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Adirondacks, Winter Alpine Camping

12:04 p.m. on December 1, 2011 (EST)
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I am headed to the Adirondacks in January and I was hoping to spend one night above treeeline, but I am only familiar with the High Peaks region and it is forbidden there. Any suggestions for trips elsewhere that would give me access to such a place? 2-3 nights.

3:26 p.m. on December 1, 2011 (EST)
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anywhere above 3000 or 3500ft (I forget which) is forbidden in winter in the adirondacks and cats. you can go to the ADK main page and read all the rules and regs. there is a handful of shelters in exposed areas, but not above treeline necessarily. I can't think of anywhere in the Northeast that you can camp above treeline in winter, except for maybe a few spots on the Long Trail in vt.

go west if you want above treeline in winter.

5:02 p.m. on December 1, 2011 (EST)
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Wait a miin!  The treeline is 3,500 ft? Wow!

Why can't you camp up there in the winter? What would it hurt?

Yes. come out west to get above the treeline.  Rockys have okay access. Cascades are also doable if you have skis. 

The treeline here (Cascades) is closer to 5,500 feet and closer to 9,000 ft in the Rockys. Either way, expect a 2,000-3,000 foot elevation gain through snow to get there this time of year. 

5:43 p.m. on December 1, 2011 (EST)
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Hmm, I believe you can in the Whites in NH during winter months. But, that trip will be after NY :)

5:53 p.m. on December 1, 2011 (EST)
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"Except in an emergency or between December 15th and April 30th, camping is prohibited above an elevation of 4,000 feet in the Adirondacks." http://www.dec.ny.gov/outdoor/7872.html

This leads to believe that it is legal in places, but I know certain regions prohibit it, like the High Peaks Region.

8:19 p.m. on December 1, 2011 (EST)
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bccroney, you are right, above tree line in the whites, you can camp. Just be sure that there is plenty of snow, or it is not allowed. Camping on the snow doesn't disturb the foliage and delicate alpine flowers.

12:27 a.m. on December 2, 2011 (EST)
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So what is the deal with barring camping above 3500' in winter.  Is this one of those rules made to protect idiots from themselves?  I hope that idea doesn't spread westward, we already have enough idiot protection rules.

Ed

3:18 a.m. on December 2, 2011 (EST)
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I have no idea where the treeline is in the Sierra. At Yosemite-in my photo here, I'm at 7K give or take a bit and there are trees all over the place. Same at Donner and Tahoe in NorCal.

9:04 a.m. on December 2, 2011 (EST)
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The deal with banning camping above 3500' in winter in alot of the NE comes from the violent and very unpredictable weather. Kinda how Mt. Washington has 'the worst weather in the world'. The mountains out west and the mountains in the NE are two totally different animals.

Yes, it is basically a rule to protect idiots from themselves. They also mandate in the adirondacks that you must have crampons and snowshoes with a snow depth above 8in.

9:36 a.m. on December 2, 2011 (EST)
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Tom D said:

I have no idea where the treeline is in the Sierra.

 It varies.  In the south Sierra you can find trees as high as 11K+, while in the northern Sierra it drops below 9K in places.  In the Bishop/Mammoth/Tuolumne/Twin Lakes area the tree line is between 10.5K - 11K.

Ed

5:16 p.m. on December 2, 2011 (EST)
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Views from the Top is a NE website for those who hike and camp in that part of the country.

Thanks Ed, pretty much what I thought since even at Big Bear or Mt. Baldy,there are trees at higher elevations. I haven't been to Whitney, but from the pictures, no trees near the top.

12:43 p.m. on December 3, 2011 (EST)
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whomeworry said:

So what is the deal with barring camping above 3500' in winter.  Is this one of those rules made to protect idiots from themselves?  I hope that idea doesn't spread westward, we already have enough idiot protection rules.

Ed

Natures railing, just as we cannot have people slipping on the wet slippery rocks of the water fall we most certianly can't have people sliding on the steep incline of the snowy/slippery  mountain.  We all know that some one might just need to be rescued or retrived.  Unless of cource they strap waxed pieces of fiberglass to each foot,  then it's ok.  ;-}>

2:14 a.m. on December 4, 2011 (EST)
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apeman said:

 We all know that some one might just need to be rescued or retrived.  Unless of cource they strap waxed pieces of fiberglass to each foot,  then it's ok.  ;-}>

 Actually it is the $lift ticket$ that makes it ok.

Ed

April 17, 2014
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