Tents and Shelters

Ready for a night out? Whether you’re an ultralight alpinist, family of backpackers, devoted hanger, or comfort camper, you'll find the best tents, tarps, and hammocks for your outdoor overnights right here.

Check out our top picks below—including price comparisons—to shelter you in any terrain, trip, or season: winter mountaineering, three-season thru-hiking, warm weather car camping, hammock hanging, alpine bivys, tarps, and emergency shelter.

Or you can browse our thousands of independent tent and shelter ratings and reviews by product type, brand, or price. Written by real-world hikers, backpackers, alpinists, climbers, and paddlers, Trailspace community reviews will help you select a dependable, field-tested, outdoor abode just right for your next adventure.

Learn more about how to choose a tent/shelter below »

Categories

Four-Season
3-4 Season Convertible
Three-Season
Warm Weather
Bivy Sacks
Tarps and Shelters
Hammocks
Accessories

Brands

Eureka!
The North Face
Big Agnes
Marmot
EMS
Ozark Trail
LightHeart Gear
NEMO
Clark
other

Price

less than $25
$25 - $49.99
$50 - $99.99
$100 - $199.99
$200 - $299.99
$300 - $399.99
$400 - $499.99
$500 and above

Recent Tent/Shelter Reviews

Eureka! Timberline 4

rated 5 of 5 stars Great motorcycle/car/canoe tent have had mine for over 20 years. A few years back I got a Timberline 6. Don't like it nearly as well the extra height makes it much slower to set up. I have had a Timberline 4 since 1987. Camped in all kinds of weather way wetter and colder than I would now. It always performed well. Just watch placement. Don't set up so wind is blowing in your fly. It is a great all around work horse. It may not be the best at any one thing, but it does a lot well. Setup is easy… Full review

The North Face Flint 2

rated 5 of 5 stars Simple, well-made. The most important word describing this tent has been omitted. FREESTANDING. No stakes needed. Try driving stakes in the Rocky Mountain West. They will come out about the same time the coyotes do: 2 a.m. I own a few freestanding tents, will never buy anything else. Full review

Big Agnes Fly Creek UL2

rated 5 of 5 stars Excellent ultralight shelter that does what it is intended for. I am a Master Registered Maine Guide and enjoy extreme backpack hunts in Alaska/Canada that test equipment and one's endurance. I subjected this ultra-light tent to a SE Alaska backpack goat hunting trip ... something it was not exactly manufactured for. I am 5'9" 150 lbs  and used the UL2 — gave me just enough room for gear/pack/gun and food lasting 7 days.  Would not have wanted more room, or another person in the tent! Just… Full review

Marmot Earlylight 2P

rated 2 of 5 stars High expectations, disappointing results. I have been canoe tripping and wilderness hiking for 33 years and needed a new reasonably lightweight two-person tent. When I purchased the Marmot Earlylight I was expecting a better quality tent. It certainly is a higher quality tent than a Kelty or a Eureka brand, but that isn't saying much. After a little practice this tent is easy to set up. The fly doesn't extend too far from the main body, which makes it easy to set up in tight wilderness locations. Full review

EMS Velocity 1 Tent

rated 5 of 5 stars Great tent for when you have to sleep alone. I bought this tent to add to my backpacking arsenal because I was tired of carrying around a 2-person tent when most times I end up going solo. By doing so I shed over 2 lbs and reduced the volume it took up in my pack. It is only available at EMS as it's their store branded product. SO if you are not near an EMS and unable to review a unit before purchase that might be an important consideration. (I strongly recommend seeing a demo or at least a packaged… Full review

Ozark Trail 2-Person Junior Dome Tent

rated 5 of 5 stars I use this tent for bicycle camping — works well — threw the zippered bag away to reduce weight. Here is a trick I have learned along the way — I bought oversized foil emergency blankets (2" x 3" x .75" folded package) and use them for footprint under tent, @ $1 each on E-bay I just wad it up and throw it away after each use.  Keeps tent bottom clean. Full review

LightHeart Gear Duo

rated 5 of 5 stars Best tent I have ever owned. I completed a thru hike of the Appalachian Trail with this tent and was very pleased. Very light tent that packs up small, fit in outer pocket of my backpack. I slept in this tent for six months almost every night with no problems. I set it up in the rain, sleet, and high wind and never got wet. To say the least I did not treat this tent very kind but it held up great. Full review

NEMO Morpho 1P

rated 0.5 of 5 stars Since it is a single wall style tent these types are prone to condensation problems. On some cool mornings it was like a rainstorm had opened up inside the tent. The air bladder style poles would take 30 minutes or more to pump up with enough air to support the tent. It was also a heavy and bulky tent for its size. I would NOT recommend this tent for any reason. The tent was purchased for cycle camping but proved to be a poor choice in waterproofness, setup, and weight. The air bladder poles took… Full review

Clark North American

rated 4 of 5 stars I would recommend this to all people backpacking in harsh conditions. I got the standard sized tarp, but would recommend a larger tarp to stake out for cooking and such. I have used this in 70 to below 30 degree weather. I have found it warm, dry, and comfortable in all conditions. I would like to know how well it works on the ground, and have heard you can set it up that way. I pack my sleeping bag inside the hammock for drier set up and quicker set up. This is the easiest hammock I have had to… Full review

Top-Rated Tents and Shelters

Sort by: name | rating | price | availability | recently reviewed

user rating: 4.5 of 5 (16)
Eureka! Timberline 4 reviewed Dec 15, 2014
$170 - $189
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (7)
The North Face Flint 2 reviewed Dec 15, 2014
$149 MSRP
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (17)
Big Agnes Fly Creek UL2 reviewed Dec 14, 2014
$370 - $389
user rating: 3.5 of 5 (8)
Marmot Earlylight 2P reviewed Dec 13, 2014
$229
user rating: 5 of 5 (2)
EMS Velocity 1 Tent reviewed Dec 12, 2014
$215
user rating: 3 of 5 (35)
Ozark Trail 2-Person Junior Dome Tent reviewed Dec 5, 2014
$23 MSRP
user rating: 4 of 5 (3)
LightHeart Gear Duo reviewed Dec 5, 2014
$295 MSRP
user rating: 3 of 5 (3)
NEMO Morpho 1P reviewed Dec 5, 2014
$400
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (5)
Clark North American reviewed Dec 2, 2014
$359 MSRP
user rating: 4 of 5 (4)
Eureka! Spitfire 2 reviewed Dec 2, 2014
$120 - $137
user rating: 4 of 5 (11)
Eureka! Backcountry 2 reviewed Dec 1, 2014
discontinued
user rating: 3.5 of 5 (1)
Jeep 3-Room Screen Combo Dome Tent reviewed Nov 26, 2014
user rating: 4 of 5 (1)
Marmot Nusku 2P reviewed Nov 23, 2014
$449 MSRP
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (9)
Mountain Hardwear Lightpath 2 reviewed Nov 21, 2014
$175 MSRP
user rating: 4 of 5 (2)
Coleman Hooligan 2 reviewed Nov 21, 2014
$60
user rating: 5 of 5 (3)
Mountain Hardwear Taurine 2 reviewed Nov 21, 2014
discontinued
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (4)
Tarptent Double Rainbow reviewed Nov 21, 2014
$260 MSRP
user rating: 4 of 5 (1)
VauDe Campo XT 5 reviewed Nov 20, 2014
$315 - $359
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (1)
Big Agnes Burn Ridge Outfitter 2 reviewed Nov 19, 2014
$150 - $199
 
user rating: 4 of 5 (3)
Cabela's Alaskan Guide 8-Man reviewed Nov 18, 2014
user rating: 4 of 5 (7)
Big Agnes Fly Creek UL1 reviewed Nov 18, 2014
$320 - $329
user rating: 5 of 5 (1)
Sierra Madre Research Pares reviewed Nov 18, 2014
$85 MSRP
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (26)
Eureka! Spitfire 1 reviewed Nov 16, 2014
$100 - $109
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (12)
ALPS Mountaineering Zephyr 2.0 reviewed Nov 16, 2014
$130 - $219
 
user rating: 5 of 5 (7)
Walrus Skyline reviewed Nov 13, 2014
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (14)
Kelty Noah's Tarp 12 reviewed Nov 9, 2014
$70 - $99
user rating: 3.5 of 5 (4)
Kelty TN2 reviewed Nov 8, 2014
$250
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (13)
Eureka! Alpine Meadows reviewed Nov 7, 2014
discontinued
user rating: 4 of 5 (1)
Wiggy's Freedom Shelter reviewed Nov 7, 2014
$350 MSRP
user rating: 4 of 5 (2)
Exped Orion reviewed Nov 6, 2014
$609
user rating: 3 of 5 (6)
Mountain Hardwear Haven 2 reviewed Nov 4, 2014
discontinued
user rating: 2.5 of 5 (2)
REI Kingdom 4 Tent reviewed Nov 3, 2014
$389
user rating: 5 of 5 (1)
Hennessy Hammock Hyperlite Asym Zip reviewed Nov 3, 2014
$260
user rating: 5 of 5 (7)
The North Face Himalayan Hotel reviewed Nov 2, 2014
discontinued
user rating: 4 of 5 (1)
ALPS Mountaineering Jagged Peak 2 reviewed Oct 26, 2014
user rating: 5 of 5 (1)
DD Hammocks Tarp 3x3 reviewed Oct 22, 2014
user rating: 4 of 5 (6)
Mountain Hardwear Drifter 3 reviewed Oct 21, 2014
$285
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (2)
LightHeart Gear SoLong 6 reviewed Oct 21, 2014
$298 MSRP
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (19)
Eureka! Timberline 2 reviewed Oct 19, 2014
$120 - $149
user rating: 4 of 5 (1)
Big Agnes Lone Spring 3 reviewed Oct 18, 2014
$189 - $269
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (4)
Kelty Grand Mesa 4 reviewed Oct 17, 2014
$192 - $239
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (2)
Tarptent Scarp 2 reviewed Oct 16, 2014
$355 MSRP
user rating: 5 of 5 (1)
Coleman Hooligan 4 Tent reviewed Oct 15, 2014
$116 MSRP
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (8)
Big Agnes Copper Spur UL1 reviewed Oct 14, 2014
$350 - $369
user rating: 5 of 5 (1)
Mountain Hardwear Direkt 2 reviewed Oct 14, 2014
$500 - $550
user rating: 4 of 5 (3)
Outdoor Research Aurora Bivy reviewed Oct 12, 2014
$200
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (22)
Marmot Limelight 2P reviewed Oct 11, 2014
$197 - $253
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (6)
Mountainsmith Morrison 2 reviewed Oct 10, 2014
$162
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (15)
Marmot Limelight 3P reviewed Oct 9, 2014
$279
user rating: 4 of 5 (8)
Grand Trunk Ultralight Hammock reviewed Oct 9, 2014
$30
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What’s the “best” tent or shelter for you? Consider your personal outdoor needs, preferences, and budget:

  • Conditions:
    First, and most important, in what seasons, conditions, and terrain will you use your tent, tarp, or hammock? Choose a shelter that can handle the conditions you expect to encounter (rain, snow, wind, heat, humidity, biting insects, an energetic scout troop), but don’t buy more tent than you truly need, and don’t expect one tent to do it all.
  • Capacity:
    Tents are typically classified by sleeping capacity (i.e. one-person, two-person, etc). However, a tent's stated sleeping capacity usually does not include much (or any) space for your gear and there’s no sizing standard between tent manufacturers. Some users size up.
  • Livability:
    Will you use the tent as a basecamp or is it an emergency shelter only? To determine if you and your gear will fit, look at the shelter’s dimensions, including floor and vestibule square areas, height and headroom (including at the sides), plus the number and placement of doors, gear lofts, and pockets, to assess personal livability, comfort, and footprint.
  • Weight and Packed Size:
    If you’ll be backpacking, climbing, cycling, or otherwise carrying that shelter, consider its weight, packed size (and your pack it needs to fit in), and its space-to-weight ratio before automatically opting for the bigger tent. Paddlers and car campers have more room to work with, but everyone should consider how the tent and its parts pack up for stowage.
  • Design:
    Tents come in various designs. Freestanding tents can stand alone without stakes or guy lines and can be easily moved or have dirt and other debris shaken out without being disassembled, though they still need to be staked out. Rounded, geodesic domes are stable and able to withstand heavy snow loads and wind. Tunnel tents are narrow and rectangular, and large family cabin tents are best for warm-weather campground outings.
  • Other features and specs to consider include single versus double-wall, ease of setup, stability, weather resistance, ventilation, , and any noteworthy features.
  • Read more in our guide to tents.