Tents and Shelters

Ready for a night out? Whether you’re an ultralight alpinist, family of backpackers, devoted hanger, or comfort camper, you'll find the best tents, tarps, and hammocks for your outdoor overnights right here.

Check out our top picks below—including price comparisons—to shelter you in any terrain, trip, or season: winter mountaineering, three-season thru-hiking, warm weather car camping, hammock hanging, alpine bivys, tarps, and emergency shelter.

Or you can browse our thousands of independent tent and shelter ratings and reviews by product type, brand, or price. Written by real-world hikers, backpackers, alpinists, climbers, and paddlers, Trailspace community reviews will help you select a dependable, field-tested, outdoor abode just right for your next adventure.

Learn more about how to choose a tent/shelter below »

Category

Four-Season
3-4 Season Convertible
Three-Season
Warm Weather
Bivy Sacks
Tarps and Shelters
Hammocks
Bug Nets
Accessories

Brands

Marmot
Wild River
Mountain Hardwear
MSR
Dutchware
Coleman
Out Gear Recreation
Nite Ize
Eureka!
DD Hammocks

User

Unisex
Kids'

Price

less than $25
$25 - $49.99
$50 - $99.99
$100 - $199.99
$200 - $299.99
$300 - $399.99
$400 - $499.99
$500 and above

Recent Tent/Shelter Reviews

Marmot Thor 2P

rated 2 of 5 stars Dissapointed Two months ago I bought Thor 3P and last weekend we finally took it with us outdoors. On the very first night (and because of the incident the only night) wind broke three poles and dramatically contorted the rest. We assembled Tent with entrance directed toward the wind, stretched it to the some degree and added 8 guy lines fixed with MSR blizzard stakes and ice axes assuming possibility of wind conditions to be changed. At the morning the wind strengthened to 20 meters per second. Full review

Marmot Pulsar 2P

rated 3.5 of 5 stars Some great things about this tent and some pretty lousy things about this tent make it a split decision. Setup: The tent is easy enough to pitch. There are two poles with segmented parts. You insert the end of the pole into the grommet in each corner. I don't have the footprint. The fly has hook clips that fit over guy cords at the corners of the tent (see pic). The fly has (had) some underside velcro straps that are supposed to hold the fly to the poles in case of inclement weather. Unfortunately,… Full review

Wild River B-487UWF 3-Man

rated 5 of 5 stars This is a vintage product that is extremely lightweight for its size (8x10) and easy to set up. Good for backpacking. I've had this tent for many years (I think I got it in the late '70s) and for the last 20 years it has been rolled up in my garage. I recently took it out and it's like new other than a faded streak along one edge. I can't find any info on the web regarding Wild River products so hopefully someone will know something about them. I've backpacked in the mountains with it and it performed… Full review

Mountain Hardwear Haven 3

rated 2 of 5 stars Rain fly never fit correctly and the zipper seams eventually fell apart. Except for that I really liked the design of the tent We used the heck out of this tent for several years and many long trips. The rain fly never fit correctly. This was clearly a design and engineering flaw. After a few years the zipper adhesive and stitching on the rain fly came apart completely, despite my efforts at repair. I contacted Mountain Hardwear about this and eventually sent the tent back to them. They gave me… Full review

MSR ToughStake

rated 3 of 5 stars The odds strongly favor the possibility that the manufacturer of the awesome bomb-shelter tent you bought skimped on the stakes to save cost and weight. Therefore you'll be needing a few more decent ones to get the job done. Consider these if your winter trips (or sand camping I assume) tend to be in pack-able snow.  MSR Toughstake I tested these stakes along with a four-season MSR Remote 2 tent.  Regular stakes do practically NOTHING for you in snow when the wind comes. If you are in deep snow… Full review

Dutchware ARGON Vented Sock

rated 5 of 5 stars I borrowed it from a friend and used it in 20°F weather. It really helped block the chill and was toasty in my 20°F bag with 40°F UQ. Used it to supplement my base winter gear. It really helped block out the wind and keep the chill out.  Full review

Coleman Hooligan 2

rated 4 of 5 stars Easy to set up and easy to tear down. I got this tent for car camping not backpacking as it is too heavy for backpacking. Very easy to set up by one person. Stuffing it back in the carry bag required a little finessing, but it will go. Plenty of room for a queen size air mattress and gear. I like that you can remove the rain fly for stargazing. Full review

Out Gear Recreation Singled Out Hammock

rated 5 of 5 stars All around everyday hammock! I take this thing everywhere with me and compared to the competition, including price, quality of material, ease of use, and design it is the same or better on many levels. The straps and hammock all fit into one small package, easily manageable on day hikes, just chillin' or relaxing, or even summer camping! This is a must buy and is extremely comfortable! If you've never laid in one of these you'll definitely be pleasantly surprised!  Full review

Nite Ize Figure 9 Carabiner

rated 4 of 5 stars A tarp camper's friend. These work great for quick tarp setups. Lunch breaks in the rain, late evening campsites, you need a tarp up quick, use these. On a cold, after sundown camp setup my fingers having been in the rain all day would not have been capable of tying good knots in the dark. These little babies allowed my tired self the quick setup that I so wanted. Purists may scoff, but I have an older friend, a WW2 vet, who scoffs at modern climbing hardware. He tells tales of major climbs using… Full review

Top-Rated Tents and Shelters

Sort by: name | rating | price | availability | recently reviewed

user rating: 4 of 5 (8)
Marmot Thor 2P reviewed Mar 30, 2017
$519 - $648
user rating: 3.5 of 5 (1)
Marmot Pulsar 2P reviewed Mar 25, 2017
user rating: 5 of 5 (1)
Wild River B-487UWF 3-Man reviewed Mar 23, 2017
discontinued
user rating: 2.5 of 5 (9)
Mountain Hardwear Haven 3 reviewed Mar 14, 2017
discontinued
user rating: 3 of 5 (1)
MSR ToughStake reviewed Mar 14, 2017
$40 - $49
user rating: 5 of 5 (2)
Dutchware ARGON Vented Sock reviewed Mar 14, 2017
$57 MSRP
user rating: 4 of 5 (3)
Coleman Hooligan 2 reviewed Mar 13, 2017
$53
user rating: 5 of 5 (2)
Out Gear Recreation Singled Out Hammock reviewed Mar 13, 2017
$70 MSRP
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (3)
Nite Ize Figure 9 Carabiner reviewed Mar 12, 2017
$3 - $10
user rating: 3.5 of 5 (51)
Eureka! Solitaire reviewed Mar 8, 2017
$72 - $89
user rating: 4 of 5 (1)
DD Hammocks DD Superlight Hammock reviewed Mar 2, 2017
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (1)
Aqua Quest Safari Sil Tarp Square reviewed Feb 28, 2017
$130 MSRP
user rating: 4 of 5 (8)
Mountain Hardwear Sprite 1 reviewed Feb 26, 2017
$160 MSRP
user rating: 4 of 5 (1)
Therm-a-Rest Cot Tent reviewed Feb 23, 2017
$195 - $259
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (4)
Mountain Hardwear Space Station reviewed Feb 20, 2017
$4,400 - $5,500
user rating: 4 of 5 (6)
Tarptent Notch reviewed Feb 19, 2017
$259 MSRP
user rating: 3.5 of 5 (6)
Bibler Tempest reviewed Feb 18, 2017
discontinued
user rating: 5 of 5 (1)
Dutchware Hexon 1.6 Fabric reviewed Feb 17, 2017
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (10)
Kelty Noah's Tarp 9 reviewed Feb 17, 2017
$60
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (15)
Hennessy Hammock Ultralight Backpacker Asym reviewed Feb 15, 2017
$250
user rating: 5 of 5 (1)
Moss Tents Hooped Outland reviewed Feb 6, 2017
discontinued
user rating: 3 of 5 (2)
The North Face Meso 2 reviewed Feb 6, 2017
$259 MSRP
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (1)
Fjallraven Abisko Lite 3 reviewed Jan 31, 2017
user rating: 4 of 5 (2)
Marmot Thor 3P reviewed Jan 30, 2017
$559 - $698
user rating: 5 of 5 (7)
The North Face VE 24 reviewed Jan 26, 2017
discontinued
user rating: 1 of 5 (3)
The North Face Assault 2 reviewed Jan 25, 2017
$449
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (7)
MSR Carbon Reflex 2 reviewed Jan 19, 2017
$500
Marmot Tungsten 1P reviewed Jan 18, 2017
$143 - $179
NEW!
user rating: 5 of 5 (1)
MSR Remote 2 reviewed Jan 16, 2017
$800
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (2)
Appy Trails Mark V reviewed Jan 14, 2017
$120 MSRP
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (21)
Kelty Gunnison 2 reviewed Jan 11, 2017
$190 MSRP
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (4)
Tarptent Scarp 1 reviewed Jan 9, 2017
$295 MSRP
user rating: 5 of 5 (1)
YAMA Mountain Gear Cirriform Tarp 1P - 0.8 oz Dyneema reviewed Jan 9, 2017
$360 MSRP
user rating: 5 of 5 (4)
The North Face Apogee 24 reviewed Jan 7, 2017
discontinued
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (14)
Marmot Swallow 2P reviewed Jan 6, 2017
discontinued
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (2)
Eureka! Mountain Pass 3XTE reviewed Jan 2, 2017
$270
user rating: 5 of 5 (4)
Sierra Designs Superflash reviewed Dec 28, 2016
discontinued
user rating: 5 of 5 (3)
Kodiak Canvas 10x10 Flex-Bow Canvas Tent Deluxe reviewed Dec 16, 2016
$400
user rating: 3 of 5 (11)
MSR Missing Link reviewed Dec 11, 2016
discontinued
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (3)
ALPS Mountaineering Tasmanian 2 reviewed Dec 9, 2016
$245
user rating: 4 of 5 (10)
Kelty Crestone 1 reviewed Dec 4, 2016
discontinued
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (4)
REI Mountain 3 reviewed Dec 3, 2016
discontinued
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (29)
MSR Hubba reviewed Dec 2, 2016
$250 MSRP
user rating: 4 of 5 (1)
Paha Que' Wilderness Rainfly for Hammock reviewed Nov 29, 2016
user rating: 4 of 5 (1)
Equinox Sprawler Ultralite Bivi reviewed Nov 25, 2016
$63 MSRP
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (1)
SlingFin CrossBow 2 Footprint reviewed Nov 22, 2016
$60 MSRP
user rating: 3.5 of 5 (1)
SlingFin CrossBow 2 Mesh Drop-In reviewed Nov 22, 2016
$90 MSRP
user rating: 4 of 5 (1)
SlingFin CrossBow 2 R/S reviewed Nov 22, 2016
$580 MSRP
user rating: 4 of 5 (1)
SlingFin CrossBow 2 Mesh reviewed Nov 22, 2016
$480 MSRP
user rating: 4 of 5 (1)
SlingFin CrossBow 2 StormPak reviewed Nov 22, 2016
$395 MSRP
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What’s the “best” tent or shelter for you? Consider your personal outdoor needs, preferences, and budget:

  • Conditions:
    First, and most important, in what seasons, conditions, and terrain will you use your tent, tarp, or hammock? Choose a shelter that can handle the conditions you expect to encounter (rain, snow, wind, heat, humidity, biting insects, an energetic scout troop), but don’t buy more tent than you truly need, and don’t expect one tent to do it all.
  • Capacity:
    Tents are typically classified by sleeping capacity (i.e. one-person, two-person, etc). However, a tent's stated sleeping capacity usually does not include much (or any) space for your gear and there’s no sizing standard between tent manufacturers. Some users size up.
  • Livability:
    Will you use the tent as a basecamp or is it an emergency shelter only? To determine if you and your gear will fit, look at the shelter’s dimensions, including floor and vestibule square areas, height and headroom (including at the sides), plus the number and placement of doors, gear lofts, and pockets, to assess personal livability, comfort, and footprint.
  • Weight and Packed Size:
    If you’ll be backpacking, climbing, cycling, or otherwise carrying that shelter, consider its weight, packed size (and your pack it needs to fit in), and its space-to-weight ratio before automatically opting for the bigger tent. Paddlers and car campers have more room to work with, but everyone should consider how the tent and its parts pack up for stowage.
  • Design:
    Tents come in various designs. Freestanding tents can stand alone without stakes or guy lines and can be easily moved or have dirt and other debris shaken out without being disassembled, though they still need to be staked out. Rounded, geodesic domes are stable and able to withstand heavy snow loads and wind. Tunnel tents are narrow and rectangular, and large family cabin tents are best for warm-weather campground outings.
  • Other features and specs to consider include single versus double-wall, ease of setup, stability, weather resistance, ventilation, , and any noteworthy features.
  • Read more in our guide to tents.