Tents and Shelters

Ready for a night out? Whether you’re an ultralight alpinist, family of backpackers, devoted hanger, or comfort camper, you'll find the best tents, tarps, and hammocks for your outdoor overnights right here.

Check out our top picks below—including price comparisons—to shelter you in any terrain, trip, or season: winter mountaineering, three-season thru-hiking, warm weather car camping, hammock hanging, alpine bivys, tarps, and emergency shelter.

Or you can browse our thousands of independent tent and shelter ratings and reviews by product type, brand, or price. Written by real-world hikers, backpackers, alpinists, climbers, and paddlers, Trailspace community reviews will help you select a dependable, field-tested, outdoor abode just right for your next adventure.

Learn more about how to choose a tent/shelter below »

Category

Four-Season
3-4 Season Convertible
Three-Season
Warm Weather
Bivy Sacks
Tarps and Shelters
Hammocks
Bug Nets
Accessories

Brands

Sierra Designs
Eureka!
Marmot
Stephenson's Warmlite
Big Agnes
Sea to Summit
Slumberjack
Therm-a-Rest
Borah Gear
ZPacks

User

Unisex
Men's
Kids'

Price

less than $25
$25 - $49.99
$50 - $99.99
$100 - $199.99
$200 - $299.99
$300 - $399.99
$400 - $499.99
$500 and above

Recent Tent/Shelter Reviews

Sierra Designs Lookout

rated 4 of 5 stars Had my Lookout since 1996. Lots of use for backcountry paddling and backpacking. The Lookout has served me well in the 22 seasons I have owned it. A slightly crooked pole hasn't stopped this tent from performing. I gave it a bath a couple seasons ago and it was DIRTY!! but still holding strong from weather of all kinds. I have actually used this as a 4 season tent. From deep snow and cold to hot and humid. You don't want to stay in too long in the sun as it heats up quite quickly with the fly on. Full review

Eureka! Zeus 2EXO

rated 3 of 5 stars Good tent. Needs a rain fly. I used this tent several time in the mountains in CA and CO. It took me about five times to realize that if you sleep head-in vs head-by-the door, it vents your breath through the ceiling vent over your head—no condensation problem.  That worked fine until last time camping in all night constant rain for the first time. I am not sure if it leaked or if the rain sealed the ventilation in the surface, but it was like sleeping in drizzling rain inside the tent. I am… Full review

Marmot Limelight 3P

rated 5 of 5 stars I don't normally take the time to write reviews, but I have to for this tent. Perfect tent for avid back country travelers to weekend warriors. Tent is functional, durable, and easy to set up. I've been using/abusing it for 8 years and the tent is going strong like it was its first campout. Highly recommended. This tent is the real deal and has made me a Marmot tent customer for life (much respect to Mountain Hardwear though). I've thought of every possible way to give this tent 4.5 stars, and I… Full review

Stephenson's Warmlite 2R

rated 5 of 5 stars Great tent. I got my first 2R Stephenson tent around 1974. Did several trips to the Grand Teton, up to the Canadian Rockies and then down to Peru. It was lightweight and stood up great in some wild windy snowy weather at high altitudes.  On the saddle between the Grand and Middle Teton one time, the winds shredded two lady climbers' tent and they had to join us. Our tent held great, while it was cramped for four.  Unfortunately, my tent did not hold up too well after I got married and my son… Full review

Big Agnes Seedhouse SL1

rated 1 of 5 stars This tent is a piece of garbage. I'm confident I could craft a better shelter out of rope and tarp. I can't for the life of me figure why Big Agnes hails this tent as their claim to fame in the tent world. This is by far the worst tent I have ever used, much less owned. Big Agnes makes some decent gear, especially their sleeping bags, but the Seedhouse is a big middle finger to their customers. For a one-man tent the setup process is okay, and relatively quick, but they could have thought it out… Full review

Sea to Summit Hammock Bug Net

rated 5 of 5 stars An awesome product. Versatile, easy to put on, and allows for great visibility. Well designed and well executed. Definitely a product worth checking out if you're a hammock user looking for a standalone bugnet. This review is a part of a review of the entire Sea to Summit Hammock System. Please refer to my Sea to Summit Ultralight Hammock review to see the full review of the Ultralight Hammock and its components. Most of the information below is just separated out here again for visibility purposes. Full review

Sea to Summit Hammock Tarp

rated 4 of 5 stars A great tarp, though a little on the minimalist side. Looking to go lighter? This may be the tarp for you. This review is a part of a review of the entire Sea to Summit Hammock System. Please refer to my Sea to Summit Ultralight Hammock review to see the full review of the Ultralight Hammock and its components. Most of the information below is just separated out here again for visibility purposes. Hammock Tarp: The Hammock Tarp is made of Ultra-Sil Nano 15D Nylon fabric, which provides a high… Full review

Slumberjack Sightline 1

rated 4 of 5 stars Good tent for backpacking trips. Stores relatively small and lightweight. I used this tent for a backpacking trip in the Tetons. The tent worked well and kept me dry the entire time. Even through a large thunderstorm, the tent withstood hail and rain along with heavy winds with no issue at all. The tent had plenty of room for me and my 70L pack. The tent is easy to pitch and easy to pack up. The only downside was the bag ripped after our trip. However the company sent me a new bag within a few days. Full review

Therm-a-Rest Slacker Snuggler

rated 4.5 of 5 stars The Slacker Snuggler is a great little underquilt. I think it’s a perfect fit for hanging in summer, late spring, and early fall. Retailing at $79.95, it is much more expensive than CCF pads and a bit heavier, but much more comfortable. The Snuggler is about half the cost of similarly rated down quilts, but easier to use and maintain. The Slacker Snuggler came without any instructions, and there are no instructions for use or care on the Therm-a-Rest website; an insert of some variety showing… Full review

Top-Rated Tents and Shelters

Sort by: name | rating | price | availability | recently reviewed

 
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (7)
Sierra Designs Lookout reviewed Jul 24, 2017
discontinued
user rating: 3 of 5 (27)
Eureka! Zeus 2EXO reviewed Jul 22, 2017
discontinued
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (22)
Marmot Limelight 3P reviewed Jul 21, 2017
$225 - $299
user rating: 5 of 5 (7)
Stephenson's Warmlite 2R reviewed Jul 16, 2017
user rating: 4 of 5 (24)
Big Agnes Seedhouse SL1 reviewed Jul 15, 2017
$300
user rating: 5 of 5 (1)
Sea to Summit Hammock Bug Net reviewed Jul 13, 2017
$70
user rating: 4 of 5 (1)
Sea to Summit Hammock Tarp reviewed Jul 13, 2017
$150
user rating: 4 of 5 (1)
Slumberjack Sightline 1 reviewed Jul 10, 2017
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (1)
Therm-a-Rest Slacker Snuggler reviewed Jul 10, 2017
$80
user rating: 5 of 5 (1)
Borah Gear Side Zip Ultralight Bivy reviewed Jul 9, 2017
user rating: 3 of 5 (5)
Eureka! Tetragon 1610 reviewed Jul 8, 2017
$280 MSRP
user rating: 3.5 of 5 (1)
Sea to Summit Ultralight Hammock reviewed Jul 8, 2017
$90
user rating: 5 of 5 (1)
ZPacks Duplex Tent reviewed Jul 6, 2017
$599 MSRP
user rating: 4 of 5 (2)
Big Agnes Ripple Creek UL2+ mtnGLO reviewed Jul 6, 2017
user rating: 4 of 5 (1)
Outdoor Vitals Aerie 20°F Down Underquilt reviewed Jul 6, 2017
$160 MSRP
user rating: 4 of 5 (7)
Outdoor Research Alpine Bivy reviewed Jul 6, 2017
$245 - $249
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (1)
Big Agnes Copper Spur HV UL2 reviewed Jul 6, 2017
$450 - $499
user rating: 3 of 5 (1)
Grand Trunk Ultralight Travel Hammock reviewed Jul 6, 2017
user rating: 5 of 5 (1)
Clam Quick-Set Escape reviewed Jul 6, 2017
$300 MSRP
user rating: 4 of 5 (1)
Marmot Catalyst 3P reviewed Jul 5, 2017
$178 - $229
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (4)
ALPS Mountaineering Lynx 2 AL reviewed Jul 5, 2017
$112
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (18)
REI Half Dome 2 Plus reviewed Jul 1, 2017
$219
user rating: 4 of 5 (1)
Tentsile Flite+ Tree Tent reviewed Jun 30, 2017
$350 - $380
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (13)
NEMO Losi 3P reviewed Jun 30, 2017
$450 MSRP
user rating: 4 of 5 (2)
MSR Hubba NX reviewed Jun 29, 2017
$350 - $399
user rating: 4 of 5 (2)
ALPS Mountaineering Extreme 3 Outfitter reviewed Jun 29, 2017
$320 MSRP
user rating: 5 of 5 (2)
Six Moon Designs Skyscape Scout reviewed Jun 29, 2017
$125 MSRP
 
user rating: 4 of 5 (1)
Marmot Limelight 6P reviewed Jun 27, 2017
user rating: 5 of 5 (16)
Eagles Nest Outfitters Atlas Straps reviewed Jun 27, 2017
$22 - $29
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (7)
Eagles Nest Outfitters ProFly Rain Tarp reviewed Jun 27, 2017
$56 - $79
 
user rating: 3.5 of 5 (85)
Northwest Territory Vacation Home 10-Person Tent 14' x 14' reviewed Jun 27, 2017
$250 MSRP
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (4)
Mountain Hardwear Approach reviewed Jun 24, 2017
discontinued
user rating: 2.5 of 5 (1)
NEMO Galaxi 2P reviewed Jun 22, 2017
$250
user rating: 4 of 5 (8)
ALPS Mountaineering Chaos 3 reviewed Jun 22, 2017
$200 - $231
user rating: 4 of 5 (3)
ALPS Mountaineering Summit Tent reviewed Jun 22, 2017
$60 - $119
user rating: 5 of 5 (2)
Tarptent Moment DW reviewed Jun 22, 2017
$285 MSRP
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (9)
Big Agnes Big House 6 reviewed Jun 21, 2017
$360 MSRP
user rating: 5 of 5 (1)
Eureka! Suite V6 reviewed Jun 21, 2017
$290 MSRP
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (3)
Eureka! Timberline SQ 4XT reviewed Jun 20, 2017
$300
user rating: 3 of 5 (1)
Kelty Gunnison 2.3 reviewed Jun 17, 2017
$200
user rating: 4 of 5 (7)
ALPS Mountaineering Zephyr 1 reviewed Jun 16, 2017
$130 - $199
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (1)
Naturehike Cycling Ultralight Silicone One Man Tent reviewed Jun 16, 2017
user rating: 5 of 5 (1)
ALPS Mountaineering Meramac 3 reviewed Jun 16, 2017
$104 - $129
user rating: 4 of 5 (4)
NEMO Hornet 2P reviewed Jun 16, 2017
$370
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (9)
Kelty Salida 2 reviewed Jun 16, 2017
$125 - $169
user rating: 5 of 5 (2)
REI Quarter Dome 1 reviewed Jun 15, 2017
$279
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (5)
ALPS Mountaineering Lynx 1 reviewed Jun 14, 2017
$84
 
user rating: 2 of 5 (31)
Ozark Trail Tent reviewed Jun 14, 2017
discontinued
 
user rating: 3.5 of 5 (35)
Northwest Territory 16' x 14' Extreme Vacation Home reviewed Jun 13, 2017
discontinued
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (7)
Marmot Thor 2P reviewed Jun 11, 2017
$519 - $649
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What’s the “best” tent or shelter for you? Consider your personal outdoor needs, preferences, and budget:

  • Conditions:
    First, and most important, in what seasons, conditions, and terrain will you use your tent, tarp, or hammock? Choose a shelter that can handle the conditions you expect to encounter (rain, snow, wind, heat, humidity, biting insects, an energetic scout troop), but don’t buy more tent than you truly need, and don’t expect one tent to do it all.
  • Capacity:
    Tents are typically classified by sleeping capacity (i.e. one-person, two-person, etc). However, a tent's stated sleeping capacity usually does not include much (or any) space for your gear and there’s no sizing standard between tent manufacturers. Some users size up.
  • Livability:
    Will you use the tent as a basecamp or is it an emergency shelter only? To determine if you and your gear will fit, look at the shelter’s dimensions, including floor and vestibule square areas, height and headroom (including at the sides), plus the number and placement of doors, gear lofts, and pockets, to assess personal livability, comfort, and footprint.
  • Weight and Packed Size:
    If you’ll be backpacking, climbing, cycling, or otherwise carrying that shelter, consider its weight, packed size (and your pack it needs to fit in), and its space-to-weight ratio before automatically opting for the bigger tent. Paddlers and car campers have more room to work with, but everyone should consider how the tent and its parts pack up for stowage.
  • Design:
    Tents come in various designs. Freestanding tents can stand alone without stakes or guy lines and can be easily moved or have dirt and other debris shaken out without being disassembled, though they still need to be staked out. Rounded, geodesic domes are stable and able to withstand heavy snow loads and wind. Tunnel tents are narrow and rectangular, and large family cabin tents are best for warm-weather campground outings.
  • Other features and specs to consider include single versus double-wall, ease of setup, stability, weather resistance, ventilation, , and any noteworthy features.
  • Read more in our guide to tents.