Tents and Shelters

Ready for a night out? Whether you’re an ultralight alpinist, family of backpackers, devoted hanger, or comfort camper, you'll find the best tents, tarps, and hammocks for your outdoor overnights right here.

Check out our top picks below—including price comparisons—to shelter you in any terrain, trip, or season: winter mountaineering, three-season thru-hiking, warm weather car camping, hammock hanging, alpine bivys, tarps, and emergency shelter.

Or you can browse our thousands of independent tent and shelter ratings and reviews by product type, brand, or price. Written by real-world hikers, backpackers, alpinists, climbers, and paddlers, Trailspace community reviews will help you select a dependable, field-tested, outdoor abode just right for your next adventure.

Learn more about how to choose a tent/shelter below »

Categories

Four-Season
3-4 Season Convertible
Three-Season
Warm Weather
Bivy Sacks
Tarps and Shelters
Hammocks
Bug Nets
Accessories

Brands

Sierra Designs
Integral Designs
Kelty
Eureka!
ALPS Mountaineering
MSR
Big Agnes
Hillary
No Limits
REI

Genders

Unisex
Men's
Kids'

Price

less than $25
$25 - $49.99
$50 - $99.99
$100 - $199.99
$200 - $299.99
$300 - $399.99
$400 - $499.99
$500 and above

Recent Tent/Shelter Reviews

Sierra Designs Sirius 2

rated 5 of 5 stars Three season tent with plenty of room for two people, or one and all gear. Great for backpackers, car campers, or canoe campers. Best for those looking for a good product at a reasonable price. This is the easiest tent I've ever pitched. The poles all snap together easily, and are all connected in advance so there is no guesswork. The tent snaps easily to the poles, and the fly buckles on. The tent can easily be pitched in under two minutes. The tent has been stable and comfortable both in good… Full review

Integral Designs Unishelter

rated 4 of 5 stars I prefer a tent to a Bivy but this is the best bivy I've ever used! Easy to climb into. Comfortable to read in. Light and packs small. Setup is as simple as it gets with any bivy. The one pole on this guy requires staking for it to be effective but once it's setup, the mesh stays off your face and there is plenty of room for reading comfortably. In warm, heavily mosquito'd areas you can leave the mesh open all night without walking up looking like you have small pox.  Completely waterproof - I've… Full review

Kelty TN2

rated 4 of 5 stars Probably one of the best tents I have ever owned. Easy to set up alone, dry in the wet, no condensation problems at night, and not too heavy. The design is well thought out and there are many great features. My only gripe is that it is not built for anyone taller than 6', as your head/feet will likely touch the front and back of the tent. Probably one of the best tents I have ever owned. Easy to set up alone, dry in the wet, no condensation problems at night, and not too heavy.  The design is well… Full review

Eureka! Mountain Pass 1XT

rated 4 of 5 stars Great small one-person tent. Very packable with short pole sections and it's a tough design! I have had this tent about three years now and it has become my go-to one-man tent. I have hiked many miles with it, been in some really bad storms, and it's always asked for more. I was into the Eureka TCOP military combat tents because they are VERY tough and can handle a snow load. I found this online and bought it because it looked similar but was less weight. It has been one of the best finds I have… Full review

ALPS Mountaineering Sundance 6

rated 4.5 of 5 stars The ALPS Mountaineering Sundance 6 is a very solid choice for a family sized car camping tent. I am very pleased with mine. I purchased the ALPS Mountaineering Sundance 6 after an extensive search for a family size tent to replace my much loved Cabelas Alaskan Guide 8-person dome tent. I did quite a bit of research on both cabin tents and dome tents. Having never owned a cabin style tent I was reluctant to go with this design. I am pleased that I did! The Sundance 6 is a 3-season 6-person cabin… Full review

MSR Elixir 2

rated 4.5 of 5 stars Two-person tent tested out on the GR20 (Corsica). Resistant, light, and easy to stock! 2.6 kg with the removable ground sheet. Not that heavy if separated into two backpacks, but I would be happy to see it coming down to 2kg. The Hubba NX  is lighter but too fragile, this why I see the Elixir losing just a bit of an edge, but keeping waterproofness and resistance against wind-shocks, rain and snow. By the way, about wind-shocks. I added extra cord loops to each part where you can use tent pegs. Full review

Big Agnes Fly Creek UL2

rated 4 of 5 stars Awesome tent, great to backpack with. Very compact, quick to set up, and has kept me dry in torrential rains and 30+ mph winds. Minus a star only because it will not stand on its own, and one of the zippers quickly broke on me. Setup:  Very fast setup, 5-10 minutes depending on surface. Really recommend getting the footprint not only for protection, but also allows you to just use the canopy if you so choose. Also makes setting up an easier process. Wasn't a fan of the original stakes, replaced… Full review

Hillary Hex Dome with 2 Lockers

rated 5 of 5 stars A durable and great roomy tent for us bigger people. I'm 6'4" and can almost stand up in it. I bought this tent on clearance at Sears for just under $40. LOVE IT!!! I've been using it several times a year for about 10 years. As I am a bigger guy, this tent has plenty of room, surprisingly it looks small from the outside. Put some scotch guard on it, and you are good to go. This tent even made it through a tropical storm, while several other tents did not. Just make sure to air it out. I accidentally… Full review

MSR Fling

rated 4.5 of 5 stars Lightweight and plenty of room, this is an excellent backpacking tent for those looking for a middle ground between ultralight tarps and double wall tents. Would be a little snug for two larger people. Simple straightforward design. Either free standing with the ridge pole, which gives a little extra headroom, or travel lighter and leave the ridge pole at home and set up the tent with stakes and tension lines. Awning side venting helps reduce condensation, the only real drawback to a 3-season single… Full review

Top-Rated Tents and Shelters

Sort by: name | rating | price | availability | recently reviewed

user rating: 4.5 of 5 (12)
Sierra Designs Sirius 2 reviewed Sep 28, 2016
discontinued
 
user rating: 4 of 5 (2)
Integral Designs Unishelter reviewed Sep 28, 2016
discontinued
user rating: 3.5 of 5 (6)
Kelty TN2 reviewed Sep 28, 2016
$250
 
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (4)
Eureka! Mountain Pass 1XT reviewed Sep 28, 2016
discontinued
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (1)
ALPS Mountaineering Sundance 6 reviewed Sep 28, 2016
discontinued
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (4)
MSR Elixir 2 reviewed Sep 28, 2016
$195 - $249
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (20)
Big Agnes Fly Creek UL2 reviewed Sep 27, 2016
$280 - $349
user rating: 2.5 of 5 (3)
Hillary Hex Dome with 2 Lockers reviewed Sep 27, 2016
user rating: 4 of 5 (9)
MSR Fling reviewed Sep 26, 2016
discontinued
user rating: 3 of 5 (4)
No Limits Kings Peak II reviewed Sep 26, 2016
$70 MSRP
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (3)
ALPS Mountaineering Lynx 1 reviewed Sep 26, 2016
user rating: 4 of 5 (10)
MSR Mutha Hubba reviewed Sep 25, 2016
$450
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (8)
REI Chrysalis UL Tent reviewed Sep 25, 2016
user rating: 5 of 5 (1)
Fjallraven Abisko Endurance 2 reviewed Sep 24, 2016
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (5)
REI Arete ASL 2 Tent reviewed Sep 24, 2016
$359
user rating: 5 of 5 (5)
Grand Trunk Double Parachute Nylon Hammock reviewed Sep 24, 2016
$65 - $74
 
user rating: 3.5 of 5 (5)
Peak 1 Apollo reviewed Sep 23, 2016
user rating: 4 of 5 (7)
Terra Nova Super Quasar reviewed Sep 23, 2016
user rating: 4 of 5 (4)
Sierra Designs Vapor Light 2 XL reviewed Sep 23, 2016
$330 MSRP
user rating: 3.5 of 5 (1)
Big Agnes Flying Diamond 4 reviewed Sep 22, 2016
$450
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (3)
Big Agnes Tensleep Station 6 reviewed Sep 22, 2016
$500
user rating: 4 of 5 (26)
Marmot Limelight 2P reviewed Sep 22, 2016
$170 - $249
 
user rating: 3.5 of 5 (5)
Hillary 4 Room Family Tent reviewed Sep 22, 2016
user rating: 5 of 5 (1)
Coghlan's Deluxe Mosquito Head Net reviewed Sep 22, 2016
$5
user rating: 4 of 5 (9)
Cabela's Alaskan Guide reviewed Sep 22, 2016
$350
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (2)
Marmot Ajax 2 reviewed Sep 22, 2016
$170
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (7)
REI Quarter Dome 2 reviewed Sep 22, 2016
$299
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (4)
The North Face Stormbreak 1 reviewed Sep 22, 2016
$129
user rating: 5 of 5 (12)
Mountain Hardwear Skyview 3 reviewed Sep 21, 2016
discontinued
user rating: 4 of 5 (8)
REI Minimalist reviewed Sep 21, 2016
$90 MSRP
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (18)
Hilleberg Akto reviewed Sep 20, 2016
$530
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (3)
REI Passage 2 Tent reviewed Sep 20, 2016
$159
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (3)
MSR Hoop reviewed Sep 20, 2016
$350 MSRP
user rating: 5 of 5 (1)
Snugpak The Cave reviewed Sep 19, 2016
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (7)
Marmot Thor 2P reviewed Sep 18, 2016
$559
user rating: 3.5 of 5 (5)
Eagles Nest Outfitters Ember 2 reviewed Sep 17, 2016
$100
user rating: 4 of 5 (6)
ALPS Mountaineering Zephyr 3.0 reviewed Sep 17, 2016
$161
user rating: 5 of 5 (2)
DD Hammocks Tarp 3x3 reviewed Sep 17, 2016
user rating: 4 of 5 (13)
Bibler Ahwahnee reviewed Sep 17, 2016
discontinued
user rating: 5 of 5 (1)
Alpine Mountain Gear Solo Plus Alaskan reviewed Sep 16, 2016
$150 MSRP
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (15)
Eureka! Backcountry 1 reviewed Sep 16, 2016
discontinued
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (21)
Big Agnes Seedhouse SL2 reviewed Sep 16, 2016
$262 - $349
user rating: 3.5 of 5 (1)
Easton Torrent 2 reviewed Sep 15, 2016
$160
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (19)
Marmot Limelight 3P reviewed Sep 15, 2016
$224 - $299
user rating: 5 of 5 (1)
Hilleberg Kaitum 3 Footprint reviewed Sep 14, 2016
$112
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (6)
Hilleberg Nallo 3 reviewed Sep 14, 2016
$785
user rating: 5 of 5 (7)
Hilleberg Soulo reviewed Sep 14, 2016
$685
user rating: 5 of 5 (6)
Hilleberg Nammatj 3 GT reviewed Sep 13, 2016
$979
user rating: 5 of 5 (2)
Hilleberg Kaitum 3 reviewed Sep 13, 2016
$950 MSRP
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (1)
Exped Vela I Extreme reviewed Sep 13, 2016
$399
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What’s the “best” tent or shelter for you? Consider your personal outdoor needs, preferences, and budget:

  • Conditions:
    First, and most important, in what seasons, conditions, and terrain will you use your tent, tarp, or hammock? Choose a shelter that can handle the conditions you expect to encounter (rain, snow, wind, heat, humidity, biting insects, an energetic scout troop), but don’t buy more tent than you truly need, and don’t expect one tent to do it all.
  • Capacity:
    Tents are typically classified by sleeping capacity (i.e. one-person, two-person, etc). However, a tent's stated sleeping capacity usually does not include much (or any) space for your gear and there’s no sizing standard between tent manufacturers. Some users size up.
  • Livability:
    Will you use the tent as a basecamp or is it an emergency shelter only? To determine if you and your gear will fit, look at the shelter’s dimensions, including floor and vestibule square areas, height and headroom (including at the sides), plus the number and placement of doors, gear lofts, and pockets, to assess personal livability, comfort, and footprint.
  • Weight and Packed Size:
    If you’ll be backpacking, climbing, cycling, or otherwise carrying that shelter, consider its weight, packed size (and your pack it needs to fit in), and its space-to-weight ratio before automatically opting for the bigger tent. Paddlers and car campers have more room to work with, but everyone should consider how the tent and its parts pack up for stowage.
  • Design:
    Tents come in various designs. Freestanding tents can stand alone without stakes or guy lines and can be easily moved or have dirt and other debris shaken out without being disassembled, though they still need to be staked out. Rounded, geodesic domes are stable and able to withstand heavy snow loads and wind. Tunnel tents are narrow and rectangular, and large family cabin tents are best for warm-weather campground outings.
  • Other features and specs to consider include single versus double-wall, ease of setup, stability, weather resistance, ventilation, , and any noteworthy features.
  • Read more in our guide to tents.