When will the snow leave?

1:34 a.m. on February 5, 2007 (EST)
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I am located on the Front Range of CO. When it snows here, it melts in three days. That is great for hiking.

It has been 8 weeks or more since the first snow and has snowed a little or a lot each week since then. What happend to global warming and when is it going to return to CO?

I am itching to get back up into the hills and do some hiking. I am willing to do just day hikes, that is okay.

This week the highs are predicted into the 40s so the low country snow should begin to melt. If the weather holds out I will be hiking around the 6-7 thousand foot level in the next three weeks or so. Normally I like to go much higher for the better hikes, but hey, beggers can't be choosy.

How is it in your area? Anyone eles out hiking?

-John

1:51 a.m. on February 5, 2007 (EST)
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Well, Im going to school in Brookings, SD. The temp has been in the negatives for the past week and is forcasted to be about the same next week. The little snow we did have has now been blown around into crusty snow drifts; not enough to go snowshoeing...sad day. The landscape is flat; decent hiking is at least 6 hours away and some real mountains are at least 10 hours away so that kinda keeps the hiking limited to spring and christmas break and the summer. So my backpacking excitement will consist of planning my summer trip to the tetons for now.


Sorry for sounding like a whiner, but I'm jealous that I can't go hiking whenever I so desire (minus the snow conditions part).

10:47 a.m. on February 5, 2007 (EST)
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" What happend to global warming and when is it going to return to CO?" - well - global warming is exactly that - a global issue - so isolated cold pockets are to be expected (like right now, in PA, we're in the single digits ... not exactly "warm"!) -
We've not had a significant snowfall this year (in fact, last Friday we got our "first snow" - big deal - about .125" - yee ha - just enough to turn regular driviers into idiots ...) - which is odd for this part of the country (the snowfall, not the idiot drivers) - so I've been able to get out and hike on a regular basis - but have yet to get my cross country skis on -
So we're asking "when will the snow arrive!" -

Steve

12:10 p.m. on February 5, 2007 (EST)
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Yeah Steve, or you could be like us in Fairbanks and have snow since October. ...nothing like 6 months of snow!

I'm sorry to rub it on, but I ski 4 times a week. he he he

5:17 p.m. on February 5, 2007 (EST)
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I live in the mountains at the top of California. We are about 59% of our normal precipitation - we have had almost none for weeks. We recently came out of an unusually long colder than normal spell.

Rather than looking for the snow to disappear we need more here.

7:01 p.m. on February 5, 2007 (EST)
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I say bring on the snow, please! We’re way behind here in Maine as well. There’s barely been enough to do much cross-country skiing or snowshoeing, which has been a big disappointment. We got a few more inches this last weekend though, so at least now the ground is covered somewhat decently.

I’m very envious of Dan. We keep joking about moving somewhere farther north. Maybe we’ll have to join Dan in Alaska.

8:55 p.m. on February 6, 2007 (EST)
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Just read that as of Monday we have had no more than an inch of snow in over 5 weeks. That is very, very unusual for us this time of year.

We hopefully will have some coming in the next few days.

11:22 a.m. on February 7, 2007 (EST)
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I wouldn't get too down. Weather goes in cycles regardless of the long-term warming trend. Three years ago, we had about two weeks of solid -40F - -62F temperatures and little snow. The year after was a massive amount of snow and warmer temps. My point being that next year West Virginia to Maine could be leveled in snow and middle America could have a warm winter. Book-mark NOAA for climate information.
http://www.cpc.ncep.noaa.gov/products/predictions/threats/threats.html

2:28 a.m. on February 11, 2007 (EST)
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Well I have to say, it has been warming here a bit. I did see on the news that we are about 89% of normal snow melt with the warmer temps melting it away. Still too much snow for a dry hike in the hills and I think I have had enough winter hiking.

Now the mud hiking is right around the corner.

It is however, suppose to snow for three days next week according to weather.com.

Will have to wait and see.

-John

8:08 p.m. on February 11, 2007 (EST)
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Just got back from 4 days at the Bear Valley Telefest, 3 nights camping - 4 days of blizzard, dumping about 3 feet of heavy wet snow (would have been 6-8 feet if it were the more normal powdery stuff), and it was still snowing when I left to drive home down to 5000 ft and pouring rain as far down as Angels Camp. This should make up for a bit of the lack of snow here in Calif.

This makes a total of 15 days snow camping since Jan 1 for me, including Antarctica, and more coming up in the next couple of months.

4:29 a.m. on February 12, 2007 (EST)
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Bill that sounds pretty exciting to me. I would like to try my hand at some snow camping like that, but do not want to have a go at it alone.

The couple of folks that will hit the high country with me, will not do it in such conditions.

We went camping in Moab last month and after the first night I was stuck in a motel room the next two nights. It only got down to 9F or so. My buddies just would not have it. We were even car camping--bring all the gear you want, and still no go.

I also work many, many, many extra hours in the winter. My goal is to make as much as I can during these months so when spring finally arrives, I can spend most of it out doors.

Much of the snow that hit my area this past month or so is now all but gone.

We do have a weather front scheduled to hit in the morning and stay for a couple of days. Will have to wait and see just how much snow hits.

My dream is to hike to the top of one of the moutains on the Continental Divide to take some photos of snow capped mountians from on top of one. However, I will have to wait until I find an experienced winter hiker to introduce me to this type of an environment.

How was antartica? What took you down there?

-John

6:54 p.m. on February 13, 2007 (EST)
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John -

you can read all about my Antarctic trip in the News section - http://www.trailspace.com/news/2007/02/13/vinson-anniversary-climb.html

Hope you enjoy it!

Thanks to Dave for posting it!

8:13 p.m. on February 21, 2007 (EST)
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John I would suggest that you grab a set of skis or snowshoes cuz i think this snow is going to stay in the mountains for a while last week the mountains got a another foot around here.

Dave
PS. I live in Cheyenne

4:30 a.m. on February 24, 2007 (EST)
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Dave,

I think you are correct. How about in your area, is it there a lot of snow? I was thinking about hiking west of your place. I will have to go back and look at the maps to find the location. I was wondering if there would be less snow in Whyoming vs. Colorado.

Dave I am finally going to have a day off this coming week. I am planning on hiking in Lyons, CO. Halls Ranch. Have you been there? I really like this hike in the spring and late fall. It is flat and only around 5500 to 6000 feet.

Bill, I did not read your wole page, but you have sparked my interest. I wonder if I would enjoy a vist to antartica?

-John

9:00 p.m. on February 24, 2007 (EST)
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John asked "Would I enjoy Antarctica?"

Short answer - YEESSSSS!

I do know people who have said they can't even begin to picture going to the southernmost, most icey continent. You do have to enjoy fantistically beautiful scenery and take appropriate clothing and other gear. And getting the whole thing together is pretty pricey (unless you can wangle some sort of deal or get a job of some sort). There is a huge variety of things to do and see (it is a continent, after all). The coastal areas, especially the Peninsula, has lots of wildlife - penguins (of course), a number of varieties of flying birds, seals of several varieties. The inland areas have fantastic mountains, whether it be the Ellsworths (which include the Sentinel Range where Mt Vinson is) or in Queen Maude Land, or around McMurdo (which is where the active volcanos are). The ski tours are an interesting challenge, if you like that sort of thing - anything from the Last Degree (ski from 89 degrees South Latitude to the Pole at 90 deg S) to skiing from the coast to the Pole to crossing the whole continent. You can do cruises that stop along the coast and Peninsula, with stops ashore to see the animals up close, fly in from Chile, South Africa, or New Zealand (depending on what part of the continent you want to see.

Best thing if you have an interest in science is to hook up with a research project and get your way paid.

Then again, if you would find it hard to tolerate 24 hours a day of sunlight or 24 hours a day of dark (depending on time of year), or don't want to deal with temperatures or -40 and whiteouts where you literally can't see the tips of your skis or dealing with 70 knot winds, well, you probably wouldn't enjoy Antarctica.

9:43 p.m. on February 25, 2007 (EST)
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Bill,

I would love to see the area. I have so little winter experience that I think I would have to practice at home first. 70 knot winds do sound tough to handle. Not sure if I can afford a tent that will hold up in that extreme of an environment.

REI has a tour deal on their web page. I have not looked into it yet.

-John

11:29 a.m. on February 26, 2007 (EST)
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If you sign up with a tour, whether through REI or one of the guide services, they will supply group gear, like tents. Your costs will be for personal gear. The expedition-level down parka, pants, and sleeping bag and double boots will cost a whole bunch more than the tent - individually cost more, I mean.

2:58 a.m. on March 3, 2007 (EST)
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Bill,

I am thinking that about the only way that I will make it out there is if I run into another person as excited about the idea as myself.

On antoher note, I did a hike the other day. Most all the snow was gone. It was great. Nine miles in four hours. Of course it was kind of a flat hike. I had a great time.

My goal is to hike 300 miles this year. I have 291 miles to go.

-John

10:38 p.m. on March 6, 2007 (EST)
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I am on the western slope of Colo. (Glenwood Springs). There are several spots that you can hike around here now, but for the real hikes, you're probably going to have to wait until May. There are some good dayhikes in the Glenwood, Apen, and Snowmass area this time of year. Most of these hikes are 5500-9000 feet elevation. If you are wanting to get away from the snow try going further west to the Grand Junction area. This gives you a great chance to see this area that is far too hot to hike in the summer!

6:26 a.m. on March 10, 2007 (EST)
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Pcloud,

With the rising feul costs I am going to try and stay close to home.

For now I am just doing day hikes.

I went to Poudre canyon the other day. I posted a couple of photos on my web page.

http://www.prelucir.com/grey_rock/grey_rock.htm

In another month or so I am thinking I should be able to get up to 10,000' feet and can camp at the snow line.

Thanks for the advice.

-John

August 1, 2014
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