Single person tents

8:25 p.m. on July 20, 2011 (EDT)
3 reviewer rep
170 forum posts

I'm looking for a new tent.  My experiences with other tents have led me to look for certain characteristics.  This will be a three season tent used mainly for one person. 

 

 It should be a dome tent which helps with shedding rain, should have decent ventilation to keep condensation down and not be a single wall tent.  It should be a very light two person tent where I can store my pack inside or a single person with a vestibule that will hold a pack and boots.  If the bottom or tub were heavier fabric and more waterproof than the fly that would be great.  Three pounds or less would also be great.  I'm a firm believer in lightening up your load.

 

Here are some of the negatives I have experienced with the other tents I own (no, I won't name names :) )

Single wall tents and condensation.

Single wall tents and sagging which then lets water in.

Tents that leak through the bottom or through poorly designed seams.

Anything other than a taut dome seems to allow water some way in.

Single wall tents can be very light, the tent I just used on a rainy trip in the Trinity Alps did ok with keeping me fairly dry but it weighs too much.  In all fairness to the tent it is over 20 years old and probably needs to be replaced.

Some of the tents I am considering are the MSR Hubba Hubba, Big Agnes Seedhouse SL1, REI Quarterdome, Sierra Designs (one person, light weight dome, can't recall the name)

Any real life experience with light weight one and two person tents along with any experience your friends have had would be welcome.  Please remember the criteria listed above.

 

Thanks,

Don

8:34 p.m. on July 20, 2011 (EDT)
1,631 reviewer rep
3,962 forum posts

I have a BA Copper Spur UL1 and I love this tent. For a solo its pretty big inside, lightweight, and very weatherproof. Also its completely free standing.

This is actually considered a modified A-frame. It does not leak. I just had it on a 80 mile trip and I got hammered at night for 3 of the 6 nights I was on trail. I as well as my gear was dry. Not a leak anywhere.

3lbs packed weight
2011-05-02_17-19-11_152.jpg
2011-05-02_17-19-34_607.jpg
2011-05-02_18-39-24_142.jpg

 

This model can also be set in a fast-fly set(no inner.) 2lb/2oz in fast fly set
2011-05-13_13-47-10_29.jpg
2011-05-13_13-47-57_873.jpg


On trail


2011-06-14_18-34-57_498.jpg

Awesome tent if you can swallow the price.

Trailspace reviews:

http://www.trailspace.com/gear/big-agnes/copper-spur-ul1/

Info from BA:

http://www.bigagnes.com/Products/Detail/Tent/CopperSpurUL1

I personally believe this to be the best 3 season free standing solo on the market.

Its also not cramped. I can lay inside on my back with my fingers interlocked behind my head with my arms out to the side and I sill have 6" in either direction.

9:05 p.m. on July 20, 2011 (EDT)
3 reviewer rep
170 forum posts

Rick,

 

Thanks, I'm not sure how I missed the Copper Spur in my research.  It looks like it has a nice sized vestibule and in one of the reviews JC1970 said he used it in the north west in the rain and had no problems with leaking or condensation.  Were you using a ground sheet under the tent? 

 

Where were you hiking and do you know how much rain you had?  This tent might have just shot to the top of my list.

 

Don

9:24 p.m. on July 20, 2011 (EDT)
1,631 reviewer rep
3,962 forum posts

Yeah I was using the footprint. I found a package deal where I got the fp included in the deal. You also have to have it in order to fast pitch the tent because there are grommet points on it and there are also buckles to secure the fly. The floor on this type of tent is thin. I wouldn't use it w/o a footprint of some type.

Vesti wise I can fit my Osprey Aether 70 in it with my boots and still have room to get in and out w/o climbing over stuff.

Also if you look at the pic with the fly off there is a zipper panel. When the fly is on you can open this zipper and put your boots under the fly on that side if you want.

I was in the Laurel Highlands in S.W. Pa. I did the LHHT from Ohiopyle to Seward. The 1st 2 nights of rain were steady pretty much all night.  The 3rd night was about 2hrs but there was some pretty nasty wind with it. Dropped a few large trees on the mountain. The Spur handled it w/o a problem.

9:30 p.m. on July 20, 2011 (EDT)
87 reviewer rep
1,057 forum posts

The Hubba bubba as well as big Agnes are tops. Have you looked into Nemo OB1? that hits your criteria as well they also are gaining high marks with light weight backpackers. Just another option for you..

9:44 p.m. on July 20, 2011 (EDT)
1,631 reviewer rep
3,962 forum posts

Nemos are very nice too.

9:54 p.m. on July 20, 2011 (EDT)
3 reviewer rep
170 forum posts

I haven't looked at the Nemo OB1, I'll check it out.  I posted the same question on a different forum and got a snarky, informationless reply right off the bat.  From a moderator, no less! 

9:58 p.m. on July 20, 2011 (EDT)
1,631 reviewer rep
3,962 forum posts

Thats not a good representation of the site. Yikes. Everyone here tries to be as helpful as we can.

9:58 p.m. on July 20, 2011 (EDT)
3 reviewer rep
170 forum posts

I just looked at the Nemo OB1P and the Nano Elite.  Both look like good tents.  Thanks for the tip now I have more stuff to wade through on the internetz!

10:04 p.m. on July 20, 2011 (EDT)
1,631 reviewer rep
3,962 forum posts

Lol, a tent purchase can be a real pain in the you know what. There are so many choices out there. When ya think you are ready 4 more models pop up. Enough to drive ya nuts. I have been looking at Bivies for the last few months.

10:09 p.m. on July 20, 2011 (EDT)
3 reviewer rep
170 forum posts

I just asked the mods to delete the thread I started on another forum.  Two people telling me that pads are for insulation, not comfort and one suggestion to pack a trash bag full of old leaves.  The posts here have been a lot more informative!  Thanks again.

10:11 p.m. on July 20, 2011 (EDT)
1,631 reviewer rep
3,962 forum posts

Never a problem, glad to be of help.

12:16 a.m. on July 21, 2011 (EDT)
102 reviewer rep
2,276 forum posts

Don:

The Hubba is a great three season 1P tent.  It has a dry entry design, more roomy than most one person tents, yet light.  It does not have interior room for a pack, nor do I consider the vestibule adequate for that purpose.  The Hubba Hubba will accommodate your pack, but you may consider the Hubba in light of your desire to go lighter, and instead stow you pack outside in a large plastic garbage bag.  This solution is lighter than using a larger tent that accommodates a pack.  You do not need access to all of your gear when tent time comes anyway; only items related to sleeping and a change of clothes for the next day.  Place only these things in your tent or vestibule; no need to put the whole pack in there with you.

Leaky bottoms are easily addressed by using a footprint AND better tent site selection.  The only time in over forty years camping experience I have ever had leaky bottom problems (not that kind of leaky bottom wise guys) was in scouts when an adult assigned out tent locations.

Ed

12:42 a.m. on July 21, 2011 (EDT)
0 reviewer rep
910 forum posts

I'm not an expert on tents but I do own two Alps Mountaineering tents. A Zephyr 3 and Chaos 3. They make a very neat tent. The Mystique 1.5.


mystique-15.png
mystique-15-fly.png


mystique-15-diagram.png
It's not the lightest weight at 4lb 3oz but Alps gear is usually made out of slightly tougher materials. If you don't mind 5lb 6oz take a look at the Chaos 2. It's a sweet tent. It's a dome with a spreader bar giving it vertical walls and the non door sides are also vertical for the first foot or so. 




1:04 p.m. on July 21, 2011 (EDT)
0 reviewer rep
1,075 forum posts

Rick-Pittsburgh said:

Lol, a tent purchase can be a real pain in the you know what. There are so many choices out there. When ya think you are ready 4 more models pop up. Enough to drive ya nuts. I have been looking at Bivies for the last few months.

 I couldn't agree more.  Personally I think tents are one of the hardest pieces of gear to select.  These various tent discussions have been informative, but also highlight that there are no perfect options, only tradeoffs when it comes to space, weight, performance and cost.

The photo of the sagging ultralight tent in the single wall tent post is a good example - no chance in hell I want to get out of my bag in the middle of the night and adjust guy lines.

In my dreams I see a field of tents set up in rows so I can crawl in and out of them until I find the perfect tent.

1:45 p.m. on July 21, 2011 (EDT)
245 reviewer rep
1,469 forum posts

I had a ALPS Trtion 1.5 and changed to a bigger, lighter and more easily assembled MH Skyledge 2.1 and love it.

2:12 p.m. on July 21, 2011 (EDT)
200 reviewer rep
4,071 forum posts

 

I have a single person tent now made by Mtn Hardwear. I bought it because it was lightweight (4 lbs?) last spring but do not like its small sleeping area. It has a large rainfly vestibule on either side but outside the bug netting.


Meridian-2-tent.jpg

12:30 a.m. on July 22, 2011 (EDT)
1,631 reviewer rep
3,962 forum posts

Maybe take a look at the Golite Eden, as well as Terra Nova's line... Granted they are not domes, or moified a-frames, etc. but they are light and pretty nice shelters.

The Hille Akto with optional mesh inner may be an option. Then ya have a 3 season and a 4 season solo.

Just figured I would throw that out there to to make your search even more confusing.... Happy ummm..... Shopping?

12:51 a.m. on July 22, 2011 (EDT)
0 reviewer rep
1,238 forum posts

Are married persons allowed to use single person tents ?

                                                 ~r2~

1:17 a.m. on July 22, 2011 (EDT)
1,631 reviewer rep
3,962 forum posts

R2- My trips are a little "too long" for her taste. I am pretty much always solo. She likes to camp. Usually at a campsite that isn't far from the car or truck. Oh and she likes our 16' x 10' dual room "TENT" with bay windows... All 54lbs of it... Did I mention there is a port in this portable hotel so I can run electricity in it?

I am just waiting for the day when the mini-fridge from my man cave makes the trip with us. She has fun so that's all that matters.

She let's me go on my trips wherever I want, whenever I want, for as long as I want. She knows how much I just "love" the city(yes I am being sarcastic.) Not too mention if I don't go I start looking at inanimate objects in a real peculiar manner. Then there is the twitching.

I am thinking on my fall or winter LHHT trip doing the South to North(Ohipyle to Seward) trip and then turning around and hitting it from North to South back to the trailhead in Ohiopyle. 160 miles seems like a good time. I don't see any reason I can't do it in 8 days maybe less... I will probably do this in the winter.

7:04 p.m. on July 22, 2011 (EDT)
3 reviewer rep
170 forum posts

Rick,

I've read a bunch of reviews on the Copper Spur UL1 and it seems like a great tent for the money.  My research is far from done yet but if I had to choose right now it would probably be my first choice by far.  The Hilleberg Akto and  a few others also seem like really good tents but the thing about the Akto that worries me is getting it guyed out properly.  It looks a little complicated.  There are a few others that I am going to read up on and a few more sites for me to explore but thanks for bringing up the Copper Spur.

 

Don

7:22 p.m. on July 22, 2011 (EDT)
1,631 reviewer rep
3,962 forum posts

Never a problem Don. For a 3 season solo if I had to do it all over again I would buy the Spur without a 2nd thought.

10:11 p.m. on July 22, 2011 (EDT)
1,631 reviewer rep
3,962 forum posts

I wanted to mention the Spur isn't a tall tent. I can sit up in it but thats about it. The entrance is a little low. So if ya have back problem it may be an issue for ya.

Here is a rundown on the specs. I would like to note that tent dimensions are typically based on outer grommet to grommet measurements.

BIG AGNES Copper Spur UL 1 Tent

  • Floor Area 22 sq. ft.
  • Vestibule Area 10 sq. ft.
  • Floor Coating 1200 mm PU
  • Rainfly Coating 1200 mm PU
  • Doors 1
  • Canopy FabricNylon and polyester mesh
  • Floor Fabric Nylon ripstop(Sil-nylon)
  • Rainfly Fabric Nylon ripstop(Sil-nylon)
  • Freestanding Yes
  • Peak Height 37 in.
  • Packed Size 6 x 18 in.
  • Pole Material DAC TH72M aluminum(Featherlite NSL)

Don, if you would like I can set the tent up tomorrow and get the actual inner dimensions for ya. Just let me know.

 

10:52 p.m. on July 22, 2011 (EDT)
0 reviewer rep
1,236 forum posts

Ahhhhh, takin a break packin for my trip down the OR coast.  With me will be me one of my newer tent finds, The Garuda Jana.  This is a sweet little tent. 35 sq ft + 15 front and rear vestubile.  This is a double wall tent.

gjana2.jpg"The Jana is a solid three-pole four-season tent with two vestibules,
and unique ventilation system. At the peak of the fly Garuda places a hooded
vent designed to allow warm, moist air from the interior to escape. Cool, dry
air is pulled into the tent by a scoop-like cone at the base of the fly at the
rear of the tent.

On our test atop a ridge on the Timpanogos Divide, we found no noticeable
difference in condensation between the Jana and other tents in this review. All
of the tents were dug into the snow, perhaps reducing airflow, but would likely
be common in four season camping.

The front vestibule is large, but the sloping fly limits headroom. The rear
vestibule is small at 3.5 square feet. The front door has 3 zippers for easy
adjustment of door size and position.

Setting up the Jana is simple. Poles thread through continuous pole sleeves
and only three stakes are required. Of course, you'll want to use more stakes to
handle wind.

The main advantage we see is the Jana's light weight, at just under seven
pounds."  of cource that was in 1993 or 94 befoer the UL revolution was so broad based.

This discription taken from http://www.gearreview.com/4tentrev99.asp

This is a three pole tent that took my 3 min to set up the first time without instructions.
DSC04088.jpg
with out the fly
DSC04111.jpg
w/ the fly

I've only  used this tent in fair weather but all the reviews give it top notch billing as a four season tent with the only negitive that I have read by someone on line is that you have to seam seal it yourself (which I always do myself anyway)  I will be re-seam sealing it after this trip.  The tent is free standing with the fly needing three stakes, two in the front and one in the rear.  You do not need any stakes if you do not want to use the vestibules or want a quick set up and want to stake the vestibules  later.  For those who are trying to save a few bucks I found this on craigslist for $150.  This would seen to meet your criteria as listed above with the exception of the weight.

1:53 p.m. on July 23, 2011 (EDT)
3 reviewer rep
170 forum posts

Rick,

 

I actually marked out the dimensions on my back deck and then put my pad and bag down to get an idea of what it would be like.  A couple of tents were ruled out right off the bat because they were between 26 and 29 inches wide.  That would only leave a couple of inches on either side of me and my pad.  If I wanted to feel claustrophobic I could just go with a bivy and save a bunch of money!

apeman,

Sorry, I'm going to have to rule that tent out just on weight alone. 

 

Don

5:49 p.m. on July 23, 2011 (EDT)
1,631 reviewer rep
3,962 forum posts

dm1333 said:

Rick,

 

I actually marked out the dimensions on my back deck and then put my pad and bag down to get an idea of what it would be like.  A couple of tents were ruled out right off the bat because they were between 26 and 29 inches wide.  That would only leave a couple of inches on either side of me and my pad.  If I wanted to feel claustrophobic I could just go with a bivy and save a bunch of money!

apeman,

Sorry, I'm going to have to rule that tent out just on weight alone. 

 

Don

Don,

Just remember the whole grommet to grommet thing I mentioned previously. If you did your measurements based on the manufacturers specs on their sites they may not be an accurate depiction of what the tent interior dimensions actually are. The interior dimensions could be substantially smaller. I personally can't say who does or doesn't utilize this method w/o contacting each and every company individually. I do know that BA does from what I have been told.

I recieved this bit of knowledge when I was inquiring about the CS 1 from a BA rep. Alot of companies utilize this method of measurement from what I have learned and it has become somewhat of a "standard" in the industry.

I personallty think this is silly because I do not know many people who set up their tents and sleep outside of them... Then again maybe I am missing something here.

10:12 p.m. on July 25, 2011 (EDT)
3 reviewer rep
170 forum posts

Now I'm throwing curve balls at myself! 

 

http://www.trailspace.com/gear/easton/kilo/

 

Anybody have experience with this brand of tents?

 

What do you Big Agnes tent owners think of the footprints they make for each tent?  Is it worth the $50 or so?  Or should I stick with a piece of Tyvek?  I saw that Rick Pittsburgh said the floor of his Copper Spur is very thin, are any of the Big Agnes tent bath tubs treated at all?  If the materiel is very thin I'm leaning more towards picking up another piece of Tyvek and making a foot print. 

2:22 a.m. on July 26, 2011 (EDT)
1,631 reviewer rep
3,962 forum posts

Hey Don, I posted this link awhile back. It may be of some use too you as far as footprints go.... at least making your own. I like being able to choose my own materials. Don't know if Tyvex would be numero uno on my list.

I have done this, with a little bit of time and common sense it works. Alot cheaper than the $50 alternative... and if ya do it right, alot more durable.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RueJ7t2J6t0

...as far as Easton goes I would give them a few year on the market to "tweak" their products before I would give the green light on them.

Is the standard BA footprint worth it? Thats kind of a hard question to answer. What do you define as being "worth it?" Not poking a jab, just being honest here.

Nevertheless, as far as the standard BA footprint, I have had no problems with mine.

3:25 p.m. on July 27, 2011 (EDT)
1,631 reviewer rep
3,962 forum posts

... oh I would like to add that the floor of the BA Spur is sil-nylon. I had it setup in the grass in the back yard w/o a footprint when it first arrived.

Well, it rained. I had no problem with moisture penetrating the floor of this tent. I stayed in it that night. I always test tents out in the backyard when I get them. I wait for rain & storms, to roll in and I go outside and set-up the tent.

I would much rather find a failure in the backyard as opposed to out in the middle of nowhere.

The floor on the Spur is highly water resistant from my experiences. The footprint is more for protection from abrasion/punctures, etc.

When you start getting into models that are lightweight this is what ya have(lightweight materials.)  

8:44 p.m. on August 28, 2011 (EDT)
0 reviewer rep
7 forum posts

Why DOME????

Anyway, my last 2 solo tents have been MSR Hubba's and I think they are awesome.  Not SUPER lightweight or anything but light enough for myself, nice height and flexible (FLY only, NEst only or both).

Only negative I can think of is the poles are a bit long for packability...ok, one other...if you are a bit wide then you probably won't like it.

8:48 p.m. on August 28, 2011 (EDT)
1,631 reviewer rep
3,962 forum posts

dredone said:

Why DOME????

Anyway, my last 2 solo tents have been MSR Hubba's and I think they are awesome.  Not SUPER lightweight or anything but light enough for myself, nice height and flexible (FLY only, NEst only or both).

Only negative I can think of is the poles are a bit long for packability...ok, one other...if you are a bit wide then you probably won't like it.

 The only thing I really do not like about the 1P Hubba is when sitting up in its like wearing a hat due to the drastic slope of the ceiling.

10:09 p.m. on August 28, 2011 (EDT)
173 reviewer rep
100 forum posts

I run a tent on occasion, and have come to very similar conclusions.

Freestanding "dome", rainfly, big door, and lots of ventilation is the only way to go IMO. I have some expensive single wall, non freestanding tents that will forever be collecting dust.

I have been using a Eureka Backcountry 1, and it is a great tent. It is not very light (3+ pounds?) but it works. If I am really racking up the miles, I just sleep in a poncho/bivy, so my tent weight isn't super critical.

It's not a fancy tent, by any means, but it does work. Just another option.

I will admit, if I was always using a tent, I would be looking for a more sophisticated/lighter tent of the same basic design as the Eureka Backcountry 1.

 

12:19 p.m. on August 29, 2011 (EDT)
227 reviewer rep
123 forum posts

I'm looking to pick up a Golite Eden 1. It's a non free standing single wall, but it looks to have some great features and is big. A bit heavy at 3 pounds, 5 ounces but it looks/sounds like a bomb shelter, with head room and lots of storage. And the ability to leave the vestibule door open in light/moderate rain is a plus.

2:27 p.m. on August 29, 2011 (EDT)
0 reviewer rep
1,236 forum posts

dm1333 said:   "What do you Big Agnes tent owners think of the footprints they make for each tent?  Is it worth the $50 or so?  Or should I stick with a piece of Tyvek?  I saw that Rick Pittsburgh said the floor of his Copper Spur is very thin, are any of the Big Agnes tent bath tubs treated at all?  If the materiel is very thin I'm leaning more towards picking up another piece of Tyvek and making a foot print."

I personally feel that  smaller footprints are not worth it when you can very, very easily make a foot print for your tent for pennies on the dollar using tyvek and or using fly's from defunt tents.  I had a friend whose tent self destructed on one of my last trips.  It was a cheapy two pole tent wherein the two fiberglass poles decided it was time to break, both of them.  As it was wonderful weather it was pretty funny.  When he went to throw his tent away I took the rain fly as it is seam taped an will make a great footrint for a number of my thinner single wall tents.  $50 vrs. pennies on the dollar (or even free), no, I personally do not think foot prints are worth it for almost all of the smaller tents we discuss here.  Once a tent reaches an area of 50+ sq ft or more I belielve that the foot prints are worth it as the price really does not increase very much for the size of the footprint.  You get way more for your money with a larger footprint than a smaller footprint.

Lets not forget the added bonus that tyvek is many times stronger than any of the materials currently being used for footprints as well as usually being more lite than most footprints.

 

android  said: "Freestanding "dome", rainfly, big door, and lots of ventilation is the only way to go IMO." 

I resemble that remark!!!!!!

2:38 p.m. on August 29, 2011 (EDT)
1,631 reviewer rep
3,962 forum posts

I personally think unless you want to use the fast-fly option no they are not worth the $50 when compared to other options out there. The floor on my BA is sil-nylon. No problems with moisture getting through. 

You cold always go this route on the cheap and still have the webbing to do a fast-fly set, its not that hard to stitch in the buckle points with a lil ingenuity:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RueJ7t2J6t0

This is a nice option that I have done with very good results. You can use whatever material you want. 

10:16 a.m. on August 30, 2011 (EDT)
2 reviewer rep
692 forum posts

For a footprint I use very thin polycro that will last approimately 20 nights or so.  Costs almost nothing and a sheet that is approximately 35 x 90" will weigh a single ounce.

Just a comment regarding adding a footprint to an UL floor.  Why do the manufacturers come out with the UL floor in the first place if they immediately turn around and encourage the purchase of one of their $50 footprints to protect the floor of the tent?  Marketing and greed of course.  They should provide 70d floors to begin with.

1:37 p.m. on August 30, 2011 (EDT)
0 reviewer rep
910 forum posts

It's a lot cheaper to replace the foot print than to repair/replace the tent and if you want to setup your tent without the inner body the foot print is hard to beat.

1:41 p.m. on August 30, 2011 (EDT)
1,631 reviewer rep
3,962 forum posts

CWF said:

Just a comment regarding adding a footprint to an UL floor.  Why do the manufacturers come out with the UL floor in the first place if they immediately turn around and encourage the purchase of one of their $50 footprints to protect the floor of the tent?  Marketing and greed of course.  They should provide 70d floors to begin with.

If they add a heavier floor the tent will no longer be a UL model. 

Heavier floor=heavier tent

If a company was to add a 70d(or 1.9oz before coating) floor to a tent like my Spur for instance it would prolly kick the weight up quite a bit.

Now they do make 70d silnylon which would probably not weigh as much as a PU coated 70d floor but the difference in weight in general would be substantial. 

Then again this would all be dependent on how big the floor area actually is.

4:30 p.m. on August 30, 2011 (EDT)
2 reviewer rep
692 forum posts

@Rick - I understand why they do it but it is marketing dribble.  The difference in weight between a 70d and 30d floor that is approximately 22 sq feet is just under 4oz.  Don't ask me how I know this.

..

4:32 p.m. on August 30, 2011 (EDT)
2 reviewer rep
692 forum posts

ocalacomputerguy said:

It's a lot cheaper to replace the foot print than to repair/replace the tent and if you want to setup your tent without the inner body the foot print is hard to beat.

 Not if you make the floor robust to begin with.  Think about what takes the most abuse.  Floor or canopy.

Regarding the 'fast fly' set up - how many people actually use this?  Most people are deathly afraid of bugs, especially mosquitos.  We aren't going to re-hash the thread on Lightweight Backpacking again, are we?

; )

4:54 p.m. on August 30, 2011 (EDT)
1,631 reviewer rep
3,962 forum posts

CWF said:

The difference in weight between a 70d and 30d floor that is approximately 22 sq feet is just under 4oz.  Don't ask me how I know this...

 Trust me I won't lol. I think alot of people have gotten to the point that they're over doing it when it comes to gram counting. Personally not my cup of tea. 

But nevertheless companies realize this. I never mind playing pack mule if the weight serves a purpose. The only reason I got the footprint is its the only way I can fas pitch my shelter w/o the inner. 

I use this type of set-up quite a bit in the fall. 

My Eureka Mountain Pass tents have a 75d floor(190T) rated at a hydrostatic head of 5000mm(think floor mat in a car.) They are heavy tents and even though they are rated at 3 season I know they can take much more due to the heaviness of all of the materials.  The Fly is 75d as well.

Here is a vid I found on the 3XTE:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9FVQG8ES1ok

5:08 p.m. on August 30, 2011 (EDT)
38 reviewer rep
395 forum posts

Wish I had the $$ right now, REI has the BA Copper Spur UL1 as well as others on a pretty good sale right now.  $261  thats about as cheap as Ive seen them yet.

http://www.rei.com/product/779610/big-agnes-copper-spur-ul1-tent

5:11 p.m. on August 30, 2011 (EDT)
1,631 reviewer rep
3,962 forum posts

Hey azrhino, 

That is definitely a bomber deal on the spur. 

5:37 p.m. on August 30, 2011 (EDT)
38 reviewer rep
395 forum posts

Wazup Rick,

Im trying to forget I have credit cards and need to pay for what Ive purchased on them recently.  But man o man I would like that tent!   This is gonna be tuff holding out for a week when the sale and temptation is over.

5:40 p.m. on August 30, 2011 (EDT)
1,631 reviewer rep
3,962 forum posts

Lol, I go through the same thing. Next tent I get has to be literally bombproof. The wife may very well want to test it once she realizes I bought something else lol.

5:43 p.m. on August 30, 2011 (EDT)
0 reviewer rep
910 forum posts

Gram counters:

It's a contest to see how light you can get your pack and still have a (barely) functional set of gear which seems to always include a toothbrush.

"Dude I cut off my tooth brush handle to save weight."

"Dude I not only cut off the handle I filed down the head thickness and trimmed the bristles."

Round 1 to dude number 2.

Ounce counters:

These people truly want to reduce their pack weight but sometimes get caught up in the fad.

"YOU BOUGHT ANOTHER TENT!?!"

"Yes"

"WHY?  You have a dozen already."

"Only nine. It's 6 ounces lighter than last years tent."

"Wow that's 2/3 of a cup of water. How much did this thing cost."

"$329"

"That's $120 more than last year for less tent! What were you thinking?"

He doesn't know it but round one went to the wife when he said "Yes".

Pound counters:

"Going out for 4 days I've got 65 lbs in my pack."

"Ahh that's nothing... I've got 75 lbs in my pack and I'm only going out for an 2 nights."

"Oh I thought I'd go light this time and left the dutch oven at home."

I'd call that a tie.

5:58 p.m. on August 30, 2011 (EDT)
1,631 reviewer rep
3,962 forum posts

Lol, I love it when you do these Ocala. Funny stuff.

7:56 p.m. on August 30, 2011 (EDT)
38 reviewer rep
395 forum posts

Thats good Ocala!

Im in no way a UL'r or every see myself fitting that tag. If I can keep the pack aournd 40 lbs. give or take Im a happy camper. My latest quest for a new tent is to fill that roomy 1 man need, lite goes along with that. Im just not satisfied with my tent that fills that role now.

I am kind of a gear hound but try to stick with one piece for one job idea. This would be my fourth tent.

1 -  5 man for long term car camping

1 -  2 man for packing or quik & ez car camps

currently 1 -  Lite 1 man to  be replaced by  ?? yet to be determined.

once that is filled that will be the end of my list of tents.  I hear of folks that have a dozen tents and ask myself why? But I guess everybody has their thing.

12:04 a.m. on August 31, 2011 (EDT)
REVIEW CORPS
1,225 reviewer rep
1,259 forum posts

azrhino said:

Wish I had the $$ right now, REI has the BA Copper Spur UL1 as well as others on a pretty good sale right now.  $261  thats about as cheap as Ive seen them yet.

http://www.rei.com/product/779610/big-agnes-copper-spur-ul1-tent

That is good!  Another good source is Mountains Plus (mpgear.com).  They have the UL1 for $297 and they include a "free" footprint.   At REI the footprint is $50 (on sale right now for $37).

I bought mine at mpgear.com last year and they were quick to ship the tent.  The footprint was out of stock (back ordered) but they made good on it once they were in stock a short time later.

I'm guessing if you use this link (and buy it) Trailspace will get a commission:

http://www.trailspace.com/out/cHJvZHVjdHwzMjgzMTR8fDQ4ODMyODM5Mw==

(it's the link from the review page here on TS).

When I bought mine, REI didn't carry them ... everything they had at the time was much heavier than I wanted.  The same thing was true just now when I wanted to buy some water shoes, but that's for another thread.

12:11 a.m. on August 31, 2011 (EDT)
REVIEW CORPS
1,225 reviewer rep
1,259 forum posts

apeman said:

dm1333 said:   "What do you Big Agnes tent owners think of the footprints they make for each tent?  Is it worth the $50 or so?  Or should I stick with a piece of Tyvek?  I saw that Rick Pittsburgh said the floor of his Copper Spur is very thin, are any of the Big Agnes tent bath tubs treated at all?  If the materiel is very thin I'm leaning more towards picking up another piece of Tyvek and making a foot print."

I have the footprint for my Copper Spur UL1 because it came free with the tent purchase. But I have't opened the package. Instead, I've been using a sheet of clear plastic that I cut to size. Coincidentally it came as packing material around the tent :).

Personally I'd hesitate to use this tent without some kind of under-protection. The material is very lightweight.

Anyway, one advantage to using the footprint is that it would be easier to set up the tent. When it's breezy I find I need to set up the tent, then slide the plastic underneath. Otherwise the plastic just blows away. The footprint, however, has little grommet holes to attach to the tent poles when you attach the poles to the tent.

Bottom line for me so far is that if I had to pay the $50 to buy the footprint, I'd probably do something else.  As it turned out, I use the plastic sheet anyway because it's a little lighter than the footprint.

12:22 a.m. on August 31, 2011 (EDT)
REVIEW CORPS
1,225 reviewer rep
1,259 forum posts

Rick-Pittsburgh said:

I wanted to mention the Spur isn't a tall tent. I can sit up in it but thats about it. The entrance is a little low. So if ya have back problem it may be an issue for ya.

This is actually something I was going to comment on.  Most of my use of this tent has been without the fly.  This weekend, however, I used it.  With the fly in place, and just one side opened (like you'd normally have it when expecting rain) it can be tricky to get into the tent.  If the fly were wet, you'd get wet too brushing against it.

This issue is compounded by the design of the door, requiring you to unzip the arch-shaped zipper nearly the full length of the tent to open it fully enough to enter without straining the zipper.

I still like the tent a lot, but using it in wet weather will be a little tricky.

6:03 p.m. on August 31, 2011 (EDT)
38 reviewer rep
395 forum posts

Mountain Plus does have some good sales. Just got a new down bag from there. Had the free 7-10 day shipping, ordered late Wed. night and arrived Mon. morning. Cant beat that.

10:41 p.m. on September 1, 2011 (EDT)
1,631 reviewer rep
3,962 forum posts

dm133- if your interested in taking a look at the Copper Spur 1 a lil more in depth I just fired out a review for it.

http://www.trailspace.com/gear/big-agnes/copper-spur-ul1/review/23539/

10:29 p.m. on September 2, 2011 (EDT)
38 reviewer rep
395 forum posts

REI musta sold out of the Spur UL1. They're not showing it in the sale anymore. I thought they'd go quik at that price

11:37 p.m. on September 2, 2011 (EDT)
2 reviewer rep
692 forum posts

Why not consider the Lynx Pass 1.  Heavier but a lot cheaper with more robust materials.

Even the Fly Creek UL2 is on sale.

July 24, 2014
Quick Reply

Please sign in to reply

 
More Topics
This forum: Older: Vango Force Ten tents... Newer: SweetWater
All forums: Older: Gore-Tex vs non Gore-Tex Newer: Try for Humphreys again this weekend