Ushba Basic Ascender

0 reviews
5-star:   0
4-star:   0
3-star:   0
2-star:   0
1-star:   0

Retailers' Descriptions

Here's what other sites are saying:

The Ushba Basic Ascender Sport is a trustworthy supplemental ascender that's compact and easy to use. The aluminum-bodied Basic Ascender is designed for use with haul systems on alpine ascents, for crevasse rescue or as a top rope self-belay device. The smooth-running toothless cam design won't slip on icy or muddy ropes, making it ideal for harsh alpine climates. The Basic Ascender's dimensions are 3 x 2 x .75in, and has a rope holding strength of +4kN/900lb. *Not for use as a lead belay device.

- Backcountry.com

Compact, lightweight, and easy to use, the Basic Ascender is rope-friendly, extremely strong, and will not slip on icy or muddy ropes. These fail-safe features combine to make it an excellent choice for top-rope solo and self-belay applications. Flawless performance during glacier travel and crevasse rescue, the Basic is unsurpassed for hauling and rigging systems, or as a supplemental ascender. The Basic smoothly moves up and down the rope, yet securely grips with the slightest downward pull. UIAA and CE Certified. Case and Axle Material: Aluminum. Cam and Block Material: Nickel-plated Aluminum. Case Strength: 4600 lbs.. Rope Holding Strength: +4kN/900 lb.. Dimensions: 3 x 2 x 0.75 in.. Weight: 136g. Rope Diameters: 8-13mm

- Tahoe Mountain Sports

Lightweight compact construction has made the Ushba Basic Ascender a trusted companion for years now. The toothless cam is strong and will not slip on icy or muddy ropes. Essentially a supplemental ascender designed for alpine ascents and hauling systems, the Basic Ascender is also ideal for crevasse rescue. Smooth, friction-free cam operation. NOT TO BE USED AS A LEAD BELAY DEVICE. Satisfies UIAA/CE Standards. Available in durable aluminum or ultra light titanium.

- Vargo Outdoors

Ushba Basic Ascender

previously retailed for:
$79.95 - $99.95

The Ushba Basic Ascender is not available from the stores we monitor. It was last seen January 29, 2013 at Backcountry.com.

If you're looking for a new ascender, check out the best reviewed current models.