyers and, "money talks".

11:10 a.m. on July 5, 2011 (EDT)
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The colorado boots were junk, save your money.  Back in the day, JC Penny actually made some good, not great, but good gear.  Hard to imagine today.

I am hesitant to buy boots from ebay because they might not fit and I don't want to have to resell them if they do not fit.

Top of my list at the moment are a pair of Limmers.  I may someday break down and mail order a pair.  If I ever get anywhere close to their store I will make a point of going there and buying a pair in person.

Vasque made two models of boots and I want both, but can never find them in my size - I might actually bid on them if they showed up on ebay.

The first is this one - think the model was the highlander.

http://www.etsy.com/listing/39432071/vintage-vasque-leather-hiking-boots-made  Classic look, all leather, littleway welt.  Perfect for moderate backpacking.

The second was a more robust boot, selling on ebay at the moment.

http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=130541312322&ssPageName=STRK:MEWAX:IT#ht_500wt_1357

I once found a pair at a thrift store and would have kept them had they fit, but my feet are a half size larger than they used to be.

Vasque made these in the mid 80's.  These were a step up from what they had made prior.

11:19 a.m. on July 5, 2011 (EDT)
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I wasn't looking to buy a pair of Colorados now.  I was just curious to know if they were total junk, respectable, or what.

1:31 p.m. on July 5, 2011 (EDT)
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My Scarpas have the Littleway stitch. As far as Colorado goes I have had their work boots a few times. They weren't bad, they weren't great they were average. For a hiking boot I wouldn't buy them. Not for the terrain I run into.

 

2:35 p.m. on July 5, 2011 (EDT)
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I have a pair of the first Vasques and they are superb. IMO, Vasque (Redwing) made excellent boots in their early years. I'm not too hot on the high boots they produced with the bulging circles on the side.

2:49 p.m. on July 5, 2011 (EDT)
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what do you mean by the bulging circles on the side?

4:03 p.m. on July 5, 2011 (EDT)
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7:43 p.m. on July 5, 2011 (EDT)
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bulding circles or no, that is one of the models I would love to have in size 11.

2:28 a.m. on July 6, 2011 (EDT)
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This brings back memories OMW. When I was in my early years of hiking(early teens) I got a pair of that very same boot as a hand me down backpacking boot. They didn't fit me exactly perfect(a lil big) but I loved those boots. They were fairly well worn but still in good shape. I put alot of miles and made 2 season worth of memories in those boots. If I could find them in a 46 I would buy them in a heartbeat. Not necessarily to wear but just to have to give me a reminder of fond memories of the past.

2:36 a.m. on July 6, 2011 (EDT)
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i had friends that did really well with vasque boots, both older and newer styles. i have picked up a couple of pair used that were my size and invariably they would really hurt my feet by the end of the day. something about the last just didn't work with my feet. 

i have had good luck with red wing 877's they come new with a flat neoprene sole. on a new pair before i ever wore them i would have the local cobbler put a set of bob soles right on top of the neoprene. because they are a flat soled shoe they do not have or need a shank. true moccasin construction with a bob sole.

from working in the woods i have found the bob sole to be superior to the vibram in really wet and snowy conditions. the bobs will self clean and still give you traction while the vibrams tended to pack with mud and snow more. the downside of the bob sole is that it will not last near as long as a vibram sole 

i had pivetta 5's in the 70's that i bought new. they were great boots but a little too heavy for me. always wished i would have bought muir trail shoes instead. the shop i worked at got pivettas from donner mountain corporation. i do not recall the pivetta 8, or spider models. just muir trail, 5, and eiger models. even back then it could be tough to get your size as donner mountain did not always seem to not have every size in stock.

for really wet conditions nothing has worked better for me than white pack boots. i have two pairs, one bob soled and the other pair are corks. heavy boots but i sure put some miles on them. maybe some of the best leather i have ever used.

7:56 a.m. on July 6, 2011 (EDT)
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lazya4 ~~

What is a "bob sole" ? 

I don't think I've encountered that term ... might be something I AM aware of, but call by a different name.

I have heard of a "Bob Dole", though.

________________________________

 ~r2~

9:29 a.m. on July 6, 2011 (EDT)
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airbobsole.jpg

10:01 a.m. on July 6, 2011 (EDT)
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OK.   Thanks, Rick.

Looks like a rubber-version of the old 'hob-nail' boots the SS wore (WWII).

If I talk to my local cobbler ... is he going to know what these are?

_________________________________

 ~r2~

11:08 a.m. on July 6, 2011 (EDT)
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I have three pairs of boots with those, my Russell High Country Hunters, custom-made for me in 1988 and among the worst boots I have ever had, good for walking my dogs and useless in mountain terrain. I have older Schnee pacs with them as well and also a superb pair of Kastinger FGL climbing boots that I treasure and save for hunting.

These were supposed to be "THE" soles to have in the late '80s, but, I have not found them superior to Vibram Montagna Bloc, the ITALIAN ones, not the US types. In fact, I will not buy more and have a spare set which is larger than I require.

I find V-MB soles better on rock and equal elsewhere and the bobs are only better on ice.

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