Tents and Shelters

Ready for a night out? Whether you’re an ultralight alpinist, family of backpackers, devoted hanger, or comfort camper, you'll find the best tents, tarps, and hammocks for your outdoor overnights right here.

Check out our top picks below—including price comparisons—to shelter you in any terrain, trip, or season: winter mountaineering, three-season thru-hiking, warm weather car camping, hammock hanging, alpine bivys, tarps, and emergency shelter.

Or you can browse our thousands of independent tent and shelter ratings and reviews by product type, brand, or price. Written by real-world hikers, backpackers, alpinists, climbers, and paddlers, Trailspace community reviews will help you select a dependable, field-tested, outdoor abode just right for your next adventure.

Learn more about how to choose a tent/shelter below »

Categories

Four-Season
3-4 Season Convertible
Three-Season
Warm Weather
Bivy Sacks
Tarps and Shelters
Hammocks
Accessories

Brands

Eureka!
Kelty
REI
Sea to Summit
Eagles Nest Outfitters
Grand Trunk
Six Moon Designs
The North Face
L.L.Bean
Brooks-Range

Price

less than $25
$25 - $49.99
$50 - $99.99
$100 - $199.99
$200 - $299.99
$300 - $399.99
$400 - $499.99
$500 and above

Recent Tent/Shelter Reviews

Eureka! Amari Pass 2

rated 4.5 of 5 stars We love our Amari Pass 2 tent, it's roomy, easy to put up. we like the large vestibule. Eureka makes great tents, the detailing is wonderful.  The tent fly is color-coded to match the click points.  The Amari Pass is my favorite Eureka tent to date.  I love the large size for the low weight. This tent is super easy to erect.  It pitches with enough tautness to stay stable in wind which is important down here in the super windy desert climate.  We used it in a rain storm and there was NO condensation,… Full review

Kelty Grand Mesa 2

rated 4 of 5 stars Easy setup for a tent, kind of heavy, but overall a great tent. I bought this tent because it was cheaper, but wasn't built cheaper. I have used this tent many times, and it has held up and done what it was made to do. I can set this tent up in less than 4 minutes by myself, which is a big plus. It's a smart design, and it looks good too. Rain fly works good. When I was camping and it was raining it didn't rain too hard though, not sure what it would do if the rain fell hard and didn't stop. Love… Full review

REI Sub-Alpine UL

rated 2 of 5 stars Used it twice and stored it along with an older Winnebago tent. The Winnebago tent is still perfect but my REI Sub Alpine is now sticky and gummy. The fabric seems to have turned into one big post-it note. Several years ago, my wife and I backpacked into the Desolation Wilderness area near Lake Tahoe for 5 days. The tent was a bit cramped for two people. My wife and I are not fat or tall. We should have bought a three-person tent. We used it and stored it along with an older Winnebago tent. We… Full review

Sea to Summit Escapist 15D Tarp

rated 4 of 5 stars A non-free standing shelter by design that works well with a variety of conditions and platforms. It can be pitched with a pair of trekking poles or in between two trees. It's a versatile shelter that can be used as a ground shelter or even as a hammock tarp. Since this is a modular system, the weight can be easily be distributed between two people. Best used for 3-season backpacking and can be used as a solo or 2-person shelter. Manufacturer Specs: http://www.seatosummit.com.au/products/bug-protection/escapist/… Full review

Eagles Nest Outfitters Housefly Rain Tarp

rated 5 of 5 stars 4 words, Will keep you dry. The Eagles Nest HouseFly is probably one if the best investments I've made to date in my camping gear. I spent 14 days in the Daniel Boone National Forest and it really proved itself worthy of packing. The first night out it rained, not just your mother's everyday light shower, it poured buckets. I wasn't sure if the ENO HouseFly would be up for the job. But to my surprise, me and my gear stayed perfectly dry. I was truly amazed. It's much lighter than most of the… Full review

Grand Trunk Skeeter Beeter Pro

rated 3 of 5 stars Decent starter hammock, comfortable and adequate. If you hang out on the East Coast, get one. After many times watching the sun get lower and searching around for a decent tent pad in SNP and surrounding areas, I, one day, encountered a fella comfortably hanging in a hammock. Thinking back to the many times of tent pad searching and noting the huge amount of trees available, I decided a hammock was worth a try. Totally worth it, especially in SNP and I assume other East Coast parks. On to the hammock… Full review

Six Moon Designs Lunar Duo

rated 4.5 of 5 stars VERY roomy, lightweight two-person tent. I've had this tent for about a year now, and I'm very happy with it. I previously had a Mountain Hardwear Hammerhead 3, which was bombproof but huge and heavy. The Lunar Duo does the job at less than half the weight (3 pounds vs 8). I bought the "Explorer," the sil-nylon version. Setup: Pretty straightforward, but it takes a bit of practice, especially if you're doing it alone. I usually have to take a couple passes at the stake-out points and guy lines before… Full review

Eagles Nest Outfitters DoubleNest

rated 2 of 5 stars Overpriced for what you get, sizes are deceiving. Unless you get it at a significant sale price, there are other choices out there that are just as good. I own a number of hammocks, and the ENO is the more expensive than any of them and gives no advantage in quality for the extra price. My most expensive hammock is a Yukon Outfitters double, which, although its specs say that it is the same width as the ENO, is fully TWO FEET wider than the DoubleNest. It is also two feet longer. So unless you are… Full review

The North Face Pebble

rated 4 of 5 stars Durable, moderate weight, moderate packability. Setup: Because this tent stretches nice and tight and has very little flapping in the wind or pooling of rainwater, it also takes some practice to set it up efficiently. But overall it's not too bad. My main complaint with setup is that the model I bought in 2002 still used pole sleeves rather than clips and the poles had to be threaded through this in a crisscross manner and this is kind of annoying.  Stability: I have camped in some windy locations… Full review

Top-Rated Tents and Shelters

Sort by: name | rating | price | availability | recently reviewed

Eureka! Amari Pass 2
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (1)
Eureka!
Amari Pass 2
reviewed Sep 23, 2014
$140
Kelty Grand Mesa 2
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (16)
Kelty
Grand Mesa 2
reviewed Sep 23, 2014
$120 - $149
REI Sub-Alpine UL
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (5)
REI
Sub-Alpine UL
reviewed Sep 23, 2014
discontinued
Sea to Summit Escapist 15D Tarp
user rating: 4 of 5 (1)
Sea to Summit
Escapist 15D Tarp
reviewed Sep 22, 2014
$135 - $199
Eagles Nest Outfitters Housefly Rain Tarp
user rating: 5 of 5 (1)
Eagles Nest Outfitters
Housefly Rain Tarp
reviewed Sep 21, 2014
$140
Grand Trunk Skeeter Beeter Pro
user rating: 4 of 5 (4)
Grand Trunk
Skeeter Beeter Pro
reviewed Sep 17, 2014
$80
Six Moon Designs Lunar Duo
user rating: 5 of 5 (3)
Six Moon Designs
Lunar Duo
reviewed Sep 16, 2014
Eagles Nest Outfitters DoubleNest
user rating: 5 of 5 (106)
Eagles Nest Outfitters
DoubleNest
reviewed Sep 6, 2014
$63 - $89
The North Face Pebble
user rating: 4 of 5 (4)
The North Face
Pebble
reviewed Sep 4, 2014
discontinued
L.L.Bean King Pine HD 4-Person Dome
user rating: 5 of 5 (1)
L.L.Bean
King Pine HD 4-Person Dome
reviewed Sep 3, 2014
$349
Brooks-Range Ultralite Solo Tarp
user rating: 0.5 of 5 (1)
Brooks-Range
Ultralite Solo Tarp
reviewed Sep 2, 2014
$100
 
user rating: 3.5 of 5 (9)
Ozark Trail
3 Room Family Tent
reviewed Aug 31, 2014
discontinued
Wild Country Mistral
user rating: 5 of 5 (4)
Wild Country
Mistral
reviewed Aug 29, 2014
discontinued
Eureka! Spitfire 1
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (25)
Eureka!
Spitfire 1
reviewed Aug 29, 2014
$110 - $129
NEMO Losi 3P
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (11)
NEMO
Losi 3P
reviewed Aug 28, 2014
$450 MSRP
 
user rating: 3.5 of 5 (1)
Byer
Amazonas Hammock
reviewed Aug 28, 2014
Kelty TraiLogic TN2
user rating: 4 of 5 (3)
Kelty
TraiLogic TN2
reviewed Aug 27, 2014
$250
MSR OutfitterWing
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (4)
MSR
OutfitterWing
reviewed Aug 26, 2014
discontinued
Mountain Hardwear Airjet 2
user rating: 2 of 5 (16)
Mountain Hardwear
Airjet 2
reviewed Aug 25, 2014
discontinued
Eureka! Timberline 2
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (18)
Eureka!
Timberline 2
reviewed Aug 21, 2014
$149 - $169
ALPS Mountaineering Zephyr 2.0
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (9)
ALPS Mountaineering
Zephyr 2.0
reviewed Aug 20, 2014
$165 - $219
 
user rating: 3 of 5 (8)
Northwest Territory
Sierra Dome Backpack Tent 9' x 7'
reviewed Aug 20, 2014
$35 MSRP
 
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (11)
Northwest Territory
Kmart model
reviewed Aug 19, 2014
discontinued
Big Agnes Fly Creek UL2
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (15)
Big Agnes
Fly Creek UL2
reviewed Aug 19, 2014
$331 - $389
Kelty Acadia 4
user rating: 4 of 5 (1)
Kelty
Acadia 4
reviewed Aug 15, 2014
$170
MSR Carbon Core Stake Kit
user rating: 3 of 5 (2)
MSR
Carbon Core Stake Kit
reviewed Aug 14, 2014
$28 - $29
Marmot EOS 1P
user rating: 4 of 5 (15)
Marmot
EOS 1P
reviewed Aug 14, 2014
$249
MSR Hubba Hubba NX 2P
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (3)
MSR
Hubba Hubba NX 2P
reviewed Aug 13, 2014
$390
Hilleberg Staika
user rating: 4 of 5 (6)
Hilleberg
Staika
reviewed Aug 13, 2014
$895
 
user rating: 5 of 5 (9)
Quest
Preying Mantis 4S
reviewed Aug 12, 2014
Amok Draumr
user rating: 4 of 5 (1)

Amok Draumr
reviewed Aug 11, 2014
Terra Nova Ultra Quasar
user rating: 5 of 5 (10)
Terra Nova
Ultra Quasar
reviewed Aug 8, 2014
$780
Big Agnes Lynx Pass 4
user rating: 3.5 of 5 (2)
Big Agnes
Lynx Pass 4
reviewed Aug 7, 2014
$320 MSRP
The North Face Tadpole 23
user rating: 3.5 of 5 (51)
The North Face
Tadpole 23
reviewed Aug 7, 2014
$199 MSRP
Eureka! Apex 3XT
user rating: 4 of 5 (1)
Eureka!
Apex 3XT
reviewed Aug 7, 2014
$210 MSRP
REI Kingdom 6 Tent
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (5)
REI
Kingdom 6 Tent
reviewed Aug 6, 2014
$439
 
user rating: 3.5 of 5 (29)
Northwest Territory
16' x 14' Extreme Vacation Home
reviewed Aug 6, 2014
discontinued
LightHeart Gear Solo
user rating: 5 of 5 (6)
LightHeart Gear
Solo
reviewed Aug 5, 2014
$245 MSRP
Big Agnes Tensleep Station 6
user rating: 5 of 5 (2)
Big Agnes
Tensleep Station 6
reviewed Aug 2, 2014
$450 - $469
Big Agnes Seedhouse SL2
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (16)
Big Agnes
Seedhouse SL2
reviewed Aug 2, 2014
$296 - $349
Grand Trunk Ultralight Hammock
user rating: 4 of 5 (7)
Grand Trunk
Ultralight Hammock
reviewed Aug 1, 2014
$30
The North Face Canyonlands
user rating: 4 of 5 (10)
The North Face
Canyonlands
reviewed Jul 30, 2014
discontinued
Sierra Designs Zeta 2
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (3)
Sierra Designs
Zeta 2
reviewed Jul 30, 2014
$200 MSRP
 
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (1)
REI
Dash 2 Tent
reviewed Jul 30, 2014
$349
 
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (5)
Quest
Viper
reviewed Jul 29, 2014
Wenzel Current
user rating: 3 of 5 (1)
Wenzel
Current
reviewed Jul 29, 2014
Eagles Nest Outfitters SlapStrap
user rating: 3 of 5 (4)
Eagles Nest Outfitters
SlapStrap
reviewed Jul 28, 2014
$18 - $19
NEMO Meta 1P
user rating: 4 of 5 (7)
NEMO
Meta 1P
reviewed Jul 28, 2014
$330 MSRP
Sierra Designs Flashlight 2
user rating: 2 of 5 (1)
Sierra Designs
Flashlight 2
reviewed Jul 27, 2014
$260 - $359
Eureka! Pinnacle Pass 3XTA
user rating: 4 of 5 (7)
Eureka!
Pinnacle Pass 3XTA
reviewed Jul 26, 2014
discontinued
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What’s the “best” tent or shelter for you? Consider your personal outdoor needs, preferences, and budget:

  • Conditions:
    First, and most important, in what seasons, conditions, and terrain will you use your tent, tarp, or hammock? Choose a shelter that can handle the conditions you expect to encounter (rain, snow, wind, heat, humidity, biting insects, an energetic scout troop), but don’t buy more tent than you truly need, and don’t expect one tent to do it all.
  • Capacity:
    Tents are typically classified by sleeping capacity (i.e. one-person, two-person, etc). However, a tent's stated sleeping capacity usually does not include much (or any) space for your gear and there’s no sizing standard between tent manufacturers. Some users size up.
  • Livability:
    Will you use the tent as a basecamp or is it an emergency shelter only? To determine if you and your gear will fit, look at the shelter’s dimensions, including floor and vestibule square areas, height and headroom (including at the sides), plus the number and placement of doors, gear lofts, and pockets, to assess personal livability, comfort, and footprint.
  • Weight and Packed Size:
    If you’ll be backpacking, climbing, cycling, or otherwise carrying that shelter, consider its weight, packed size (and your pack it needs to fit in), and its space-to-weight ratio before automatically opting for the bigger tent. Paddlers and car campers have more room to work with, but everyone should consider how the tent and its parts pack up for stowage.
  • Design:
    Tents come in various designs. Freestanding tents can stand alone without stakes or guy lines and can be easily moved or have dirt and other debris shaken out without being disassembled, though they still need to be staked out. Rounded, geodesic domes are stable and able to withstand heavy snow loads and wind. Tunnel tents are narrow and rectangular, and large family cabin tents are best for warm-weather campground outings.
  • Other features and specs to consider include single versus double-wall, ease of setup, stability, weather resistance, ventilation, , and any noteworthy features.
  • Read more in our guide to tents.