Tents and Shelters

Ready for a night out? Whether you’re an ultralight alpinist, family of backpackers, devoted hanger, or comfort camper, you'll find the best tents, tarps, and hammocks for your outdoor overnights right here.

Check out our top picks below—including price comparisons—to shelter you in any terrain, trip, or season: winter mountaineering, three-season thru-hiking, warm weather car camping, hammock hanging, alpine bivys, tarps, and emergency shelter.

Or you can browse our thousands of independent tent and shelter ratings and reviews by product type, brand, or price. Written by real-world hikers, backpackers, alpinists, climbers, and paddlers, Trailspace community reviews will help you select a dependable, field-tested, outdoor abode just right for your next adventure.

Learn more about how to choose a tent/shelter below »

Categories

Four-Season
3-4 Season Convertible
Three-Season
Warm Weather
Bivy Sacks
Tarps and Shelters
Hammocks
Accessories

Brands

Eagles Nest Outfitters
NEMO
Terra Nova
Hilleberg
MSR
Marmot
L.L.Bean
Black Diamond
EMS
Sierra Designs

Genders

Unisex
Kids'

Price

less than $25
$25 - $49.99
$50 - $99.99
$100 - $199.99
$200 - $299.99
$300 - $399.99
$400 - $499.99
$500 and above

Recent Tent/Shelter Reviews

Terra Nova Voyager

rated 0.5 of 5 stars I have had this tent the Terra Nova Voyager for just under a year now, mostly taken out in fair weather. I decided to camp on top of Pen-y-fan 11/04/15. The wind conditions were moderate to strong at the time, but with this being rated a 4-season tent I was confident it would withstand the weather being thrown at it, but boy was I wrong. The arch pole over the door kept being blown back onto the tent and me inside all night. Despite being pitched correctly the result in the morning was a broken… Full review

Northwest Territory Olympic Cottage Deluxe Cabin Tent

rated 3 of 5 stars We have used ours for three camping trips, good space, love the closet features and the partition. I had to color code the instruction label in order to remember how to do it each time. On the 3rd trip the hubby didn't pay attention to taking it down properly (taking down wall poles first) then setting the ceiling framing on ground to separate. He snapped the steeple hub ( if I remember correctly). Turns out there is no place to get replacement parts! Full review

Sierra Designs Night Watch CD

rated 5 of 5 stars My favorite 4-season tent. At 7 lbs, it's several pounds lighter than my Trango 2. It keeps me dry and comfortable in sub zero. The tent is comfortable in seasons other than winter because of its clever venting. : Easy 3 pole setup.  Stability: Tent is very taut when guyed out. Camped in -20°F with 20-30 mph winds. I tied the fly to some logs and shrubs and staked it out best I could in frozen ground. No flapping. No problems.Weather Resistance: I've always stayed dry and the tent is 14 years… Full review

Sierra Designs Yahi 4

rated 5 of 5 stars A fantastic, well thought out and well engineered tent. Setup: Really easy. Footprint clips onto tent through patented Jake's feet clips. Poles insert and fit great. Stability: Does very well in non-extreme weather. I've used it in 4 seasons and it has been great.  Weather resistance: Fly hangs really low keeping all weather out.  Ventilation: Does pretty well. Has minimal condensation. Room and storage: Has 4 double compartment personal pockets and 2 wall mesh pockets. Packability:  Has a handled… Full review

Mountain Hardwear Trango 2

rated 4.5 of 5 stars Excellent winter tent. Waterproof, bombproof, roomy, lots of pockets, big vestibules, heavy. The Trango 2 is a very durable and reliable tent. If I know I'm going to be in for nasty weather, I bring this titan. It stays warm inside. It vents pretty well. You can cook in the vestibule. On really cold nights when your body is flushing out excess fluid, you can actually urinate in the vestibule and exit on the other side in the morning. Sounds gross but the alternative at -30° is even worse. I've… Full review

ALPS Mountaineering Zenith 2 AL Tent

rated 4 of 5 stars Excellent value...quality materials, good design In the midst of making future plans to Thru-Hike the AT I figured I needed a newer, lighter weight 2-man backpacking tent (have a North Face Westwind bought in 1982). I'm not crazy weight conscious so a few extra pounds are fine for added comfort.  Saw this tent on Sierra Trading Post, seemed the right size and style, and with a coupon it was the deal of the century ($84 and free shipping). Set it up in my living room...determined it would take a… Full review

Sierra Designs Sirius 2

rated 4.5 of 5 stars Great summer tent. I thought the tent would get wet from splash back in heavy rain. I stayed in the tent twice in really heavy rains and have stayed completely dry.  It's a one pole design which makes it super easy to set up. The criss cross design radiates out from a small central hub that clips to the top of the tent.  At first I couldn't figure out what the big yellow velcro straps were on the bottom side of the fly. I found out it's so you can roll your fly back like a sardine lid and velcro… Full review

The North Face Foundation 6

rated 3 of 5 stars It's an OK tent, but it lacks some physics research. Overall the tent is fine, but it is not really industrial strength. The materials are lightweight and the zippers are small gauge.  Since this is a family size tent there are a couple of things to be aware of: Because the materials are thin and lightweight, it may be more prone to punctures.  The tent pole sleeves require you to bend the poles a great deal to pass them through; this caused a tear in the sleeve because of the extreme pressure… Full review

Raven Designs Gear Asgard A2

rated 4.5 of 5 stars Lightweight, highly focused for weather, safety, and weight, tough little tent. Few frills, lots of design features. Very versatile. This review has been a long time coming. I bought this tent after coming upon it on the web while searching for military tents. After speaking with the owner a bit via email, I selected the two-person Asgard A2 tent. The tents are primarily targeted for the military and mountain climbing community. This generally means lightweight, strong, waterproof, windproof and… Full review

Top-Rated Tents and Shelters

Sort by: name | rating | price | availability | recently reviewed

user rating: 5 of 5 (106)
Eagles Nest Outfitters DoubleNest Hammock
$56 - $89
user rating: 5 of 5 (15)
Eagles Nest Outfitters Atlas Hammock Suspension System Hammock Accessory
$29
user rating: 5 of 5 (11)
NEMO Morpho AR Three-Season Tent
$390
user rating: 5 of 5 (10)
Terra Nova Ultra Quasar Four-Season Tent
$780
user rating: 5 of 5 (9)
Hilleberg Nallo 2 Four-Season Tent
$715
user rating: 5 of 5 (6)
Terra Nova Super Quasar Four-Season Tent
$880
user rating: 5 of 5 (6)
Eagles Nest Outfitters ProFly Rain Tarp Tarp/Shelter
$80 - $99
user rating: 5 of 5 (6)
Hilleberg Soulo Four-Season Tent
$665
user rating: 5 of 5 (6)
NEMO Losi 2P Three-Season Tent
$320 - $389
user rating: 5 of 5 (5)
MSR E-Wing Tarp/Shelter
$100 - $174
user rating: 5 of 5 (5)
Marmot Limelight 4P Three-Season Tent
$295 - $369
user rating: 5 of 5 (4)
Hilleberg Nammatj 3 GT Four-Season Tent
$925
user rating: 5 of 5 (4)
L.L.Bean Microlight 2 Three-Season Tent
$239
user rating: 5 of 5 (3)
Black Diamond Mega Light Tarp/Shelter
$229 - $289
user rating: 5 of 5 (3)
Hilleberg Kaitum 2 Four-Season Tent
$865 - $995
user rating: 5 of 5 (3)
Hilleberg Nallo 3 GT Four-Season Tent
$865
user rating: 5 of 5 (2)
EMS Velocity 1 Tent Three-Season Tent
$215
user rating: 5 of 5 (2)
MSR Elixir 3 Three-Season Tent
$300
user rating: 5 of 5 (2)
Sierra Designs Lightning 2 UL Three-Season Tent
$270
user rating: 5 of 5 (2)
The North Face 2-Meter Dome Four-Season Tent
$4,996 - $5,500
user rating: 5 of 5 (2)
Granite Gear White Lightnin' Tarp/Shelter
$150 - $184
user rating: 5 of 5 (2)
Marmot Haven 2P Three-Season Tent
$400
user rating: 5 of 5 (2)
Grand Trunk Funky Forest Tarp Tarp/Shelter
$80
user rating: 5 of 5 (2)
Byer Easy Traveller Hammock
$40 - $46
user rating: 5 of 5 (2)
Big Agnes Tensleep Station 6 Three-Season Tent
$450 - $469
user rating: 5 of 5 (2)
Eagles Nest Outfitters JungleNest Hammock Hammock
$99
user rating: 5 of 5 (2)
Big Agnes Copper Spur UL4 Three-Season Tent
$504 - $629
user rating: 5 of 5 (2)
Kelty Triptease Lightline Tent Accessory
$15 - $19
user rating: 5 of 5 (2)
Nite Ize Figure 9 Carabiner Tent Accessory
$2 - $10
user rating: 5 of 5 (2)
Eagles Nest Outfitters OneLink SingleNest Hammock
$210
user rating: 5 of 5 (2)
Hilleberg Unna Four-Season Tent
$620
user rating: 5 of 5 (2)
Eureka! Grand Manan Tour
$335
user rating: 5 of 5 (2)
Eagles Nest Outfitters Double Deluxe Hammock
$85
user rating: 5 of 5 (2)
Grand Trunk Double Parachute Nylon Hammock Hammock
$65 - $74
user rating: 5 of 5 (2)
Eagles Nest Outfitters OneLink DoubleNest Hammock
$220 - $234
user rating: 5 of 5 (1)
Marmot Thor 3P Four-Season Tent
$527 - $659
user rating: 5 of 5 (1)
REI Quarter Dome T2 Plus Three-Season Tent
$239 - $249
user rating: 5 of 5 (1)
Mountain Hardwear Stronghold Four-Season Tent
$3,500
user rating: 5 of 5 (1)
The North Face Mica FL 2 Three-Season Tent
$279 - $379
user rating: 5 of 5 (1)
L.L.Bean Mountain Light XT 3-Person Tent Three-Season Tent
$259
user rating: 5 of 5 (1)
Kelty Noah's Tarp 16 Tarp/Shelter
$100
user rating: 5 of 5 (1)
Hilleberg Snow and Sand Peg Stake
$70
user rating: 5 of 5 (1)
Sierra Designs Convert 3 Four-Season Tent
$490 - $689
user rating: 5 of 5 (1)
MSR Twin Sisters Tarp/Shelter
$300
user rating: 5 of 5 (1)
ALPS Mountaineering Meramac 6 Three-Season Tent
$153
user rating: 5 of 5 (1)
Hennessy Hammock Hyperlite Asym Zip Hammock
$280
user rating: 5 of 5 (1)
REI Passage 2 Tent Three-Season Tent
$159
user rating: 5 of 5 (1)
MSR Zing Tarp/Shelter
$400
user rating: 5 of 5 (1)
Eagles Nest Outfitters Reactor Hammock Hammock
$86 - $94
user rating: 5 of 5 (1)
Black Diamond Eldorado Four-Season Tent
$460 - $699
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What’s the “best” tent or shelter for you? Consider your personal outdoor needs, preferences, and budget:

  • Conditions:
    First, and most important, in what seasons, conditions, and terrain will you use your tent, tarp, or hammock? Choose a shelter that can handle the conditions you expect to encounter (rain, snow, wind, heat, humidity, biting insects, an energetic scout troop), but don’t buy more tent than you truly need, and don’t expect one tent to do it all.
  • Capacity:
    Tents are typically classified by sleeping capacity (i.e. one-person, two-person, etc). However, a tent's stated sleeping capacity usually does not include much (or any) space for your gear and there’s no sizing standard between tent manufacturers. Some users size up.
  • Livability:
    Will you use the tent as a basecamp or is it an emergency shelter only? To determine if you and your gear will fit, look at the shelter’s dimensions, including floor and vestibule square areas, height and headroom (including at the sides), plus the number and placement of doors, gear lofts, and pockets, to assess personal livability, comfort, and footprint.
  • Weight and Packed Size:
    If you’ll be backpacking, climbing, cycling, or otherwise carrying that shelter, consider its weight, packed size (and your pack it needs to fit in), and its space-to-weight ratio before automatically opting for the bigger tent. Paddlers and car campers have more room to work with, but everyone should consider how the tent and its parts pack up for stowage.
  • Design:
    Tents come in various designs. Freestanding tents can stand alone without stakes or guy lines and can be easily moved or have dirt and other debris shaken out without being disassembled, though they still need to be staked out. Rounded, geodesic domes are stable and able to withstand heavy snow loads and wind. Tunnel tents are narrow and rectangular, and large family cabin tents are best for warm-weather campground outings.
  • Other features and specs to consider include single versus double-wall, ease of setup, stability, weather resistance, ventilation, , and any noteworthy features.
  • Read more in our guide to tents.