Tents and Shelters

Ready for a night out? Whether you’re an ultralight alpinist, family of backpackers, devoted hanger, or comfort camper, you'll find the best tents, tarps, and hammocks for your outdoor overnights right here.

Check out our top picks below—including price comparisons—to shelter you in any terrain, trip, or season: winter mountaineering, three-season thru-hiking, warm weather car camping, hammock hanging, alpine bivys, tarps, and emergency shelter.

Or you can browse our thousands of independent tent and shelter ratings and reviews by product type, brand, or price. Written by real-world hikers, backpackers, alpinists, climbers, and paddlers, Trailspace community reviews will help you select a dependable, field-tested, outdoor abode just right for your next adventure.

Learn more about how to choose a tent/shelter below »

Category

Four-Season
3-4 Season Convertible
Three-Season
Warm Weather
Bivy Sacks
Tarps and Shelters
Hammocks
Bug Nets
Accessories

Brands

Eagles Nest Outfitters
Hilleberg
MSR
Marmot
Grand Trunk
Sierra Designs
EMS
Black Diamond
Kodiak Canvas
Hyperlite Mountain Gear

User

Unisex
Kids'

Price

less than $25
$25 - $49.99
$50 - $99.99
$100 - $199.99
$200 - $299.99
$300 - $399.99
$400 - $499.99
$500 and above

Recent Tent/Shelter Reviews

Mountain Hardwear Space Station

rated 5 of 5 stars We set up two of these jar 18000 feet on k2 as a base camp. Very sturdy. Put in all the stakes. Add ropes. For a geodesic dome, it was very light. The cost is the metal and extreme fabric. No rips after sustained 40 mph wind. Difficult to heat for sleep. Expensive, but omly game in town Full review

Tarptent Notch

rated 2 of 5 stars Fly doesn't come close to ground, problem in wind and rain i bought notch to be a better rain shelter than a flat tarp and because there is a bug tent that fits under it perfectly. But, the fly can't be staked low enough to the ground to use with a little rain and wind. I believe i could modify the fly by removing the 4 stiffeners at the ends and adding 4 stake loops mid panel. I noticed that one of the tents by BearPaw is of similar design but can be staked all the way to the ground if desired. … Full review

Bibler Tempest

rated 1.5 of 5 stars While this is a truly bomber tent, and all the other reviews nail it, the A-shaped end poles are prone to breakage. A few years back, a tent mate failed to heed my warning to "let me set this up" and snapped the shorter A-shaped end pole because he bent/bowed it from too close to the apex. Black Diamond, bless their souls, repaired it.  Last week, I set it up at home. Since the first break, I've been extremely careful about tensioning the shorter end pole - I've set this up many many times, and… Full review

Dutchware 11 Foot Netless Hammock

rated 5 of 5 stars My bed of choice. My 11' hammock is made of "Hexon 1.6W".  I didn't buy the hammock from Dutch, but I did buy my material from him to make my own 11' netless hammock for about $30.   The material is incredibly durrable, and comfortable.  I had a $30 ENO-type hammock before this, and the hexon 1.6 packs down much smaller, weighs much less, and is more comfortable.  My friends with ENO's have said that they're jealous of my size/weight/price ratio when compared to their's.      If you plan… Full review

Kelty Noah's Tarp 9

rated 5 of 5 stars She's an amazing beast.      I've had mine for a couple years now, and regularly use it in wind, rain and snow.      The best thing I can probably say about this product is the time that it saved my hammock, down sleeping bag, and down underquilt from a flash flood.  When the flowing water and debris pulled out my tent stakes, the tarp wrapped around everything and kept it all litteraly bone dry in the flowing creek water throughout the remainder of the storm.  It was truely incredible. … Full review

Hennessy Hammock Ultralight Backpacker Asym

rated 4.5 of 5 stars UPDATE TO 2004 REVIEW: Nicely researched and developed products. They are comfortable and dependable. This is an updated review from many years ago. As I could not find my information from back then, I made a new profile. As I'm such a major fan of hammock camping, I thought I would submit another review and mention some additional points. When Tom was just starting out making hammocks, he and I had the pleasure of talking several times over the years. I was very impressed by his dedication to quality… Full review

Eureka! Solitaire

rated 3.5 of 5 stars I have one with aluminum poles. My tent came with aluminum poles and they have held up well. I don't know if this is a change to try to fix the pole breakage problems or if that's just what Eureka chose to sell in Canada, but it's lighter and stronger and seems to do the job. Full review

Moss Tents Hooped Outland

rated 5 of 5 stars I have the Hooped Outland version. The vestibule has a separate pole and is great. It is tight to get in/out of for me (6'2") but it is bomb proof and long enough that my bag does not press against the tent walls. I got the tent down to 5 lb 10 oz lbs with Ti stakes and no ground cloth. Great for high altitude backpacking. I have the Hooped Outland version. The vestibule has a separate pole and is great. It is tight to get in/out of for me (6'2"), but it is bomb proof and long enough that my sleeping… Full review

The North Face Meso 2

rated 2.5 of 5 stars I bought this tent for cycling and hiking trips. Used it four times and it is coming apart. The mechanism on the flying sheet, to attach it to tent, just falls off. Setup: Easy simple and quick Stability: Not stable in wind Weather Resistance: Have not used it in the rain. But did not have moisture problems the four times I used it. Ventilation: Good Room and Storage: Considering its light weight and reason I purchased it is small but perfect. Packability: Good Ease of Use: Easy  Features: Flying… Full review

Top-Rated Tents and Shelters

Sort by: name | rating | price | availability | recently reviewed

user rating: 5 of 5 (108)
Eagles Nest Outfitters DoubleNest Hammock
$70 - $89
user rating: 5 of 5 (15)
Eagles Nest Outfitters Atlas Straps Hammock Accessory
$30 - $39
user rating: 5 of 5 (10)
Hilleberg Nallo 2 Four-Season Tent
$735
user rating: 5 of 5 (7)
Hilleberg Soulo Four-Season Tent
$685
user rating: 5 of 5 (7)
MSR E-Wing Tarp/Shelter
$100
user rating: 5 of 5 (6)
Hilleberg Nammatj 3 GT Four-Season Tent
$979 - $989
user rating: 5 of 5 (6)
Eagles Nest Outfitters ProFly Rain Tarp Tarp/Shelter
$80 - $99
user rating: 5 of 5 (5)
Marmot Limelight 4P Three-Season Tent
$332 - $379
user rating: 5 of 5 (5)
Grand Trunk Double Parachute Nylon Hammock Hammock
$65 - $99
user rating: 5 of 5 (4)
Sierra Designs Lightning 2 FL Three-Season Tent
$285 - $379
user rating: 5 of 5 (3)
EMS Velocity 1 Tent Three-Season Tent
$188
user rating: 5 of 5 (3)
Black Diamond Mega Light Tarp/Shelter
$290
user rating: 5 of 5 (3)
Kodiak Canvas 10x10 Flex-Bow Canvas Tent Deluxe Four-Season Tent
$550
user rating: 5 of 5 (3)
Hilleberg Kaitum 2 Four-Season Tent
$885 - $895
user rating: 5 of 5 (3)
Hilleberg Nallo 3 GT Four-Season Tent
$885
user rating: 5 of 5 (2)
Hyperlite Mountain Gear Flat Tarp Tarp/Shelter
$300 - $310
user rating: 5 of 5 (2)
MSR Elixir 3 Three-Season Tent
$300
user rating: 5 of 5 (2)
REI Dash 2 Tent Three-Season Tent
$200
user rating: 5 of 5 (2)
Kelty Noah's Tarp 16 Tarp/Shelter
$100
user rating: 5 of 5 (2)
Napier Sportz SUV Tent Warm Weather Tent
$340 - $369
user rating: 5 of 5 (2)
ALPS Mountaineering Orion 4 Three-Season Tent
$119
user rating: 5 of 5 (2)
Eureka! Taron 2 Three-Season Tent
$180
user rating: 5 of 5 (2)
Eagles Nest Outfitters HouseFly Rain Tarp Tarp/Shelter
$140
user rating: 5 of 5 (2)
Exped Gemini 2 Three-Season Tent
$349
user rating: 5 of 5 (2)
Grand Trunk Funky Forest Tarp Tarp/Shelter
$80
user rating: 5 of 5 (2)
Kammok Roo Hammock
$70 - $99
user rating: 5 of 5 (2)
Byer Easy Traveller Hammock
$25 - $39
user rating: 5 of 5 (2)
Cabela's XPG Expedition 4P Four-Season Tent
$400
user rating: 5 of 5 (2)
Kelty Triptease Lightline Tent Accessory
$14 - $19
user rating: 5 of 5 (2)
Nite Ize Figure 9 Carabiner Tent Accessory
$2 - $10
user rating: 5 of 5 (2)
Eagles Nest Outfitters OneLink SingleNest Hammock
$210 - $219
user rating: 5 of 5 (2)
Eagles Nest Outfitters Double Deluxe Hammock
$64 - $84
user rating: 5 of 5 (2)
Hilleberg Nammatj 3 Four-Season Tent
$795 - $989
user rating: 5 of 5 (2)
Hilleberg Saivo Four-Season Tent
$1,345 - $1,365
user rating: 5 of 5 (2)
Eagles Nest Outfitters JungleNest Hammock
$100
user rating: 5 of 5 (2)
Eagles Nest Outfitters OneLink DoubleNest Hammock
$220
user rating: 5 of 5 (1)
Ferrino Snowbound 3 Four-Season Tent
$250
user rating: 5 of 5 (1)
Eagles Nest Outfitters Reactor Hammock
$95
user rating: 5 of 5 (1)
Hilleberg Enan Three-Season Tent
$585 - $635
user rating: 5 of 5 (1)
Mountain Hardwear Stronghold Four-Season Tent
$3,750
user rating: 5 of 5 (1)
The North Face Mica FL 2 Three-Season Tent
$279 - $379
user rating: 5 of 5 (1)
L.L.Bean Mountain Light XT 3-Person Tent Three-Season Tent
$269
user rating: 5 of 5 (1)
REI Quarter Dome 1 Three-Season Tent
$170 - $279
user rating: 5 of 5 (1)
Big Agnes Rattlesnake SL1 mtnGLO Three-Season Tent
$225 - $299
user rating: 5 of 5 (1)
Eagles Nest Outfitters Sub7 Hammock
$50 - $69
user rating: 5 of 5 (1)
Sierra Designs Convert 3 Four-Season Tent
$690
user rating: 5 of 5 (1)
MSR Twin Sisters Tarp/Shelter
$185 - $399
user rating: 5 of 5 (1)
Hennessy Hammock Hyperlite Asym Zip Hammock
$280
user rating: 5 of 5 (1)
Coghlan's Tarp Clips Tent Accessory
$3
user rating: 5 of 5 (1)
MSR Zing Tarp/Shelter
$300
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What’s the “best” tent or shelter for you? Consider your personal outdoor needs, preferences, and budget:

  • Conditions:
    First, and most important, in what seasons, conditions, and terrain will you use your tent, tarp, or hammock? Choose a shelter that can handle the conditions you expect to encounter (rain, snow, wind, heat, humidity, biting insects, an energetic scout troop), but don’t buy more tent than you truly need, and don’t expect one tent to do it all.
  • Capacity:
    Tents are typically classified by sleeping capacity (i.e. one-person, two-person, etc). However, a tent's stated sleeping capacity usually does not include much (or any) space for your gear and there’s no sizing standard between tent manufacturers. Some users size up.
  • Livability:
    Will you use the tent as a basecamp or is it an emergency shelter only? To determine if you and your gear will fit, look at the shelter’s dimensions, including floor and vestibule square areas, height and headroom (including at the sides), plus the number and placement of doors, gear lofts, and pockets, to assess personal livability, comfort, and footprint.
  • Weight and Packed Size:
    If you’ll be backpacking, climbing, cycling, or otherwise carrying that shelter, consider its weight, packed size (and your pack it needs to fit in), and its space-to-weight ratio before automatically opting for the bigger tent. Paddlers and car campers have more room to work with, but everyone should consider how the tent and its parts pack up for stowage.
  • Design:
    Tents come in various designs. Freestanding tents can stand alone without stakes or guy lines and can be easily moved or have dirt and other debris shaken out without being disassembled, though they still need to be staked out. Rounded, geodesic domes are stable and able to withstand heavy snow loads and wind. Tunnel tents are narrow and rectangular, and large family cabin tents are best for warm-weather campground outings.
  • Other features and specs to consider include single versus double-wall, ease of setup, stability, weather resistance, ventilation, , and any noteworthy features.
  • Read more in our guide to tents.