Tents and Shelters

Ready for a night out? Whether you’re an ultralight alpinist, family of backpackers, devoted hanger, or comfort camper, you'll find the best tents, tarps, and hammocks for your outdoor overnights right here.

Check out our top picks below—including price comparisons—to shelter you in any terrain, trip, or season: winter mountaineering, three-season thru-hiking, warm weather car camping, hammock hanging, alpine bivys, tarps, and emergency shelter.

Or you can browse our thousands of independent tent and shelter ratings and reviews by product type, brand, or price. Written by real-world hikers, backpackers, alpinists, climbers, and paddlers, Trailspace community reviews will help you select a dependable, field-tested, outdoor abode just right for your next adventure.

Learn more about how to choose a tent/shelter below »

Categories

Four-Season
3-4 Season Convertible
Three-Season
Warm Weather
Bivy Sacks
Tarps and Shelters
Hammocks
Bug Nets
Accessories

Brands

Eagles Nest Outfitters
NEMO
Hilleberg
MSR
Marmot
Grand Trunk
Sierra Designs
EMS
Black Diamond
ALPS Mountaineering

Genders

Unisex
Men's
Kids'

Price

less than $25
$25 - $49.99
$50 - $99.99
$100 - $199.99
$200 - $299.99
$300 - $399.99
$400 - $499.99
$500 and above

Recent Tent/Shelter Reviews

MSR Elixir 2

rated 4.5 of 5 stars 2 person tent tested out on the GR20. Resistant, light and easy to stock ! 2.6 kg with the removable ground sheet. Not that heavy if separated into two backpacks, but I would be hapy to see it coming down to 2kg. The Hubba NX  is lighter but too fragile, this why I see the Elixir loosing just a bit of a eight, but keeping waterproofness and resistance against wind-shocks, rain and snow. By the way, about wind-shocks. I added extra cord loops to each part where you can use tent pegs. About a 40cm… Full review

Big Agnes Fly Creek UL2

rated 4 of 5 stars Awesome tent, great to backpack with. Very compact, quick to set up, and has kept me dry in torrential rains and 30+ mph winds. Minus a star only because it will not stand on its own, and one of the zippers quickly broke on me. Setup:  Very fast setup, 5-10 minutes depending on surface. Really recommend getting the footprint not only for protection, but also allows you to just use the canopy if you so choose. Also makes setting up an easier process. Wasn't a fan of the original stakes, replaced… Full review

Hillary Hex Dome with 2 Lockers

rated 5 of 5 stars A durable and great roomy tent for us bigger people. I'm 6'4" and can almost stand up in it. I bought this tent on clearance at Sears for just under $40. LOVE IT!!! I've been using it several times a year for about 10 years. As I am a bigger guy, this tent has plenty of room, surprisingly it looks small from the outside. Put some scotch guard on it, and you are good to go. This tent even made it through a tropical storm, while several other tents did not.  Just make sure to air it out. I accidentally… Full review

MSR Fling

rated 4.5 of 5 stars Lightweight and plenty of room, this is an excellent backpacking tent for those looking for a middle ground between ultralight tarps and double wall tents. Would be a little snug for two larger people. Simple straightforward design. Either free standing with the ridge pole, which gives a little extra headroom, or travel lighter and leave the ridge pole at home and set up the tent with stakes and tension lines. Awning side venting helps reduce condensation, the only real drawback to a 3-season single… Full review

No Limits Kings Peak II

rated 3 of 5 stars Terrific tent, good size. A little heavy with rain-fly. Small pole broke on third trip. Setup was easy, though tent is not free-standing.  Handles moisture well, no moisture inside with rain-fly on.  Well ventilated with easy roll-up sides. Roomy inside with room (outside tent) under rain-fly for equipment.  Tent and accessories are easy to pack in ample sized bag that compacts down with straps. Tent has handy inside 'junk' pouches hanging from the roof. On the third use the small pole split,… Full review

ALPS Mountaineering Lynx 1

rated 4.5 of 5 stars Lightweight, packs small. Goes up easy. With vestibule, plenty of room for sleeping and your gear. Great for backpackers who don't share a tent. My first foray into the lightweight backpacking tent. It fit nicely into my pack as it was small enough to lie sideways right into the sleeping bag compartment. It has two poles with the simplest "X" setup design — no origami skills required. Inside I can lay down completely, AND, do a complete sit-up without touching my head on any part of the roof. Full review

MSR Mutha Hubba

rated 4.5 of 5 stars This is an excellent choice for two- to three-people hiking trips. The tent comfortably fits three average sized people, the twin vestibules will hold the gear, and the ventilation is adequate. Just be sure to use a footprint and guy out the fly on the sides of the tent. This is an excellent tent for small group hiking trips. It is lightweight, waterproof, and surprisingly durable for it being made out of fairly lightweight materials. I really like that it actually fits three average to tall adults… Full review

REI Chrysalis UL Tent

rated 3.5 of 5 stars This tent is a very lightweight tent and great option for people seeking a cheap lightweight tent for their expeditions. The REI Chrysalis is a very minimalist tent and does not offer much from but is still comfortable to sleep in I love the REI Chrysalis. This tent is ultralight and almost comparable to Big Agnes tents that are almost double or triple its price. Weighing in at only 3 lb it is a great option for all backpackers. There is not much interior space but you can make it work and feel… Full review

Fjallraven Abisko Endurance 2

rated 5 of 5 stars Bought this for summer hiking in Lapland and other places. Also meaning to use it at winter time later when skiing. Very good tent for hiking. Bought this for summer hiking in Lapland. Also meaning to use it at winter time when skiing. First used it when it was mid summer and at a mountain in Lapland. It was really nice because there is space for backpack, hiking shoes, and wet clothes in the vestibule. Also this Endurance model has equal height from middle to backwards and that is good because… Full review

Top-Rated Tents and Shelters

Sort by: name | rating | price | availability | recently reviewed

user rating: 5 of 5 (108)
Eagles Nest Outfitters DoubleNest Hammock
$52 - $89
user rating: 5 of 5 (15)
Eagles Nest Outfitters Atlas Straps Hammock Accessory
$22 - $39
user rating: 5 of 5 (11)
NEMO Morpho AR Three-Season Tent
$390
user rating: 5 of 5 (10)
Hilleberg Nallo 2 Four-Season Tent
$735
user rating: 5 of 5 (7)
Hilleberg Soulo Four-Season Tent
$685
user rating: 5 of 5 (7)
MSR E-Wing Tarp/Shelter
$100 - $174
user rating: 5 of 5 (6)
Hilleberg Nammatj 3 GT Four-Season Tent
$979
user rating: 5 of 5 (6)
Eagles Nest Outfitters ProFly Rain Tarp Tarp/Shelter
$80 - $99
user rating: 5 of 5 (5)
Marmot Limelight 4P Three-Season Tent
$369
user rating: 5 of 5 (5)
Grand Trunk Double Parachute Nylon Hammock Hammock
$65 - $74
user rating: 5 of 5 (4)
Sierra Designs Lightning 2 FL Three-Season Tent
$380
user rating: 5 of 5 (3)
EMS Velocity 1 Tent Three-Season Tent
$215
user rating: 5 of 5 (3)
Black Diamond Mega Light Tarp/Shelter
$232 - $289
user rating: 5 of 5 (3)
Hilleberg Kaitum 2 Four-Season Tent
$885
user rating: 5 of 5 (3)
Hilleberg Nallo 3 GT Four-Season Tent
$885
user rating: 5 of 5 (3)
ALPS Mountaineering Lynx 2 AL Three-Season Tent
$140
user rating: 5 of 5 (2)
Hyperlite Mountain Gear Flat Tarp Tarp/Shelter
$300
user rating: 5 of 5 (2)
MSR Elixir 3 Three-Season Tent
$300
user rating: 5 of 5 (2)
Kelty Noah's Tarp 16 Tarp/Shelter
$100
user rating: 5 of 5 (2)
Napier Sportz SUV Tent Warm Weather Tent
$340 - $369
user rating: 5 of 5 (2)
ALPS Mountaineering Orion 4 Three-Season Tent
$119
user rating: 5 of 5 (2)
Eureka! Taron 2 Three-Season Tent
$145 - $179
user rating: 5 of 5 (2)
Eagles Nest Outfitters HouseFly Rain Tarp Tarp/Shelter
$140
user rating: 5 of 5 (2)
Exped Gemini 2 Three-Season Tent
$399 - $498
user rating: 5 of 5 (2)
Grand Trunk Funky Forest Tarp Tarp/Shelter
$80
user rating: 5 of 5 (2)
Kammok Roo Hammock
$99
user rating: 5 of 5 (2)
Byer Easy Traveller Hammock
$47 - $49
user rating: 5 of 5 (2)
Kelty Triptease Lightline Tent Accessory
$14 - $19
user rating: 5 of 5 (2)
Nite Ize Figure 9 Carabiner Tent Accessory
$3 - $10
user rating: 5 of 5 (2)
Eagles Nest Outfitters OneLink SingleNest Hammock
$210
user rating: 5 of 5 (2)
Eagles Nest Outfitters Double Deluxe Hammock
$64 - $84
user rating: 5 of 5 (2)
Hilleberg Nammatj 3 Four-Season Tent
$795
user rating: 5 of 5 (2)
Hilleberg Saivo Four-Season Tent
$1,345
user rating: 5 of 5 (2)
Eagles Nest Outfitters JungleNest Hammock
$100
user rating: 5 of 5 (2)
Kodiak Canvas 10x10 Flex-Bow Deluxe Tent Four-Season Tent
$550
user rating: 5 of 5 (2)
Eagles Nest Outfitters OneLink DoubleNest Hammock
$220
user rating: 5 of 5 (1)
Ferrino Snowbound 3 Four-Season Tent
$300
user rating: 5 of 5 (1)
Eagles Nest Outfitters Reactor Hammock
$95
user rating: 5 of 5 (1)
Hilleberg Enan Three-Season Tent
$585 - $635
user rating: 5 of 5 (1)
Marmot Thor 3P Four-Season Tent
$659
user rating: 5 of 5 (1)
Mountain Hardwear Stronghold Four-Season Tent
$3,750
user rating: 5 of 5 (1)
The North Face Mica FL 2 Three-Season Tent
$279 - $379
user rating: 5 of 5 (1)
L.L.Bean Mountain Light XT 3-Person Tent Three-Season Tent
$269
user rating: 5 of 5 (1)
REI Quarter Dome 1 Three-Season Tent
$229
user rating: 5 of 5 (1)
Big Agnes Rattlesnake SL1 mtnGLO Three-Season Tent
$240 - $299
user rating: 5 of 5 (1)
Eagles Nest Outfitters Sub7 Hammock
$70
user rating: 5 of 5 (1)
Sierra Designs Convert 3 Four-Season Tent
$690
user rating: 5 of 5 (1)
MSR Twin Sisters Tarp/Shelter
$300
user rating: 5 of 5 (1)
Hennessy Hammock Hyperlite Asym Zip Hammock
$280
user rating: 5 of 5 (1)
Coghlan's Tarp Clips Tent Accessory
$3
Page 1 of 72:  1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9  Next » 

What’s the “best” tent or shelter for you? Consider your personal outdoor needs, preferences, and budget:

  • Conditions:
    First, and most important, in what seasons, conditions, and terrain will you use your tent, tarp, or hammock? Choose a shelter that can handle the conditions you expect to encounter (rain, snow, wind, heat, humidity, biting insects, an energetic scout troop), but don’t buy more tent than you truly need, and don’t expect one tent to do it all.
  • Capacity:
    Tents are typically classified by sleeping capacity (i.e. one-person, two-person, etc). However, a tent's stated sleeping capacity usually does not include much (or any) space for your gear and there’s no sizing standard between tent manufacturers. Some users size up.
  • Livability:
    Will you use the tent as a basecamp or is it an emergency shelter only? To determine if you and your gear will fit, look at the shelter’s dimensions, including floor and vestibule square areas, height and headroom (including at the sides), plus the number and placement of doors, gear lofts, and pockets, to assess personal livability, comfort, and footprint.
  • Weight and Packed Size:
    If you’ll be backpacking, climbing, cycling, or otherwise carrying that shelter, consider its weight, packed size (and your pack it needs to fit in), and its space-to-weight ratio before automatically opting for the bigger tent. Paddlers and car campers have more room to work with, but everyone should consider how the tent and its parts pack up for stowage.
  • Design:
    Tents come in various designs. Freestanding tents can stand alone without stakes or guy lines and can be easily moved or have dirt and other debris shaken out without being disassembled, though they still need to be staked out. Rounded, geodesic domes are stable and able to withstand heavy snow loads and wind. Tunnel tents are narrow and rectangular, and large family cabin tents are best for warm-weather campground outings.
  • Other features and specs to consider include single versus double-wall, ease of setup, stability, weather resistance, ventilation, , and any noteworthy features.
  • Read more in our guide to tents.