Backpacks

Whether you’re setting off on an alpine climb, afternoon trail run, or extended thru hike, you need a pack to carry your outdoor gear and essentials while on the go.

Below you'll find our top picks for the best backpacks for hiking, backpacking, climbing, mountaineering, trail running, and more, thanks to hundreds of independent reviews by real hikers, backpackers, alpinists, and other outdoor enthusiasts.

From field-tested ultralight packs to load haulers to kid carriers to hydration packs, our reviewers have shared their real-world experience to help you select an appropriate, dependable backpack for your next outdoor adventure. Find your pack. Pack your gear. Head out.

Learn more about how to choose a backpack below »

Category

Daypacks
Overnight
Weekend
Expedition
External Frame
Winter Packs
Hydration Packs
Front Packs
Lumbar/Hip Packs
Child Carriers
Dry Packs
Portage Packs
Rope Bags
Accessories

Brand

ULA Equipment
CamelBak
Osprey
Deuter
Granite Gear
Patagonia
Equinox
Sea to Summit
SealLine
Mountainsmith

User

Unisex
Men's
Women's
Kids'
Girls'

Price

less than $25
$25 - $49.99
$50 - $99.99
$100 - $199.99
$200 - $299.99
$300 - $399.99
$400 - $499.99
$500 and above

Recent Backpack Reviews

Osprey Airporter Small

rated 5 of 5 stars Protective cover for medium size rucksacks when travelling by air. Packs down to a compact size. Hiking rucksacks tend to have plenty of dangling straps that can get caught in airport luggage conveyor belts, risking damage if they are checked in as hold luggage. The Osprey Airporter is a protective cover that completely encases your rucksack, eliminating this problem. The Airporter is packable, so you can fold it up and keep it in your rucksack till it's time for your flight back home.  The Airporter… Full review

Osprey Ultralight Stuff Pack

rated 5 of 5 stars Super lightweight with Osprey quality and detailed pack. Just bought the Osprey Stuff Pack in my search for a lightweight packable summit/day pack. From a backpacking base camp or thru-hike, I like to leave my tent and HMG large pack and explore. However, I always take essential gear such as first aid kit, water, rain jacket, etc. This is a super light and well designed pack that folds into an inner pouch, has two zipped storage areas, and a small interior pouch with Velcro that is its own storage… Full review

U.S. Military ALICE Pack

rated 1 of 5 stars Primitive, heavy, and outdated, an Alice Pack would never make it into my gear collection. We used these in the NZ Army back in the '80s. Like a lot of the gear back then it was 1960s Vietnam era.Back in those days the gear was so bad that soldiers would go out and buy their own gear, mostly civilian issue.  SAS soldiers used to go out and buy MacPac and Fairydown backpacks. The Alice Packs were just not capable of carrying sufficient load comfortably and I can only suggest they are basically rubbish. Full review

U.S. Military ALICE Pack

rated 4 of 5 stars Not a bad pack as long as you are aware of the strengths and weaknesses of the design. The as-issued ALICE does the job and holds up well to rough use, but it lacks the comfort of more modern designs and the refinements and fashionable trends of civilian products. However, upgrade the straps and the waist belt with MOLLE II replacements and you've got one solid feeling pack that is comfortable and does just about anything you want a pack to do while remaining simple in nature. Consider adding the… Full review

The North Face Rolling Thunder

rated 5 of 5 stars Terrific bag! Sturdy and tough. Nice product!! A great carry-on suitcase for air travel. Slim profile allows easy lifting to overhead bins. Three sturdy handles for lifting into trunk of auto! Wheels are smooth and sturdy. Collapsible handle works with one touch!  Full review

The North Face Snow Leopard Pack

rated 5 of 5 stars That is so funny. I have the same pack. I used it and my Gregory from the mid 1980s. I too loved the Snow Leopard. Mine was also bright blue with yellow straps. I dropped it off at the North Face shop today because the weatherproofing was flaking off on the inside of the pack. I am not sure what they will do. It is a strong comfortable pack with easy access to all parts.It has been all over the mountains of California and southern Arizona with a trip to New Mexico, Colorado, and Kenya. It never… Full review

Outdoor Research Ultralight Compression Sack

rated 4.5 of 5 stars Does the job it was meant to do. I purchased the OR compression sack when I got a new sleeping bag  You can see why. It packs up small and leave it in with the bag 8lt pouch I’ve been using this one about 15x a year for about 10 years and it is showing no signs of wear.  Works very well. I have had cheaper models that seem to bulge at the sides (what’s the point?). That is not the case with the OR. The four straps allow you to evenly cinch down the contents to what my kids call a big jelly… Full review

The North Face Base Camp Duffel

rated 5 of 5 stars My size small base camp duffel is a favorite for short work trips and toting small amounts of extra gear to and from a trailhead. It is built to withstand harsh punishment, easy to carry, and easy to access the interior contents. Cost is the only negative. Available from carry-on size to trek-swallowing massive, the base camp duffel might be the most indestructible and comfortable way to get your stuff from one place to the other. Mine is a size small, and I use it primarily for air travel, national… Full review

JanSport Rainier

rated 5 of 5 stars I, literally, lived out of this pack for four years. It was spacious, had plenty of room for everything I needed. I'm 6'4" and was grateful for the longer frame. When packed right, it was good for the long haul and routinely took me several miles down the road or trail. Having started off with milsurp packs, the Rainier was a dream to own.  Full review

Top-Rated Backpacks

Sort by: name | rating | price | availability | recently reviewed

user rating: 5 of 5 (10)
ULA Equipment Catalyst Expedition Pack
$250
user rating: 5 of 5 (7)
CamelBak Cloud Walker Hydration Pack
$63 - $85
user rating: 5 of 5 (6)
ULA Equipment Ohm 2.0 Weekend Pack
$200
user rating: 5 of 5 (5)
Osprey Talon 11 Daypack
$75 - $100
user rating: 5 of 5 (5)
Deuter Futura 32 Daypack
$112
user rating: 5 of 5 (4)
Granite Gear Round Rock Solid Compression Sack
$25 - $34
user rating: 5 of 5 (4)
Patagonia Atom Daypack
$59 - $79
user rating: 5 of 5 (4)
Equinox Katahdin Weekend Pack
$117
user rating: 5 of 5 (4)
Sea to Summit Ultra-Sil Pack Cover Pack Cover
$25 - $31
user rating: 5 of 5 (4)
Deuter Kid Comfort II Child Carrier
$174 - $249
user rating: 5 of 5 (3)
Deuter Trans Alpine 30 Daypack
$91 - $97
user rating: 5 of 5 (3)
SealLine Pro Portage Pack Dry Pack
$150 - $199
user rating: 5 of 5 (3)
Deuter ACT Trail 24 Daypack
$84 - $119
user rating: 5 of 5 (3)
Osprey Sirrus 24 Daypack
$98 - $130
user rating: 5 of 5 (3)
Mountainsmith Lariat 65 Weekend Pack
$161 - $172
user rating: 5 of 5 (3)
Hyperlite Mountain Gear 3400 Porter Weekend Pack
$345
user rating: 5 of 5 (3)
Ultimate Direction PB Adventure Vest Hydration Pack
$88
user rating: 5 of 5 (2)
Patagonia Black Hole Duffel Pack Duffel
$89 - $169
user rating: 5 of 5 (2)
Osprey UL Raincover Pack Cover
$22 - $40
user rating: 5 of 5 (2)
Granite Gear Nimbus Trace Access 70 Weekend Pack
$175 - $349
user rating: 5 of 5 (2)
Kelty Redwing 32 Daypack
$75 - $99
user rating: 5 of 5 (2)
Hyperlite Mountain Gear 3400 Windrider Weekend Pack
$345
user rating: 5 of 5 (2)
Deuter Futura Pro 34 SL Overnight Pack
$119 - $170
user rating: 5 of 5 (2)
Osprey Xena 85 Expedition Pack
$270 - $380
user rating: 5 of 5 (2)
Fjallraven Kajka 75 Weekend Pack
$400
user rating: 5 of 5 (2)
Mystery Ranch Glacier Weekend Pack
$195 - $349
user rating: 5 of 5 (2)
Gregory Miwok 18 Daypack
$75 - $99
user rating: 5 of 5 (2)
Marmot Kompressor Daypack
$37 - $49
user rating: 5 of 5 (2)
Mystery Ranch Wet Rib Pack Pocket
$40
user rating: 5 of 5 (2)
Arc'teryx Arro 22 Daypack
$199
user rating: 5 of 5 (2)
The North Face Jester Daypack
$38 - $65
user rating: 5 of 5 (2)
Deuter Kid Comfort III Child Carrier
$224
user rating: 5 of 5 (2)
Marmot Ultra Kompressor Daypack
$67 - $88
user rating: 5 of 5 (2)
ALPS Mountaineering Cyclone Stuff Sacks Compression Sack
$13 - $21
user rating: 5 of 5 (2)
Watershed Animas Dry Pack
$120 - $143
user rating: 5 of 5 (2)
Granite Gear Air Zippditty Stuff Sack
$15 - $29
user rating: 5 of 5 (2)
Mountain Hardwear Enterprise Daypack
$72
user rating: 5 of 5 (2)
REI Trail 40 Overnight Pack
$76
user rating: 5 of 5 (2)
Osprey Rev 6 Hydration Pack
$50
user rating: 5 of 5 (2)
Mountainsmith Scream 25 Daypack
$60
user rating: 5 of 5 (2)
The North Face Terra 35 Overnight Pack
$104 - $139
user rating: 5 of 5 (2)
Deuter Pace 36 Winter Pack
$75 - $98
user rating: 5 of 5 (2)
Sea to Summit Ultra-Sil Dry Sacks Dry Bag
$9 - $26
user rating: 5 of 5 (2)
Osprey Raptor 10 Hydration Pack
$97
user rating: 5 of 5 (2)
Osprey Stratos 34 Overnight Pack
$120 - $160
user rating: 5 of 5 (2)
Osprey Aura AG 50 Weekend Pack
$172 - $240
user rating: 5 of 5 (2)
Pelican 1040 Micro Case Waterproof Hard Case
$18
user rating: 5 of 5 (1)
NRS Ricksack Dry Bag Dry Bag
$28
user rating: 5 of 5 (1)
CamelBak Magic Hydration Pack
$55 - $80
user rating: 5 of 5 (1)
Hyperlite Mountain Gear 2400 Southwest Overnight Pack
$310
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How to Choose a Backpack

Like most outdoor gear, choosing the right backpack depends on how you plan to use it and selecting one that fits you, your needs, your budget, and your gear.

Capacity (or How Big?)

Consider the following questions to help determine capacity, or how big of a pack you really need.

  • How long are you heading out for: a day, an overnight, a week?
  • What's your outdoor style? Are you a minimalist, or deeply attached to creature comforts, or somewhere in between?
  • How much and what gear will you bring for specific trips and activities? Don't forget group gear and seasonal items (for example: winter gear will take up more room).

Pack Sizes

Obviously you need a backpack that fits all your gear. If possible, lay it all out, including food and water, and be honest about what you'll need to fit in your pack.

Backpack sizing varies between individuals and manufacturers, but the following ranges are a basic starting point:

  • Day Pack:
    less than 2,000 cubic inches
    up to 30 liters
  • Overnight:
    2,000 - 2,999 cubic inches
    30-50 liters
  • Weekend and Multi-Day:
    3,000 - 4,499 cubic inches
    50-73 liters
  • Week-Long and Expedition:
    4,500+ cubic inches
    74 liters and up

Pack Tip: Don't buy a backpack bigger than you need. You'll be tempted to fill it and carry more than necessary, or you'll end up with an annoying floppy, half-filled pack.

Fit (Is It Comfy?)

Nothing beats the expertise of a knowledgeable pack fitter. Find one at your local outdoor retailer. In the meantime, here are some additional tips to help you choose a backpack that fits you well.

Torso Length

Size a backpack to your torso length. Don't assume you need the tall (or the regular or the short) model based on your height. The sizes of different manufacturers' frames may correspond to different torso lengths. Check each pack's technical specifications.

To find your torso length, have someone measure from the iliac crest at the top of your hipbone to the prominent bone at the base of your neck (the seventh cervical vertebrae). (See how to properly fit a backpack in this instructional video.)

Pack Gender

Many pack manufacturers produce women-specific or short torso versions. Women, kids, and others with short torsos can consider backpacks sized for them. On average, these fit the average woman better.

Pack Tip: Don't get stuck on a pack's gender though. Buy the one that fits you best.

Straps and Padding

Shoulder straps, which control the fit of the suspension system, should be well padded and adjustable.

An adjustable sternum strap, which connects the shoulder straps, helps bring the load weight forward and off your shoulders.

Since it supports your pack's weight, make sure the hipbelt provides adequate padding. Some pack makers offer interchangeable hipbelts in different styles and in sizes for both men and women for a better individual fit.

Load

Fitting your gear in the pack is one thing. Making sure it rides comfortably is another. What's the typical weight of your gear? Check that it matches the manufacturer's recommendation, particularly if you're opting for an ultralight pack.

During a fitting, load the pack with weight to see how well it carries. Walk around with the loaded pack, practice taking it on and off, move around, and climb up and down stairs and slopes.

How well is the pack's load distributed? Does it remain comfortable over its carrying capacity and intended uses? Does it feel stable?

 

Features & Organization

Consider the pack's organization. Is equipment stowed securely? Is it easy to access? Intuitive?

If you'll be carrying any specialty gear, such as ice axes, snowshoes, skis, or a snowboard, look for a pack with features or accessories designed to hold those items, rather than trying to jury-rig them on later.

Depending on your different activities you may need more than one backpack, perhaps a large internal frame pack for multi-day backpacking trips and a small daypack for day hikes.

Find the best pack for you and your activities and you'll be ready to hit the trail.