Tents and Shelters

Ready for a night out? Whether you’re an ultralight alpinist, family of backpackers, devoted hanger, or comfort camper, you'll find the best tents, tarps, and hammocks for your outdoor overnights right here.

Check out our top picks below—including price comparisons—to shelter you in any terrain, trip, or season: winter mountaineering, three-season thru-hiking, warm weather car camping, hammock hanging, alpine bivys, tarps, and emergency shelter.

Or you can browse our thousands of independent tent and shelter ratings and reviews by product type, brand, or price. Written by real-world hikers, backpackers, alpinists, climbers, and paddlers, Trailspace community reviews will help you select a dependable, field-tested, outdoor abode just right for your next adventure.

Learn more about how to choose a tent/shelter below »

Categories

Four-Season
3-4 Season Convertible
Three-Season
Warm Weather
Bivy Sacks
Tarps and Shelters
Hammocks
Accessories

Brands

Eureka!
Big Agnes
Kelty
Tarptent
Coleman
Mountain Hardwear
Outdoor Research
Marmot
Mountainsmith
Grand Trunk

Price

less than $25
$25 - $49.99
$50 - $99.99
$100 - $199.99
$200 - $299.99
$300 - $399.99
$400 - $499.99
$500 and above

Recent Tent/Shelter Reviews

Eureka! Timberline 2

rated 1 of 5 stars We have purchased Timberline tents for our Boy Scout troop in the past and found them useful, easy to set up, and good quality (lasting many years). However, the last purchase of eight tents in 2013, was a disaster. Eureka changed the zippers — and they won't stay closed. The teeth on the zippers don't hold, and if you pull the zipper just right, and manage to close the zipper, it pulls open with a very light pull (even the wind will open it). Simply, they won't stay shut! We're now looking for… Full review

Big Agnes Lone Spring 3

rated 4 of 5 stars Simple structure, spacious interior, and durable materials. Great for two and a dog during cool weather adventures. Highly recommended for car camping and the occasional backpacking trip. I picked up the Lone Spring 3 (LS3) to function as a car camping tent primarily and to be used for infrequent backpacking trips with my partner. I chose it because of the great price, the sturdy materials, and ample space. I really only found the weight, the single door, and finicky poles the only downsides: all… Full review

Kelty Grand Mesa 4

rated 4 of 5 stars It's a solid tent. It has perform great in the rain and cold, and has great ventilation during hot weather. There's plenty of room for 4 people. It's a bit heavy and best used for car camping. I have had this tent for a few years now. Have used it mostly car camping with the Boy Scouts and it has worked great in all types of weather. Took it on a backpacking trip recently and realized that's too heavy (about 11 pounds) to haul around on the Appalachian Trail. Full review

Tarptent Scarp 2

rated 4 of 5 stars This light 2-person tent is roomy and easy to set up. With two doors and two vestibules there is plenty of venting when weather permits. The inner tent options and crossing pole options make it a 4-season tent if desired. This Tarptent 2-person tent is all silnylon for light weight. The quality and design features make it one of the best 2-person backpacking tents available.  In a pinch the tent is large enough for three ("consenting" ;o) adults sleeping head-to-toe. See Tarptent website photo. Full review

Coleman Hooligan 4 Tent

rated 5 of 5 stars Great tent overall for car camping. Rain proof out of the box. Lots of room and easy to set up. Definitely not a backpacking tent, but a great car camping tent. The vestibule is a great plus. Setup overall is easy, but there are a lot of guy ropes that have to be used. By using the guy ropes, you do get great ventilation. I have been caught in an 8-hour overnight storm while camping with our troop. Stayed dry the entire time. As usual says it is a 4-person, but really is a comfortable two-person… Full review

Big Agnes Copper Spur UL1

rated 5 of 5 stars A great lightweight tent for someone over 6 feet tall. It sets up fast, kept me dry through some serious downpours and didn't feel claustrophobic. At 6' 3", I could still sit upright and pull on a T-shirt without a fight. Held up well through a thru-hike of the Colorado Trail. While planning a thru-hike of the Colorado Trail for the summer of 2014, I decided that I needed to lighten the load and quit carrying a 2-person tent. Since the trip would entail a month or so of camping in a wide variety… Full review

Mountain Hardwear Direkt 2

rated 5 of 5 stars This tent is every bit as waterproof and breathable as advertised, very strong also. My other 4-season tent weighs seven pounds and is made for three people, so when I got serious about alpine climbing I wanted something lighter and faster. The Direkt had such good reviews and only weighs a tad over two pounds, so I figured I couldn't go wrong. This tent is about as heavy as two bivy bags, so why not use it instead of one of those horrible things? Setup The Direkt is a simple two-pole dome, which… Full review

Outdoor Research Aurora Bivy

rated 4 of 5 stars This is a great product for a minimalist backpacker. Super lightweight and takes up very little space. Setup is as easy as unrolling a sleeping bag.  Material is strong. The Gore-Tex material is amazing. I have crawled in slightly damp and woken up dry. Minor condensation on the inside surface of the material when using it below -15° C. Not enough to make sleeping bag damp. Packs up smaller than a 1 litre Nalgene bottle. Does not have a hoop to keep material off of your face, but there are loops… Full review

Marmot Limelight 2P

rated 5 of 5 stars I own two tents and this is always my go-to tent. Love this tent. It sets up fast and easy. Great for three-season camping and I like the raindrop window on the fly. I have owned it for two years now and it has stood up well. Full review

Top-Rated Tents and Shelters

Sort by: name | rating | price | availability | recently reviewed

Eureka! Timberline 2
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (19)
Eureka!
Timberline 2
reviewed Oct 19, 2014
$120 - $152
Big Agnes Lone Spring 3
user rating: 4 of 5 (1)
Big Agnes
Lone Spring 3
reviewed Oct 18, 2014
$250 - $269
Kelty Grand Mesa 4
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (4)
Kelty
Grand Mesa 4
reviewed Oct 17, 2014
$200 - $239
Tarptent Scarp 2
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (2)
Tarptent
Scarp 2
reviewed Oct 16, 2014
$355 MSRP
Coleman Hooligan 4 Tent
user rating: 5 of 5 (1)
Coleman
Hooligan 4 Tent
reviewed Oct 15, 2014
$90 - $99
Big Agnes Copper Spur UL1
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (8)
Big Agnes
Copper Spur UL1
reviewed Oct 14, 2014
$350 - $369
Mountain Hardwear Direkt 2
user rating: 5 of 5 (1)
Mountain Hardwear
Direkt 2
reviewed Oct 14, 2014
$400 - $550
Outdoor Research Aurora Bivy
user rating: 4 of 5 (3)
Outdoor Research
Aurora Bivy
reviewed Oct 12, 2014
$167 - $200
Marmot Limelight 2P
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (22)
Marmot
Limelight 2P
reviewed Oct 11, 2014
$175 - $219
Mountainsmith Morrison 2
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (6)
Mountainsmith
Morrison 2
reviewed Oct 10, 2014
$135 - $179
Marmot Limelight 3P
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (15)
Marmot
Limelight 3P
reviewed Oct 9, 2014
$223 - $279
Grand Trunk Ultralight Hammock
user rating: 4 of 5 (8)
Grand Trunk
Ultralight Hammock
reviewed Oct 9, 2014
$20 - $29
Big Agnes Fly Creek UL2
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (16)
Big Agnes
Fly Creek UL2
reviewed Oct 9, 2014
$370 - $389
Exped Andromeda II
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (3)
Exped
Andromeda II
reviewed Oct 9, 2014
$689
Marmot Limelight 4P
user rating: 5 of 5 (5)
Marmot
Limelight 4P
reviewed Oct 9, 2014
$271 - $369
 
user rating: 5 of 5 (5)
Eureka!
Wind River 2
reviewed Oct 8, 2014
discontinued
Lawson Equipment Titanium Tent Stake
user rating: 5 of 5 (1)
Lawson Equipment
Titanium Tent Stake
reviewed Oct 8, 2014
$3 MSRP
Coleman SunDome 4 Tent 9' x 7'
user rating: 3.5 of 5 (5)
Coleman
SunDome 4 Tent 9' x 7'
reviewed Oct 8, 2014
$70
Big Agnes Copper Spur UL2
user rating: 4 of 5 (9)
Big Agnes
Copper Spur UL2
reviewed Oct 7, 2014
$400
Simply Light Designs Streamliner SL
user rating: 5 of 5 (1)
Simply Light Designs
Streamliner SL
reviewed Oct 5, 2014
HammockGear Standard Cuben Fiber Tarp with Doors
user rating: 5 of 5 (1)
HammockGear
Standard Cuben Fiber Tarp with Doors
reviewed Oct 2, 2014
$295 MSRP
Jacks 'R' Better Greylock 3
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (3)
Jacks 'R' Better
Greylock 3
reviewed Oct 2, 2014
$220 MSRP
Eureka! Midori 2
user rating: 3.5 of 5 (3)
Eureka!
Midori 2
reviewed Oct 2, 2014
$160
Vango Tempest 400
user rating: 5 of 5 (1)
Vango
Tempest 400
reviewed Sep 28, 2014
Eureka! Solitaire
user rating: 3.5 of 5 (48)
Eureka!
Solitaire
reviewed Sep 27, 2014
$72 - $89
Eureka! Apex 2XT
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (28)
Eureka!
Apex 2XT
reviewed Sep 26, 2014
$115 - $149
ALPS Mountaineering Zephyr 2.0
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (11)
ALPS Mountaineering
Zephyr 2.0
reviewed Sep 26, 2014
$130 - $219
Mountain Hardwear Lightwedge 3 DP
user rating: 4 of 5 (2)
Mountain Hardwear
Lightwedge 3 DP
reviewed Sep 25, 2014
$330
ALPS Mountaineering Zephyr 1.0
user rating: 4 of 5 (6)
ALPS Mountaineering
Zephyr 1.0
reviewed Sep 25, 2014
$140 - $199
The North Face Flint 1 Tent
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (1)
The North Face
Flint 1 Tent
reviewed Sep 23, 2014
Eureka! Amari Pass 2
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (1)
Eureka!
Amari Pass 2
reviewed Sep 23, 2014
$104 - $139
Kelty Grand Mesa 2
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (16)
Kelty
Grand Mesa 2
reviewed Sep 23, 2014
$120 - $239
REI Sub-Alpine UL
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (5)
REI
Sub-Alpine UL
reviewed Sep 23, 2014
discontinued
Sea to Summit Escapist 15D Tarp
user rating: 4 of 5 (1)
Sea to Summit
Escapist 15D Tarp
reviewed Sep 22, 2014
$169 - $199
Eagles Nest Outfitters Housefly Rain Tarp
user rating: 5 of 5 (1)
Eagles Nest Outfitters
Housefly Rain Tarp
reviewed Sep 21, 2014
$140
Grand Trunk Skeeter Beeter Pro
user rating: 4 of 5 (4)
Grand Trunk
Skeeter Beeter Pro
reviewed Sep 17, 2014
$80
Six Moon Designs Lunar Duo
user rating: 5 of 5 (3)
Six Moon Designs
Lunar Duo
reviewed Sep 16, 2014
Eagles Nest Outfitters DoubleNest
user rating: 5 of 5 (106)
Eagles Nest Outfitters
DoubleNest
reviewed Sep 6, 2014
$59 - $84
The North Face Pebble
user rating: 4 of 5 (4)
The North Face
Pebble
reviewed Sep 4, 2014
discontinued
L.L.Bean King Pine HD 4-Person Dome
user rating: 5 of 5 (1)
L.L.Bean
King Pine HD 4-Person Dome
reviewed Sep 3, 2014
$349
Brooks-Range Ultralite Solo Tarp
user rating: 0.5 of 5 (1)
Brooks-Range
Ultralite Solo Tarp
reviewed Sep 2, 2014
$100
 
user rating: 3.5 of 5 (9)
Ozark Trail
3 Room Family Tent
reviewed Aug 31, 2014
discontinued
Wild Country Mistral
user rating: 5 of 5 (4)
Wild Country
Mistral
reviewed Aug 29, 2014
discontinued
Eureka! Spitfire 1
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (25)
Eureka!
Spitfire 1
reviewed Aug 29, 2014
$100 - $116
NEMO Losi 3P
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (11)
NEMO
Losi 3P
reviewed Aug 28, 2014
$350
 
user rating: 3.5 of 5 (1)
Byer
Amazonas Hammock
reviewed Aug 28, 2014
Kelty TN2
user rating: 4 of 5 (3)
Kelty
TN2
reviewed Aug 27, 2014
$250
MSR OutfitterWing
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (4)
MSR
OutfitterWing
reviewed Aug 26, 2014
discontinued
Mountain Hardwear Airjet 2
user rating: 2 of 5 (16)
Mountain Hardwear
Airjet 2
reviewed Aug 25, 2014
discontinued
 
user rating: 3 of 5 (8)
Northwest Territory
Sierra Dome Backpack Tent 9' x 7'
reviewed Aug 20, 2014
$35 MSRP
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What’s the “best” tent or shelter for you? Consider your personal outdoor needs, preferences, and budget:

  • Conditions:
    First, and most important, in what seasons, conditions, and terrain will you use your tent, tarp, or hammock? Choose a shelter that can handle the conditions you expect to encounter (rain, snow, wind, heat, humidity, biting insects, an energetic scout troop), but don’t buy more tent than you truly need, and don’t expect one tent to do it all.
  • Capacity:
    Tents are typically classified by sleeping capacity (i.e. one-person, two-person, etc). However, a tent's stated sleeping capacity usually does not include much (or any) space for your gear and there’s no sizing standard between tent manufacturers. Some users size up.
  • Livability:
    Will you use the tent as a basecamp or is it an emergency shelter only? To determine if you and your gear will fit, look at the shelter’s dimensions, including floor and vestibule square areas, height and headroom (including at the sides), plus the number and placement of doors, gear lofts, and pockets, to assess personal livability, comfort, and footprint.
  • Weight and Packed Size:
    If you’ll be backpacking, climbing, cycling, or otherwise carrying that shelter, consider its weight, packed size (and your pack it needs to fit in), and its space-to-weight ratio before automatically opting for the bigger tent. Paddlers and car campers have more room to work with, but everyone should consider how the tent and its parts pack up for stowage.
  • Design:
    Tents come in various designs. Freestanding tents can stand alone without stakes or guy lines and can be easily moved or have dirt and other debris shaken out without being disassembled, though they still need to be staked out. Rounded, geodesic domes are stable and able to withstand heavy snow loads and wind. Tunnel tents are narrow and rectangular, and large family cabin tents are best for warm-weather campground outings.
  • Other features and specs to consider include single versus double-wall, ease of setup, stability, weather resistance, ventilation, , and any noteworthy features.
  • Read more in our guide to tents.