Regarding Candle Lanterns

11:47 p.m. on August 23, 2011 (EDT)
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contuined from "wanted buy/trade trangia candle lantern" in the Classifieds

@ lazya4:  Here are some picts to show you what I was talking about in reagrds to the lamp oil burner that repalces the candles in a candle lantern.  I like the oil burner for a number of reasons, 1st the candles are suppose to be dripless.  The are only sometimes and if you bump you lantern to hard the wax will come flying out getting all over your gear.  This does not happen with the oil burner. Second, quite often the dripless candles start dripping getting the inside of the lantern coverd in wax making it hard to clean and hard to replace the old candle for a new one, Third I have found no consistancy in how long the candles last so it's hard to know how many to bring, I've had them last 1 1/2 nights (really) and I've had them last almost a week.   Another trailspace member reminded me of this on a recent outing.

From left to right, a never used lantern that I got at a garage sale, three pack of candles that are 15+ years old, My brass candle lantern 20+ years old,  the lamp oil incert that replaces the candle and candle assembely 15+ years old, a bottle of lamp oil.
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Close up of the lamp oil incert with the screw on cap.  This cap screws on very, very tight and does not leak even when tipped over.  In fact if you screw the cap on to tight it takes a pair of pliers to lossen the cap.
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The incert with the cap off, Please note the little loop on the cap so you can hook a lanyard to it so that it does not become lost.
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After much trial and spilling this is the best container I have found to haul and transfer the lamp oil to the incert.  You can use any size bottle you want, whats improtant is the flip spout on the top of the cap.  When I'm done and ready to pack up I carefully pour the remaining oil back into the bottle.  Just like white gas, I have never had a spill.  I have never been out long enough to have to refill a the oil incert.  I believe the longest I have been out is for 7 days and there was still plenty of oil left.

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The remaining reason that I prefer lamp oil over the candles is that one of the last times I went out in really hot weather the three candles I had with me melted making the candle lantern dead weight and leaving me without light.  Lucky for me my friends had a headlamps.

10:29 a.m. on August 24, 2011 (EDT)
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A homemade lantern can be made from a aluminum can and a knife. Cut the can as shown in my picture above and place a candle inside. The inner can makes a good reflective surface. Use the tab on the top of the can as a bail, just flip it up so it stands and use the hole to hang it from.


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11:40 a.m. on August 24, 2011 (EDT)
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gary that's a neat idea with the can.

 

I'm wondering how well the little tab would hold up to being hung though, with the weight of the candle inside.

 

In my experiences those tabs come off really easy

11:56 a.m. on August 24, 2011 (EDT)
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I have used them for just single hiking trips and the tab hold on pretty well. Just don't bend it back and forth too much.

A jar of vaseline petrolium jelly also can be used as a candle. Just push a cotton string down into the middle with a toothpick leaving a wick above the vaseline.

12:26 p.m. on August 24, 2011 (EDT)
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I have and use the oil insert for the UCO candles. I think it's a great, better and a little neater than the candle (though been getting some black suet). I was using it a few weeks ago and it got very windy. The lantern/oil stayed lit, it was all good. Blew the candle out before turning in. In the morning, I noticed the whole top melted (the metal piece was sunk and angled), I take it from the flame being pushed down from the wind. I brought it back to were I bought it and they replaced it, though they tried taking me out of it and taking credit and getting an LED lantern. The guy said it was out dated and just a novelty. I disagreed and took the insert. I have LED's, but when I don't do a camp fire, the little flame is so much nicer than an LED lantern, if you can really call it that. Novelty? maybe to some, but I think functional and provides a better atmosphere. Call me old fashion, but to me a lantern needs a flame or some sort, not just a down reflecting light bulb(s).

Apeman, I like your idea for carrying/storing oil. I pack mine full and brought a little extra in a little water bottle. I never has a leak, and don't want one, so I might just use your idea but maybe a little smaller of a bottle (depending on trip length). Flip spout is nice and I'm sure easier to fill than my method. Great tip, thanks!

1:25 p.m. on August 24, 2011 (EDT)
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@ Bkuti :  I've never had a leak either but I did not want to start.  I Usaed a larger bottle for my last two trips  on the road on my bike as I didn't want to run out as I was gon the last 3  out of 4 weeks along the OR & WA coast.  When backpacking I usuall use a smaler shampoo bottle that the cap in the picture will fit in.  My experiance with getting any soot means you have a bit to much wick pulled out.  I also collect antique oil lamps and have had this experiance far to many times.

@ GaryPalmer : Never have I seen the top of a aluminum can photographed with shuch wonder and grace thanks for the memerable shot, what was the shutter speed and f stop   <{{-;  .

1:30 p.m. on August 24, 2011 (EDT)
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Bkuti said:

The guy said it was out dated and just a novelty.

 Well, in a way, yes, flame lighting is outdated. But so is traveling by foot in the wilderness...

What a sales minded moron.

4:23 p.m. on August 24, 2011 (EDT)
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The candle light is the way to go, at least for me. I have no need to light up the forest with a powerful lamp. But I always carry a small wind-up LED for any wake up call in the middle of the night

6:21 p.m. on August 24, 2011 (EDT)
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Apeman asked: Never have I seen the top of a aluminum can photographed with shuch wonder and grace thanks for the memerable shot, what was the shutter speed and f stop   <{{-;  .

 

Actually I got the image off the internet at Yahoo images. I found it one day when I was advertising some can tabs for a friend who is selling products she makes from them. (She loops them together and them sews them side by side to make hats,vests,belts,etc)


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6:47 p.m. on August 24, 2011 (EDT)
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gary - isn't petroleum jelly flammable??

I remember using dryer lint and vaseline to start a fire.

6:59 p.m. on August 24, 2011 (EDT)
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iClimb said:

gary - isn't petroleum jelly flammable??

I remember using dryer lint and vaseline to start a fire.

 Only if it has something to act as a wick. Dryer lint, fabric of any kind, candle wick, and even hair, lichen or moss will work in a pinch as a wick for any tallow-like oil.

7:03 p.m. on August 24, 2011 (EDT)
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@ iClimb : Since petroleum/vasiline is flamable but not explosive the string/wick will draw the liquide oils out of the gel.  As the gel at the top of the string is consumed it draws more oils up the string.  I have done this before by placing some aluminum foil over the top of the vasiline jar at the rim and running the string thru the foil  therby keeping the flame away form the gel.  I would guess it would be possible to catch the whole jar on fire if you let the wick get to low ont the jar but I have never seen this happen.  After putting your string into the vasiline I usually let it set for 24 hrs befor using as it takes awhile for the oils to soak up into the string.  If the oil is not soaked up into the string the string will just burn away instead of acting as a wick.  The same principle as if you have an oil lamp that runs out of oil,  the wick will burn down.

8:03 p.m. on August 24, 2011 (EDT)
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I've owned and used a brass candle lantern for about 30 years.  They are wonderful little things.  Though I have to admit, I don't use it much these days.  It's a lot heavier than an LED light and I'm trying to lighten my load.

I didn't know about the lamp oil insert.  I'm gonna have to look for one of those!

8:29 p.m. on August 24, 2011 (EDT)
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@apeman: yea unfortunately I haven't been able to get out for more than a few days lately so I don't need much oil. I still like your methods though even, for an overnighter.

@gonzan: I really think a lot of retail clerks in outfitters are hypnotized by vendors. They speak like they are reading out of a text book. I had one guy working at a store that actually told me how the vendors want to market their stuff. And most of it is bull crap sales. They also give clerks a lot of free stuff to butter them up. Eureka was marketing their tents at the campnor store in NJ as "east coast tent" and thats what the clerks were saying to everyone. All the other brands they carry (Marmot, TNF, MSR, Kelty, etc) are west coast tent. How about that!

@Gary: Nice jewelry! 

@Jim: Check out the oil insert, you'll never want a candle again.

It's kinda odd that UCO doesn't have them on their site or trailspace for the matter. I contacted trailspace out it and didn't get a reply. But here it is at campmor:

http://www.campmor.com/outdoor/gear/Product___87535

12:35 a.m. on August 26, 2011 (EDT)
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Thanks for the link.  I found them over on Amazon, too.

8:46 a.m. on August 26, 2011 (EDT)
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I have used candle lanterns, or home made candle holders for years.

I just like them, they are heavier than a small led light, messier too, but a real flame has character & charm that a electric light does not in my opinion. I do not take them on trips where I have to travel light and hike every day, but I do enjoy them on trips where I will set up a camp for a few days and stay put.

I have not tried the oil insert, but that sounds like a very good idea, thanks for the tips guys.

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