Two Nineteen Forty Four = Wow

5:44 p.m. on April 16, 2018 (EDT)
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Amazing time lapse of last year's record speed run up El Cap's Nose. Great video showcases some really great teamwork. I'm not going up there, but it sure is fun to watch!

https://vimeo.com/264661267

9:37 a.m. on April 18, 2018 (EDT)
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that was wild, thanks for sharing

1:09 p.m. on April 19, 2018 (EDT)
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More than wild.  I never realized that sometimes the second guy  would just swing over an avoid part of the climb---makes sense, but until I saw it, I wouldn't have believed it.

2:03 p.m. on April 19, 2018 (EDT)
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balzaccom said:

More than wild.  I never realized that sometimes the second guy  would just swing over an avoid part of the climb---makes sense, but until I saw it, I wouldn't have believed it.

 That is what blew me away too. Not being a climber I don't know if that is a common move, but it was neat the way they used it to take a route you couldn't otherwise. The first climber swung the second over to reach the route on the left, then he returned the favor by getting above and swinging the first guy over. You couldn't do the climb on their route solo. It takes teamwork :)

8:25 p.m. on April 19, 2018 (EDT)
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That is a (relatively, for people in the climbing community i guess) famous part of the route called the Lynn Hill traverse. The route up El Cap backtracks (as in you go up and have to come back down, and over, slightly a couple times). You can traverse it sideways but clearly in the interest of speed just swinging over is faster. Also, leading the pitch *can* be more difficult so they've used this as a time efficient way to switch leads. I say *can* because clearly to pull off this feat this is not an overly difficult climb for either.

It brings up the ethical debate of what is climbing? Much in the way that many are conserved with the FKT on trails like the AT and PCT, climbers have become obsessed not with the challenge but the speed. It a dangerous game (on the alpine side, look what happened to Ueli Steck) but to each their own I guess.

Not only can the route be done solo, Alex Honnold did it with any partner OR rope. Go watch that movie if you want sweating palms.

7:48 a.m. on April 20, 2018 (EDT)
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Jake W said:


Not only can the route be done solo, Alex Honnold did it with any partner OR rope. Go watch that movie if you want sweating palms.

 Just curious, would that be following this same basic route and rather than swing across the traverse on a rope he did it by hand? This stuff is lots of fun to watch in this age of HD video and drones. I find it very interesting on my screen, but have no desire to do it :)

12:29 p.m. on April 20, 2018 (EDT)
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I agree LS this is a lot of fun to watch now.

I don't have any urge to rock climb but could see myself learning about mountaineering. One day I might well want to summit a peak that requires more than a helmet, light traction and ice axe....we'll see . :)

2:57 p.m. on April 20, 2018 (EDT)
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Jake W said:

(Some) ".. climbers have become obsessed not with the challenge but the speed..."

Folks need to choose their heroes more wisely.  Ueli Steck was a climbing icon; Kurt Cobain, Jim Morrison and Jimi Hendrix all rock star heros. And all died because of the hazards of their passions.  

I have issues with speed climbing, too.  Likewise for pendulating from anything less than bolts or a solid bollard.  A lot of force gets generated swinging around on a rope and the force vector can cover a wide arc; both requiring exceptional anchor building skill.   I got into climbing, initially for the wrong reasons, got pretty good, confident enough that I largely lost fear of the vertical and exposure.  Over confidence is not good.   Eventually the reality of the objective risks, losing a few associates and the experience of finding myself center lane on a few bowling alleys made, me realize that pressing the sport eventually leads to climbing too fast, playing dodge ball with rock and ice fall, or getting stuck out in severe weather.  It was fun while it lasted, but I have no desire to pursue it in earnest again, as I seem to have slain the personal dragons that chased me up ledges in the first place.  Nowadays I take the easiest way to the top - if there is a road I'm driving!  I may resort to roping up while ascending a steep couloir on a ski tour, but climbing as such is strictly a means to get there for me, versus the core reason for being there.

Ed

6:25 p.m. on April 20, 2018 (EDT)
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My trouble with speed running/hiking/climbing is; I don't feel as obligated to help when the person doing the speeding, which increases the risks, gets hurt/in trouble. I doubt I would not help but in the past I just did it [helped strangers in need] and thought nothing of it.  That's why I became an EMT, to help.

With a speeding accident I'd be more likely to say 'I told you so' [more or less] and would dislike someone interrupting my time on the trail...more especially if they put me or others at risk then also.

2:34 p.m. on April 22, 2018 (EDT)
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Old Guide said:

My trouble with speed running/hiking/climbing is; I don't feel as obligated to help when the person doing the speeding, which increases the risks, gets hurt/in trouble. I doubt I would not help but in the past I just did it [helped strangers in need] and thought nothing of it.  That's why I became an EMT, to help.

With a speeding accident I'd be more likely to say 'I told you so' [more or less] and would dislike someone interrupting my time on the trail...more especially if they put me or others at risk then also.

 I think I follow what you're saying there OG. On the distance trails I find many of the speed obsessed folks to be anti social. Not in terms of words as they'll happily talk your ear off about how fast they are. I mean anti social in that they don't think of anything but their own needs. Waking up a camp full of people at midnight is just rude whether it was a 10 mile day or 50.

Putting your own needs above everyone else's just strikes me wrong in a community where most see hiking as a team sport and we're all on the same side. Do your own thing, be that fast or slow, but don't do anything that negatively impacts others. Not all speedy folks are that clueless though. Others I've met seemed almost saint-like in their ability to be rocking huge miles with humility and grace. I don't want to go that fast because I like to enjoy the views and savor the moments, but I don't begrudge them one bit for doing it their way.

Guess what I'm saying is that it doesn't matter whether you go fast or slow. What matters is that you go with some class :)

9:32 p.m. on April 22, 2018 (EDT)
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LoneStranger-I too like enjoying the time in the woods...and the best way to do that is not to hurry. One boy I mentored, and I still call him the nicest kid in the world and I'd trust him with my life, hell he calls me on Fathers day when my own forgets, is always hurrying to complete a hike or climb or bike trip or whatever. But then he has to wait for others to catch up-doesn't always make sense to me. I know some of that is because he is so physically fit but I can ask him, did you see that? Or did you see that deer? Or that big oak which fell over since the last time we were up here? And always the answer is no. Maybe some of my slowness and thoroughness comes from decades of hunting and that's the one thing that kid doesn't do. Or maybe, its something else like, I know what it is like to be injured and he hasn't been. I  don't know. I never figured it out.

That thing about class-some will never get it while life often teaches others to be humble.

12:47 a.m. on April 23, 2018 (EDT)
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Noticing things along the trail isn't always just about hiking fast or slow.  My wife tends to look down, and notice micro-objects that I often miss, from bugs and scat to fungus and flowers.  But I tend to look up a lot, and so I often draw her attention to distant views of the peaks that she would miss.

But we still both remember the through hiker who raced past us on the JMT heading south, and completely missed a stunning view of the Minarets (the only really good view of them along this trail) because he was so intent on hiking past us.  We caught up to him a few minutes later, as he was eating a snack, pretty much in the middle of the trail, in a spot that had no view whatsoever...

2:31 a.m. on May 2, 2018 (EDT)
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What an impressive time-lapse video, though the movement looks like stop-motion animation. I'm kinda awestruck by its production value. 

6:50 a.m. on May 2, 2018 (EDT)
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Ruther Jocson said:

What an impressive time-lapse video, though the movement looks like stop-motion animation. I'm kinda awestruck by its production value. 

 The reason it looks like that is because it is basically the same thing RJ. The difference is that instead of moving models around the climbers move themselves :)

Time lapse is done either by taking a single frame periodically or taking a live speed movie and removing frames to achieve the same result. It is a challenge to balance avoiding that stop action effect and reducing video size and length. When I make sunrise/sunset time lapse videos I record full speed video and then mess around on the computer to find a speed I like.

1:17 p.m. on May 2, 2018 (EDT)
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LoneStranger said:

Jake W said:


Not only can the route be done solo, Alex Honnold did it with any partner OR rope. Go watch that movie if you want sweating palms.

 Just curious, would that be following this same basic route and rather than swing across the traverse on a rope he did it by hand? This stuff is lots of fun to watch in this age of HD video and drones. I find it very interesting on my screen, but have no desire to do it :)

 Honnold soloed a different route, Freerider, "the easiest and most popular free route on El Capitan" :

https://www.climbing.com/news/alex-honnold-completes-first-free-solo-of-el-capitan/

No pendulum, but plenty of other challenges.

July 19, 2018
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