do dogs attract bears?

9:33 a.m. on April 8, 2002 (EDT)
(Guest)

Thanks to all who have responded to my numerous questions thus far....

I'm planning to travel ALONE to NW MT with my dog, bear spray (and perhaps another "licensed" deterrent). The folks at Glacier NP spoke of dogs as a potential attractor to bears.

Any opinions out there on this one?

12:34 p.m. on April 8, 2002 (EDT)
(Guest)

Quote:

Thanks to all who have responded to my numerous questions thus far....

I'm planning to travel ALONE to NW MT with my dog, bear spray (and perhaps another "licensed" deterrent). The folks at Glacier NP spoke of dogs as a potential attractor to bears.

Any opinions out there on this one?

I've heard people vehemently argue this one both ways. Not sure if there is any hard data on this. My current preference is to travel without dogs in the group.

My comment really relates to having a loose dog on the trail. Every year I invariably get "charged" by a dog on trails. This winter, I very nearly had to plant my ice tool into a mutt that wouldn't leave me alone (kept nipping at me from behind) and who's owner could not control it.

So, although I like dogs as pets, I say - leave them at home.

No offence intended to poochie.....

D

2:08 p.m. on April 8, 2002 (EDT)
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Deterrant...do tell!

Quote:

I'm planning to travel ALONE to NW MT with my dog, bear spray (and perhaps another "licensed" deterrent). The folks at Glacier NP spoke of dogs as a potential attractor to bears.

Ohhh, do tell. Please don't say 9mm auto...!

Remember, you'll be restricted in any national park in the lower 48 for those certain types of "deterrants". In AK, some parks encourage these deterrants (maybe all except Denali). Kinda interesting...

Another debate altogether!

Quote:

Any opinions out there on this one?

Dogs? Probably a bit of both. Some claim that they attract a curious bear and some say deterrant. I've probably heard more deterrant stories.

My opinion is that wildlife will smell and or hear your critter and will be more prone to stay away. But, depends on the dog. Nice alarm for nighttime campin'...though...

I'd suggest a leash. I grew up with dogs who would escape the backyard and be gone for daze at a time chasin' wildlife. I also have, uhh, "acquantences" who shoot feral dogs that are chasin' deer on site, a bit of a sport for them. Can be a problem (dogs packin' up to pester critters) in some areas in MT.

Brian in SLC

8:50 p.m. on April 8, 2002 (EDT)
(Guest)

Re: Deterrant...do tell!

Quote:

Quote:

I'm planning to travel ALONE to NW MT with my dog, bear spray (and perhaps another "licensed" deterrent). The folks at Glacier NP spoke of dogs as a potential attractor to bears.

Ohhh, do tell. Please don't say 9mm auto...!

Remember, you'll be restricted in any national park in the lower 48 for those certain types of "deterrants". In AK, some parks encourage these deterrants (maybe all except Denali). Kinda interesting...

Haven't heard much about AK and encouraging the carrying of a you-know-what.

I am not sure of the caliber yet but as a single female.... and especially since that woman who was camping by herself in the (NH) White Mtns over Thanksgiving was found stabbed to death...in addition to the Yosemite murders a few years back.
The "deterrant" of as-of-yet-unknown caliber is mostly for when I take shorter trips in the east... and yes, I do plan on going to AK more than once. And while practice may not make perfect, I do practice w/ the local authorities... the same guys that fix my speeding tickets (just kidding, wishful thinking). And yes, most "hand"-deterrants will not stop an angry grizzly. I am the one that's entering their turf anyway, it's really their land....With the dog, NP's are out of the question. NF's are not.

Quote:

Another debate altogether!

Quote:

Any opinions out there on this one?

Dogs? Probably a bit of both. Some claim that they attract a curious bear and some say deterrant. I've probably heard more deterrant stories.

good... it seems that most web info is negative towards dogs in the backcountry... but there must be people out there do long backpacking with dogs.

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My opinion is that wildlife will smell and or hear your critter and will be more prone to stay away. But, depends on the dog. Nice alarm for nighttime campin'...though...

She's quite the sentinel. I've done short camping trips with her, as well as have her be the lookout when I take naps at random truckstops in the middle of the night during long drives.

I would imagine that wolves and bears are pretty much in the same link in the food chain. I wonder if one avoids the other in nature.

Quote:

I'd suggest a leash. I grew up with dogs who would escape the backyard and be gone for daze at a time chasin' wildlife. I also have, uhh, "acquantences" who shoot feral dogs that are chasin' deer on site, a bit of a sport for them. Can be a problem (dogs packin' up to pester critters) in some areas in MT.

Would never leave without a leash.... Plenty of folks like that here too (some of them are my neighbors here in in GA. they have bumper stickers stating "Charleton Heston is my president) as well as folks like the ones in Deliverance. But she's really good with commands and sticks really close on trips so wandering is not a problem.
Never been to MT and am not sure what the "tenor" of the people is like. My primary purpose in heading there (and AK) isn't to meet people anyway...

Quote:

Brian in SLC

between the dog, bear spray and a licensed "deterrant" and a brain, I can't think of any other ways be prepared for "defensive" emergencies in the back country. Anyway, I feel like I am coming across as an anti social vigilante but that really ins't the case. I am just pining for soltude, quality time with the dog and to experiences new climate, terrain and geography :)

7:15 p.m. on April 9, 2002 (EDT)
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About the murders ...

The Yosemite murders of a few years back (currently yet another court case going on, making the nightly news locally pretty often) did _not_ occur in camping situations. The mother, daughter, and visiting friend were grabbed in a motel room outside Yosemite NP by a guy who was working as a caretaker at the motel. He apparently kept them hostage in the motel room for a few days before doing all the nasty things (this is a family board, so I won't go into details like America's Most Wanted), then dumping the one body in one location and burning the other two in the abandoned car. How would you like to have been the cab driver the guy called to get driven back to El Portal (location of the motel)? Cabbie didn't know about anything until the guy was caught after killing the Yosemite ranger. The ranger was killed in broad daylight in an employees' residential area, again, not camping, much less wilderness camping.

In other words, these were basically urban murders.

From what I have read about the NH case, the murder itself likely took place close to the cars - again essentially an urban crime. Last I read, the police had suspicions that the killer knew the victim, maybe was a stalker from her home town.

In other words, you are probably orders of magnitude safer in the wilderness than in your home town, or in a motel in an urban setting. Statistically, the vast majority of murders are by someone known to the victim. Sometimes, the killing is totally baffling. We had a case here where a very well-respected man apparently killed his very popular teacher wife in a particularly brutal manner. The guy was a Scout leader, who I knew moderately well. In the experience of all of us who knew him through Scouts, his church, and the schools, he was very gentle and understanding, and a peace-maker and intermediary when there were disagreements between other people. The evidence presented in court was heavily against him (blood on his shirt and shoes which he had tried to hide, cell call that was supposedly made from miles away but traced through cell records to within a mile of his house, lots of other things). Yet for those of us who knew him, this was totally out of character and completely baffling.

In other words, the "deterrant" (licensed or not) is unlikely to be needed for 2-legged marauders once in the wilderness, or probably even be of help despite being at hand.

Now about those bears - I've personally never had a problem in the 60+ years I've been heading into the hills, although people camped within 50 feet of me have, and my brother-in-law lost all his food to bears twice. On the other hand, Herrera sure has a list of cases where bear-people interactions have had the human on the losing end, some where dogs helped, others where the dogs just enraged the bear to more vicious attacks.

1:25 p.m. on April 10, 2002 (EDT)
(Guest)

Re: About the murders ...

Thanks for your reply.... informative as always.

Quote:

In other words, the "deterrant" (licensed or not) is unlikely to be needed for 2-legged marauders once in the wilderness, or probably even be of help despite being at hand.

true, but I have to get through "quasi-urban" situations such as the ones surrounding the aforementioned murders. While statistically slim, those incidences did occur.

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Now about those bears - I've personally never had a problem in the 60+ years I've been heading into the hills, although people camped within 50 feet of me have, and my brother-in-law lost all his food to bears twice. On the other hand, Herrera sure has a list of cases where bear-people interactions have had the human on the losing end, some where dogs helped, others where the dogs just enraged the bear to more vicious attacks.

this one is soooo evenly divided. The concludion I have come to is that her extra eyes, ears and nose (and companionship) will be a good thing in my situation.

6:55 p.m. on April 11, 2002 (EDT)
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a.k.a. Bob
Re: About the murders ...

I don

8:57 a.m. on April 12, 2002 (EDT)
(Guest)

Re: About the murders ...

Quote:

This of course assumes that there is training both of the dog, and in the use of handguns.

Sadly, they were hiking with a dog, albeit a golden retriever

January 17, 2019
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