Tents and Shelters

Ready for a night out? Whether you’re an ultralight alpinist, family of backpackers, devoted hanger, or comfort camper, you'll find the best tents, tarps, and hammocks for your outdoor overnights right here.

Check out our top picks below—including price comparisons—to shelter you in any terrain, trip, or season: winter mountaineering, three-season thru-hiking, warm weather car camping, hammock hanging, alpine bivys, tarps, and emergency shelter.

Or you can browse our thousands of independent tent and shelter ratings and reviews by product type, brand, or price. Written by real-world hikers, backpackers, alpinists, climbers, and paddlers, Trailspace community reviews will help you select a dependable, field-tested, outdoor abode just right for your next adventure.

Learn more about how to choose a tent/shelter below »

Categories

Four-Season
3-4 Season Convertible
Three-Season
Warm Weather
Bivy Sacks
Tarps and Shelters
Hammocks
Accessories

Brands

Eagles Nest Outfitters
NEMO
Terra Nova
Hilleberg
MSR
Marmot
L.L.Bean
Black Diamond
Grand Trunk
ALPS Mountaineering

Genders

Unisex
Men's
Kids'

Price

less than $25
$25 - $49.99
$50 - $99.99
$100 - $199.99
$200 - $299.99
$300 - $399.99
$400 - $499.99
$500 and above

Recent Tent/Shelter Reviews

Black Diamond Skylight

rated 0.5 of 5 stars Retiring it after three years. Can't keep out rain. Leaks like a sieve in steady rain. Condensation builds up in bad weather when you close the vestibule even with recommended venting. Lightweight, but don't trust it in inclement weather. I have used this tent for three years. Purchased from BD in 2013. Also have an Eldorado and Fitzroy. Those are keepers. The Skylight is unreliable. It will not handle anything but balmy weather. It will not keep out a steady rain. Finally had to put a tarp over… Full review

Marmot Traillight 2P

rated 4 of 5 stars A decent solo tent for the summer sub-alpine. I bought this as a solo summer mountain tent and am happy with what I have. It is perfect for one person. If two men are sharing this tent then they are probably sharing more than a tent. I have not had it in any summer snow conditions (YET), but if you're able to tie it down it should handle a couple of inches, which makes the 5 lb total travel weight reasonable.  I've had it for a few years on 6 or 7 backcountry trips. Everything has held up well. Full review

REI Hobitat 4

rated 5 of 5 stars A tent big enough to stand in, or lounge inside with several friends during stormy weather. Great for most types of weather, even light snow. Great all around, car camping tent. Full review

Big Agnes Rattlesnake SL1 mtnGLO

rated 5 of 5 stars Light and spacious for a 1P tent. I've been searching for a 1P tent that balances space with weight. This is the one. Fairly taut tent without guys Side entry facilitates the ol' in and out. Setup: Really easy setup. There's a solo collapsible pole system and one cross pole for the top. Just insert the poles into the 4 corners, clip the tent to the poles, and fasten the top cross pole, Done. No sleeves, no problem. The fly has 4 corner clips that make it very simple. Additionally, the fly fastens… Full review

REI Half Dome 2

rated 2.5 of 5 stars Good in fair weather only. ANY amount of rain consistently ends up coming in through the vents even velcroed shut. Heavy rain bounces into the tent from under the flaps. After many soaked nights, I have begun adding modifications since I live in Australia and can't really exchange it—fingers crossed on the mods. This tent is great in dry weather. We have used it in all sorts of terrain—hard earth, soft earth, duff, grass, river cobbles (with protective blanket under, that was car camping), etc. Full review

Big Agnes Fly Creek UL1

rated 4.5 of 5 stars In my estimation this tent has all four major attributes necessary in a one-man, three-season tent. Ease of setup, ease to dismantle, durability, and weight. One downfall is there is a minimum of headroom for taller folks, I'm 5'9" and it just accommodates me. I've camped in mine through rain and wind storms and stayed protected and dry. i've used this tent in the Arizona desert and the woods of the Boundary Waters in upper Minnesota and it delivers time after time. I usually use it staked down… Full review

Sierra Designs Comet

rated 4.5 of 5 stars Fast setup, good fly. Full review

Kelty Salida 2

rated 4.5 of 5 stars This product is great as far as airflow, weight, and price point. Larger vestibules area similar to the Sierra Design Flash Lightning and the like would be awesome, but you sacrifice weight for convenient storage. But for a smaller size weight 2-man tent this is a great buy if you can get your hands on one. I took this pack for five days out on the PCT last year in February and it performed flawlessly. I had no issues with condensation even though it got quite cold and stayed quite damp. I do use… Full review

Macpac Olympus

rated 5 of 5 stars Legendary mountain tent for Australia / New Zealand. I have been camping, hiking, XC skiing, and mountaineering for 40 (+) years and have owned many (many) tents. Winter experience covers most of the Australian alps, Antarctica, NZ, Patagonia, and a very cold German winter. This is the only 4-season tent I have ever owned, and I suspect that it will last me the next 20 years.  The Macpac Olympus is a very popular / highly regarded tent, particularly in Australia / NZ. Macpac was originally a NZ… Full review

Top-Rated Tents and Shelters

Sort by: name | rating | price | availability | recently reviewed

user rating: 5 of 5 (107)
Eagles Nest Outfitters DoubleNest Hammock
$65 - $69
user rating: 5 of 5 (15)
Eagles Nest Outfitters Atlas Hammock Suspension System Hammock Accessory
$30 - $39
user rating: 5 of 5 (11)
NEMO Morpho AR Three-Season Tent
$390
user rating: 5 of 5 (10)
Terra Nova Ultra Quasar Four-Season Tent
$780
user rating: 5 of 5 (9)
Hilleberg Nallo 2 Four-Season Tent
$735
user rating: 5 of 5 (6)
Terra Nova Super Quasar Four-Season Tent
$880
user rating: 5 of 5 (6)
Eagles Nest Outfitters ProFly Rain Tarp Tarp/Shelter
$80 - $119
user rating: 5 of 5 (6)
Hilleberg Soulo Four-Season Tent
$685
user rating: 5 of 5 (6)
MSR E-Wing Tarp/Shelter
$131 - $174
user rating: 5 of 5 (5)
Marmot Limelight 4P Three-Season Tent
$339 - $368
user rating: 5 of 5 (4)
Hilleberg Nammatj 3 GT Four-Season Tent
$979
user rating: 5 of 5 (4)
L.L.Bean Microlight 2 Three-Season Tent
$229
user rating: 5 of 5 (3)
Black Diamond Mega Light Tarp/Shelter
$290
user rating: 5 of 5 (3)
Hilleberg Kaitum 2 Four-Season Tent
$865 - $1,020
user rating: 5 of 5 (3)
Hilleberg Nallo 3 GT Four-Season Tent
$885
user rating: 5 of 5 (3)
Grand Trunk Double Parachute Nylon Hammock Hammock
$49 - $74
user rating: 5 of 5 (3)
ALPS Mountaineering Lynx 2 AL Three-Season Tent
$140
user rating: 5 of 5 (2)
MSR Elixir 3 Three-Season Tent
$300
user rating: 5 of 5 (2)
Kelty Noah's Tarp 16 Tarp/Shelter
$79 - $99
user rating: 5 of 5 (2)
The North Face 2-Meter Dome Four-Season Tent
$5,496 - $5,500
 
user rating: 5 of 5 (2)
ALPS Mountaineering Orion 4 Three-Season Tent
$110
user rating: 5 of 5 (2)
Grand Trunk Funky Forest Tarp Tarp/Shelter
$80
user rating: 5 of 5 (2)
Kammok Roo Hammock
$69 - $99
user rating: 5 of 5 (2)
Byer Easy Traveller Hammock
$37 - $49
user rating: 5 of 5 (2)
Big Agnes Tensleep Station 6 Three-Season Tent
$376 - $499
user rating: 5 of 5 (2)
Eagles Nest Outfitters JungleNest Hammock Hammock
$100 - $199
user rating: 5 of 5 (2)
Big Agnes Copper Spur UL4 Three-Season Tent
$450 - $649
user rating: 5 of 5 (2)
Kelty Triptease Lightline Tent Accessory
$20
user rating: 5 of 5 (2)
Nite Ize Figure 9 Carabiner Tent Accessory
$2 - $9
user rating: 5 of 5 (2)
Eagles Nest Outfitters OneLink SingleNest Hammock
$210
user rating: 5 of 5 (2)
Eagles Nest Outfitters Double Deluxe Hammock
$67 - $84
user rating: 5 of 5 (2)
Hilleberg Nammatj 3 Four-Season Tent
$795
user rating: 5 of 5 (2)
Hilleberg Saivo Four-Season Tent
$1,345
user rating: 5 of 5 (2)
Eagles Nest Outfitters OneLink DoubleNest Hammock
$220 - $234
user rating: 5 of 5 (1)
Hilleberg Enan Three-Season Tent
$635
user rating: 5 of 5 (1)
Marmot Thor 3P Four-Season Tent
$659
user rating: 5 of 5 (1)
REI Quarter Dome T2 Plus Three-Season Tent
$250
user rating: 5 of 5 (1)
Mountain Hardwear Stronghold Four-Season Tent
$3,500 - $3,750
user rating: 5 of 5 (1)
The North Face Mica FL 2 Three-Season Tent
$279 - $378
user rating: 5 of 5 (1)
Hilleberg Snow and Sand Peg Stake
$70
user rating: 5 of 5 (1)
Big Agnes Rattlesnake SL1 mtnGLO Three-Season Tent
$300
user rating: 5 of 5 (1)
Eagles Nest Outfitters Sub7 Hammock
$70 - $249
user rating: 5 of 5 (1)
Sierra Designs Convert 3 Four-Season Tent
$690
user rating: 5 of 5 (1)
MSR Twin Sisters Tarp/Shelter
$210 - $299
user rating: 5 of 5 (1)
ALPS Mountaineering Meramac 6 Three-Season Tent
$143
user rating: 5 of 5 (1)
Hennessy Hammock Hyperlite Asym Zip Hammock
$280
user rating: 5 of 5 (1)
Coghlan's Tarp Clips Tent Accessory
$4
user rating: 5 of 5 (1)
REI Passage 2 Tent Three-Season Tent
$159
user rating: 5 of 5 (1)
Eureka! Taron 2 Three-Season Tent
$180
user rating: 5 of 5 (1)
MSR Zing Tarp/Shelter
$339
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What’s the “best” tent or shelter for you? Consider your personal outdoor needs, preferences, and budget:

  • Conditions:
    First, and most important, in what seasons, conditions, and terrain will you use your tent, tarp, or hammock? Choose a shelter that can handle the conditions you expect to encounter (rain, snow, wind, heat, humidity, biting insects, an energetic scout troop), but don’t buy more tent than you truly need, and don’t expect one tent to do it all.
  • Capacity:
    Tents are typically classified by sleeping capacity (i.e. one-person, two-person, etc). However, a tent's stated sleeping capacity usually does not include much (or any) space for your gear and there’s no sizing standard between tent manufacturers. Some users size up.
  • Livability:
    Will you use the tent as a basecamp or is it an emergency shelter only? To determine if you and your gear will fit, look at the shelter’s dimensions, including floor and vestibule square areas, height and headroom (including at the sides), plus the number and placement of doors, gear lofts, and pockets, to assess personal livability, comfort, and footprint.
  • Weight and Packed Size:
    If you’ll be backpacking, climbing, cycling, or otherwise carrying that shelter, consider its weight, packed size (and your pack it needs to fit in), and its space-to-weight ratio before automatically opting for the bigger tent. Paddlers and car campers have more room to work with, but everyone should consider how the tent and its parts pack up for stowage.
  • Design:
    Tents come in various designs. Freestanding tents can stand alone without stakes or guy lines and can be easily moved or have dirt and other debris shaken out without being disassembled, though they still need to be staked out. Rounded, geodesic domes are stable and able to withstand heavy snow loads and wind. Tunnel tents are narrow and rectangular, and large family cabin tents are best for warm-weather campground outings.
  • Other features and specs to consider include single versus double-wall, ease of setup, stability, weather resistance, ventilation, , and any noteworthy features.
  • Read more in our guide to tents.