Tents and Shelters

Ready for a night out? Whether you’re an ultralight alpinist, family of backpackers, devoted hanger, or comfort camper, you'll find the best tents, tarps, and hammocks for your outdoor overnights right here.

Check out our top picks below—including price comparisons—to shelter you in any terrain, trip, or season: winter mountaineering, three-season thru-hiking, warm weather car camping, hammock hanging, alpine bivys, tarps, and emergency shelter.

Or you can browse our thousands of independent tent and shelter ratings and reviews by product type, brand, or price. Written by real-world hikers, backpackers, alpinists, climbers, and paddlers, Trailspace community reviews will help you select a dependable, field-tested, outdoor abode just right for your next adventure.

Learn more about how to choose a tent/shelter below »

Category

Four-Season
3-4 Season Convertible
Three-Season
Warm Weather
Bivy Sacks
Tarps and Shelters
Hammocks
Bug Nets
Accessories

Brand

Eagles Nest Outfitters
Terra Nova
Hilleberg
MSR
Marmot
Grand Trunk
REI
Sierra Designs
EMS
Black Diamond

User

Unisex
Men's
Kids'

Price

less than $25
$25 - $49.99
$50 - $99.99
$100 - $199.99
$200 - $299.99
$300 - $399.99
$400 - $499.99
$500 and above

Recent Tent/Shelter Reviews

Heroclip

rated 5 of 5 stars The Heroclip is fantastic, I use it everywhere. This clip is amazing. I keep finding that odd jobs are made easier with help from a HeroClip. I have used it while camping, backpacking, biking and around the house. It’s versatility and design make this clip worth a purchase.  Full review

Gossamer Gear SpinnShelter

rated 5 of 5 stars ultralight and very weatherproof tarp Late to the dance with my spinnshelter,got it used on ebay,weight is 8 oz on my scale,can use treking poles to pitch,sticks, or aftermarket poles-i bought 2 used for around 20 bucks.The tarp is made of spinnaker cloth-lite and strong. i pitch with ground hogs-use ground hogs for everything!!!!i bought a dimma bivy form BORAH to hang under it but one night just slept in my sleeping bag on a ground cloth,the tarp bivy combo was under 20 oz the spinnshelter has… Full review

Equip Mosquito Hammock

rated 4 of 5 stars An economical hammock setup for those not willing to spend a fortune on a hammock. Tough material and a well made mosquito net make this hammock an amazing value in my opinion. After camping in a tent and sleeping on the ground for years, I finally broke down and bought a hammock. Turns out it was the best decision I ever made. I have since slept in a couple different hammocks including the expensive, high end hammocks. I found this hammock at Walmart for $40 and decided to pick one up. After using… Full review

MSR Hubba Hubba NX 2P

rated 5 of 5 stars Very lightweight and capable tent with room for two people and a vestibule on each side. Quick and easy setup and take down. The MSR Hubba Hubba NX is a lightweight and capable three-person tent. Setup takes just minutes—it is so easy and one person can do it alone with no problems. Also packs easily in the tent bag as it's not your normal stuff sack type bag. The tent weight is very light but still provides complete waterproof coverage with very little condensation on the inside. A vestibule… Full review

REI Passage 2 Tent

rated 5 of 5 stars A solid two-person tent used in our Boy Scout Troop for our Scouts. Two doors, vestibules, gear pockets, simple setup. With proper care these tents will last a very long time. Color coded setup makes it easy even for our youngest Scouts. Adjustable top vents insure great condensation control. Included stakes and guy out lines, and even large attic space. Optional footprint makes it even better as a single unit. Our Scout Troop has used these tents for the past several years. Super easy setup by… Full review

Heroclip

rated 4.5 of 5 stars The HeroClip is a very versatile accessory clip that can be used in a number of applications both in the outdoors and around the house. OverviewYears ago people started using climbing carabineers as accessory clips to hold keys and other various items and as time went on manufactures started coming out with accessory clips that had many similarities to climbing carabineers from a look and operation perspective, but had no real load carrying capability and were only intended to be used as low cost… Full review

Exped Travel Box II Plus

rated 5 of 5 stars Large bug net with a built-in floor for full protection. Great for use in shelters or under a tarp. Zippers on two sides make for easy access and lots of tie out points allow for setup in varied conditions. The Exped Travel Box II Plus is a souped up version of their basic, rectangular bug net, meant for multi-person use. They added a floor, side entry zippers, and some additional tie out points. The result is a very functional bug house that provides for a lot of protected space. I set it up in… Full review

Six Moon Designs Skyscape Scout

rated 3.5 of 5 stars Good value, very well constructed, just the right price point to get involved with UL hiking. I purchased the SMD Skyscape Scout tent to take on a 100-mile Colorado Trail segment hike. The Skyscape Scout from Six Moon Designs was the best choice to get started. The Scout is the same tent as the Trekker, but in poly. Only a slight weight penalty separates the Scout from the Trekker, so the choice (for me) was obvious.  The tent is easy to set up, has good headroom, but small vestibules. Ventilation… Full review

Easton Torrent 2

rated 2 of 5 stars Disappointed in this tent and if I can reach a company rep I will be asking for either a refund or replacement. I loved this tent at first use...then after one season in storage I used it a second time and noticed the fly wouldn’t slide easily over the poles. What had happened was the coating underneath was breaking down and had become very sticky.  The next time I used it it was worse and coatings on other parts were breaking down and one of the tie-backs and one of the velcro loops came off… Full review

Top-Rated Tents and Shelters

Sort by: name | rating | price | availability | recently reviewed

user rating: 5 of 5 (109)
Eagles Nest Outfitters DoubleNest Hammock
$59 - $89
user rating: 5 of 5 (17)
Eagles Nest Outfitters Atlas Straps Hammock Accessory
$25 - $39
user rating: 5 of 5 (12)
Terra Nova Ultra Quasar Four-Season Tent
$702 - $779
user rating: 5 of 5 (10)
Hilleberg Nallo 2 Four-Season Tent
$735 - $835
user rating: 5 of 5 (9)
MSR Hubba Hubba NX 2P Three-Season Tent
$400
user rating: 5 of 5 (8)
Hilleberg Soulo Four-Season Tent
$685
user rating: 5 of 5 (7)
Hilleberg Nammatj 3 GT Four-Season Tent
$989
user rating: 5 of 5 (7)
MSR E-Wing Tarp/Shelter
$175
user rating: 5 of 5 (6)
Marmot Limelight 4P Three-Season Tent
$303 - $379
user rating: 5 of 5 (6)
Grand Trunk Double Parachute Nylon Hammock Hammock
$65 - $99
user rating: 5 of 5 (4)
REI Passage 2 Tent Three-Season Tent
$159
user rating: 5 of 5 (4)
Sierra Designs Lightning 2 FL Three-Season Tent
$284 - $369
user rating: 5 of 5 (3)
EMS Velocity 1 Tent Three-Season Tent
$188
user rating: 5 of 5 (3)
Black Diamond Mega Light Tarp/Shelter
$290
user rating: 5 of 5 (3)
MSR Elixir 3 Three-Season Tent
$300
user rating: 5 of 5 (3)
Kodiak Canvas 10x10 Flex-Bow Canvas Tent Deluxe Four-Season Tent
$550
user rating: 5 of 5 (3)
Hilleberg Kaitum 2 Four-Season Tent
$895 - $1,020
user rating: 5 of 5 (3)
Hilleberg Nallo 3 GT Four-Season Tent
$885
user rating: 5 of 5 (2)
Hyperlite Mountain Gear Flat Tarp Tarp/Shelter
$315
user rating: 5 of 5 (2)
Kelty Noah's Tarp 16 Tarp/Shelter
$75 - $99
user rating: 5 of 5 (2)
REI Quarter Dome 1 Three-Season Tent
$279
user rating: 5 of 5 (2)
Napier Sportz SUV Tent Warm Weather Tent
$340 - $369
user rating: 5 of 5 (2)
ALPS Mountaineering Zenith 3 AL Tent Three-Season Tent
$130
user rating: 5 of 5 (2)
Eureka! Taron 2 Three-Season Tent
$145 - $179
user rating: 5 of 5 (2)
Eagles Nest Outfitters HouseFly Rain Tarp Tarp/Shelter
$140
user rating: 5 of 5 (2)
Marmot Haven 2P Three-Season Tent
$420
user rating: 5 of 5 (2)
Exped Gemini 2 Three-Season Tent
$499
user rating: 5 of 5 (2)
Grand Trunk Funky Forest Tarp Tarp/Shelter
$50 - $79
user rating: 5 of 5 (2)
Kammok Roo Hammock
$67 - $99
user rating: 5 of 5 (2)
Byer Easy Traveller Hammock
$50 - $59
user rating: 5 of 5 (2)
Kelty Triptease Lightline Tent Accessory
$15
user rating: 5 of 5 (2)
The North Face Stormbreak 2 Three-Season Tent
$143 - $159
user rating: 5 of 5 (2)
Eagles Nest Outfitters OneLink SingleNest Hammock
$187 - $209
user rating: 5 of 5 (2)
Eagles Nest Outfitters Double Deluxe Hammock
$85
user rating: 5 of 5 (2)
Hilleberg Nammatj 3 Four-Season Tent
$795
user rating: 5 of 5 (2)
Hilleberg Saivo Four-Season Tent
$1,365
user rating: 5 of 5 (2)
Eagles Nest Outfitters JungleNest Hammock
$100
user rating: 5 of 5 (2)
Eagles Nest Outfitters OneLink DoubleNest Hammock
$220
user rating: 5 of 5 (1)
Therm-a-Rest Vela HD Quilt Top Quilt
$240 - $279
user rating: 5 of 5 (1)
Eagles Nest Outfitters Reactor Hammock
$66 - $94
user rating: 5 of 5 (1)
Hilleberg Enan Three-Season Tent
$525 - $635
user rating: 5 of 5 (1)
Mountain Hardwear Stronghold Four-Season Tent
$3,500 - $3,750
user rating: 5 of 5 (1)
L.L.Bean Mountain Light XT 3-Person Tent Three-Season Tent
$269
user rating: 5 of 5 (1)
Big Agnes Rattlesnake SL1 mtnGLO Three-Season Tent
$225 - $239
user rating: 5 of 5 (1)
Eagles Nest Outfitters Sub7 Hammock
$49 - $69
user rating: 5 of 5 (1)
Sierra Designs Convert 3 Four-Season Tent
$450 - $689
user rating: 5 of 5 (1)
MSR Twin Sisters Tarp/Shelter
$300 - $399
user rating: 5 of 5 (1)
Hennessy Hammock Hyperlite Asym Zip Hammock
$280
user rating: 5 of 5 (1)
Coghlan's Tarp Clips Tent Accessory
$4
user rating: 5 of 5 (1)
MSR Remote 2 Four-Season Tent
$800
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What’s the “best” tent or shelter for you? Consider your personal outdoor needs, preferences, and budget:

  • Conditions:
    First, and most important, in what seasons, conditions, and terrain will you use your tent, tarp, or hammock? Choose a shelter that can handle the conditions you expect to encounter (rain, snow, wind, heat, humidity, biting insects, an energetic scout troop), but don’t buy more tent than you truly need, and don’t expect one tent to do it all.
  • Capacity:
    Tents are typically classified by sleeping capacity (i.e. one-person, two-person, etc). However, a tent's stated sleeping capacity usually does not include much (or any) space for your gear and there’s no sizing standard between tent manufacturers. Some users size up.
  • Livability:
    Will you use the tent as a basecamp or is it an emergency shelter only? To determine if you and your gear will fit, look at the shelter’s dimensions, including floor and vestibule square areas, height and headroom (including at the sides), plus the number and placement of doors, gear lofts, and pockets, to assess personal livability, comfort, and footprint.
  • Weight and Packed Size:
    If you’ll be backpacking, climbing, cycling, or otherwise carrying that shelter, consider its weight, packed size (and your pack it needs to fit in), and its space-to-weight ratio before automatically opting for the bigger tent. Paddlers and car campers have more room to work with, but everyone should consider how the tent and its parts pack up for stowage.
  • Design:
    Tents come in various designs. Freestanding tents can stand alone without stakes or guy lines and can be easily moved or have dirt and other debris shaken out without being disassembled, though they still need to be staked out. Rounded, geodesic domes are stable and able to withstand heavy snow loads and wind. Tunnel tents are narrow and rectangular, and large family cabin tents are best for warm-weather campground outings.
  • Other features and specs to consider include single versus double-wall, ease of setup, stability, weather resistance, ventilation, , and any noteworthy features.
  • Read more in our guide to tents.