What is in your daypack?

11:43 p.m. on January 15, 2012 (EST)
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I am shopping around for a new daypack, and while doing so, it had me looking at and re-evaluating my gear I take with me on the trail for a day hike. It made me wonder, what do you bring in your pack? I know everyone brings different things, especially depending on where they are going, but I thought it would be fun to see who is bringing what. You never know, I might get some pointers or ideas :D

I'll start -- in my daypack is: 2L bladder, first aid kit, bandana, small swiss-army-style multi-tool knife, head lamp, compass, GPS, some trinkets in case I am geocaching, a point and shoot digital camera, some alcohol wipes in case my hands get yucky, a zip lock bag or 2, a jacket, some snacks, and if I am out for a while I will bring a lunch. 

12:23 a.m. on January 16, 2012 (EST)
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MUST HAVE ALL THIS. It is always in my bag.
1. Map

2. Compass

3. Flashlight / Headlamp

4. Extra Food
5. Extra Clothing

6. Sunglasses
7. First-Aid Kit

8. Pocket Knife & Tools
9. Waterproof Matches

10. Firestarter

11. Water / Filter / Bottles

12. Whistle

13. Insect clothing or repellents

14. Sunburn preventatives

7:39 a.m. on January 16, 2012 (EST)
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My daypack usually has all of this:

Stoic vaporshell *i will also bring rain pants if not bringing my waders. Nano puff pullover Map Compass first aid kit fire starting kit bk11 knife sunglasses whistle snacks/meal mug supercat stove and a few oz of alcohol iphone 4 *dry set of baselayers, top and bottom for winter. *fly rod and flies *waders *thermos of coffee *bug net

Anything with a * is either depending on the weather/season or if i am fishing.

9:20 a.m. on January 16, 2012 (EST)
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Most of the 10 essentials.

Energy Goo that I forgot was in there.

My OR down sweater.

Couple of trash bags.

Firearm (depending on season and rules)

Harmonica (to keep people away)

Book (sometimes)

10:26 a.m. on January 16, 2012 (EST)
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Besides food and water:  survival kit (compass, firestarter, teeny LED flashlight, mylar bivy bag, paracord, chemical handwarmer), gortex shell, some type of puffy jacket, GPS, xtra pair of socks, two Buffs, gloves sometimes and sometimes a map if I am in an area I am unfamiliar with.  All contained in a Gregory Z35.  Oh, a Leatherman Wave.

11:07 a.m. on January 16, 2012 (EST)
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FromSagetoSnow said:

Most of the 10 essentials.

Energy Goo that I forgot was in there.

My OR down sweater.

Couple of trash bags.

Firearm (depending on season and rules)

Harmonica (to keep people away)

Book (sometimes)

 LOL!  I'm gonna have to start carring a harmonica!  :-)

11:09 a.m. on January 16, 2012 (EST)
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Mine is in my Deuter Futura Pro 40. I don't actually get too far afield on my day hikes and there are usually people aound. But I go by the rule of the unusual. Anything can happen and it may happen in unusually sparse area or a day when nobody is around so I better be prepared. Early this fall there was a guy hiking up at Mt. Charleston. There was a snow storm and he got stranded with his dog. Because he had all the right stuff, he could communicate with authorities. Weather prevented them from going in for him. He was able to let them know that he had the gear to get through a very cold night and then wait for the weather to break and the copter to come. That is how it always should be.

12:30 p.m. on January 16, 2012 (EST)
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This is somewhat of an interesting subject to me. I am planning on completing the LHHT(70 miles) in 3 days(or less) towards summer.

I will be going UL and very minimal for this one. I am also leaving the 85L pack at home in exchange for my Stratos 26.

Someone on my last trip brought it up and I took the bait. 

1:16 p.m. on January 16, 2012 (EST)
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giftogab said:

MUST HAVE ALL THIS. It is always in my bag.
1. Map

2. Compass

3. Flashlight / Headlamp

4. Extra Food
5. Extra Clothing

6. Sunglasses
7. First-Aid Kit

8. Pocket Knife & Tools
9. Waterproof Matches

10. Firestarter

11. Water / Filter / Bottles

12. Whistle

13. Insect clothing or repellents

14. Sunburn preventatives

 plus transistor radio

and line with a couple of carabiners

stainless cup that can boil water within

12:32 a.m. on January 17, 2012 (EST)
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The ten essentials, plus a couple of additional items, including glucosamine. Always enough gear to spend the night outdoors in conditions that could worsen. That doesn't mean spending a comfortable night, but one which I can survive without becoming hypothermic.

12:53 a.m. on January 17, 2012 (EST)
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Something I carry in my backpack and in my vehicle 100% of the time is something I've yet to see mentioned here on Trailspace: Emergency contact information.  (No need to point me to the thread about this - I just haven't actually seen it yet!)

I typed out the names and phone numbers of four people on a business card-sized piece of card stock and laminated it.  That way, especially considering I never carry my wallet, if the unspeakable does happen, or I'm unconscious, people will know who needs to be notified.

1:13 a.m. on January 17, 2012 (EST)
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I have ICE contact info in my phone which is always with me. Even if the phone is locked my ICE contacts are available as well as basic info, blood type, and allergies.

1:16 a.m. on January 17, 2012 (EST)
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JimDoss said:

Something I carry in my backpack and in my vehicle 100% of the time is something I've yet to see mentioned here on Trailspace: Emergency contact information.  (No need to point me to the thread about this - I just haven't actually seen it yet!)

I typed out the names and phone numbers of four people on a business card-sized piece of card stock and laminated it.  That way, especially considering I never carry my wallet, if the unspeakable does happen, or I'm unconscious, people will know who needs to be notified.

 I have a ROAD-ID that I wear with my information, contact info and med info. It is on my wrist, so easy to see. I forget about mentioning it. I also always have my cell phone but never thought of a transistor radio. My GPS locator is turned on on my phone. I also always have electrolyte stuff.

1:34 a.m. on January 17, 2012 (EST)
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Dang!  That's something I totally forgot about!  I have a sheet of paper stored in a ziplock in the bottom of the pack.  I has 4 contacts, listed in order of importance, on it in case someone were come upon me and I were not able to communicate for whatever reason.  I've had it in there for months now and completely forgot about it.

3:11 a.m. on January 17, 2012 (EST)
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JimDoss said:

..Emergency contact information...

I typed out the names and phone numbers of four people on a business card-sized piece of card stock and laminated it...

giftogab said:

:

 I have a ROAD-ID that I wear with my information, contact info and med info. It is on my wrist, so easy to see...

 rob5073 said:

..I have a sheet of paper stored in a ziplock in the bottom of the pack.  I has 4 contacts, listed in order of importance...

The only jewelry I wear is my wedding band; I don’t care for the feel of cold metal on my body, hence wear no id bracelets or necklaces.  And paper documents are subject to the elements; even laminated documents can burn or mildew.  So who to contact when they find my bones? 

I carry my vital info etched onto a stainless steel card carried in my wallet, along with my DL.  When in the back country it goes in a pouch always on my person.  First responders will always be able to id me, be aware of my medical considerations, know of my HMO, contact next of kin, be made aware of my desires of living will and DNR stipulations, and know the whereabouts of my will and life insurance policies.

Ed

11:47 a.m. on January 17, 2012 (EST)
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it depends.  some of these things, i always have - first aid, knife, water.  the first aid kit has water treatment tabs, waterproof matches, and a firestarter or two as well as the actual first aid stuff. 

if i'm day-hiking on trails i know well and that aren't too remote, i dispense with a number of things i would normally take if i'm more remote - gps, compass, map, extra food, for example.  i might also dispense with bug stuff and sun block, depending on the season, the weather, and the length of the hike. 

the weather has a big impact on what i pack in terms of extra clothing, but the length of the hike and remoteness (or not) also have an impact.  i tend to bring a little more than i need, regardless, because if generally figure the weather can turn.  it's rare i don't have a wind or rain shell, for example.

i always have my cell phone and wallet and a small dry bag in the bottom of my pack, in case it rains or i otherwise want to make sure they stay dry.

1:26 p.m. on January 17, 2012 (EST)
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I never carry my wallet or badge on my person. I lock it in my vehicle, or teh vehicle of the person with whom I traveled.

 

Ed: The Road ID is not at all metal on my skin, it is mounted on very sturdy cordera type band. Also, those seurvival cords come with a placque on them as well...just in case you ever looked for a method that would stay right on your body.

4:20 p.m. on January 17, 2012 (EST)
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Funny, I have a Road ID, too, and forgot to mention it!

Funny thing is, I only wear it when I out solo.  And when I do, I wear it on my left wrist, which is the same hand I wear my watch.  But I can't wear both at the same time, so when I wear the Road ID, I feel it there and am always checking it to see what time it is!  :-)

1:57 p.m. on January 18, 2012 (EST)
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gifttogab, you might want to rethink leaving your wallet in a vehicle at a trailhead. If you do leave it in a vehicle, make sure it is well hidden, such as under an internal spare tire, under carpeting. It is bad enough to come back to a car with a window(smashed) but to lose your wallet and ID to some methead is salt in the wound.

2:55 p.m. on January 18, 2012 (EST)
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Erich said:

It is bad enough to come back to a car with a window(smashed) but to lose your wallet and ID to some methead is salt in the wound.

 BTDT, at least if leaving these items in the vehicle exercise the criteria of "the plain view doctrine" or the "out of site out of mind" logic.

If ya use a gps in the vehicle hiding it out of view only goes so far. The power cables that are coming out of the ports in your dash need to be hidden as well.

Also as an aside I use to have stickers all over my back hatch window that was associated with gear and the like.

This is a big no no from experience. 

This gives those with bad intentions the inclination to take a closer look. 

5:54 p.m. on January 18, 2012 (EST)
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Well hidden. Almost as well hidden as the secret VIN numbers cops don't testify about at court. I try to have little to nothing in my vehicle at the trailhead. Though, I must admit, the trailheads I am at are typically swarming with people. Some are not, however. I just perfer not to risk losing it on the trail...which is much more probable for me.

10:07 p.m. on January 18, 2012 (EST)
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Erich said:

gifttogab, you might want to rethink leaving your wallet in a vehicle at a trailhead. If you do leave it in a vehicle, make sure it is well hidden, such as under an internal spare tire, under carpeting. It is bad enough to come back to a car with a window(smashed) but to lose your wallet and ID to some methead is salt in the wound.

 I met some people on a backpacking trip in southern Utah, back in September.  We chatted a while, then, as we went our separate ways, I took their photo.  Since I was going to be back at the trailhead before them, I said I'd leave my email addy on the window of their vehicle.

They told me which vehicle was theirs, and then told me to just leave it in the glove box.  Seems they never lock their SUV - even on multi-day trips like the one they were on.  They said they'd rather have someone freely poke around in the SUV than have someone smash a window.

Can't argue with their logic, but I think I'd have a hard time leaving my unlocked truck parked at a trailhead for five days like they were doing!

12:17 p.m. on January 19, 2012 (EST)
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My brother always makes sure he has nothing of value inside his truck, and then leaves the doors unlocked. He's had it rummaged through, but no damage. One of my other brothers put is wallet in the glove box and locked the car. He arrived back to find his car was the only one with a smashed window and anything stolen. Upon looking around, he noticed no one else had locked their doors.

12:38 p.m. on January 19, 2012 (EST)
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I carry:

  • water (reservoir, stainless bottle, nalgene)
  • first aid kit
  • Write-in-rain paper & pen
  • water purification
  • Multiple Methods of making fire
  • SOL bivy (and a bag liner if conditions demand)
  • extra layers suitable for the season and potential conditions
  • Shell jacket (and pants except in summer conditions)
  • Gloves and wool cap Autumn through Spring
  • Knife and/or multi-tool
  • Flashlight and/or headlamp
  • Food for 1+ days that can be stretched under emegency
  • 50ft paracord
  • Cell phone & extra battery
  • Compass & Map (if I don't know the area by heart) 
  • Driver's license and some currency
  • DIY Alchy stove and Ti mug with some cocoa, cider, or tea (if I am heading a long ways out, or just want to stop and enjoy a warm drink)
  • Small fishing kit, if I want to.
  • Tarp or light shelter if I am going to a remote area, especially in winter. 
7:38 p.m. on March 18, 2012 (EDT)
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Man, you’re brave to lock your wallet in your rig.  I don’t even keep my registration in my truck cause the tweakers will steal anything, and once they have your identity you’re screwed.

9:40 p.m. on March 18, 2012 (EDT)
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you would have to be pretty determined to find it.......but i may rethink.....

12:03 a.m. on March 20, 2012 (EDT)
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add "playing cards" and you are almost there.

9:16 p.m. on March 20, 2012 (EDT)
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Money plus all the above, I also carry spoon, binoculars, small writing pad, hard and soft shell, and camera.  The other thing which I have failed in the past is test and use everything in the daypack, understand how it works.  It's to late on the trail.

2:52 p.m. on April 20, 2012 (EDT)
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From my website:

Equipment Lists:

For dayhikes in or around the city, you will need good hiking shoes or boots (running shoes are usually good only on pavement), a windproof shell, a wool sweater or synthetic fleece. You will need a daypack (10-20 litres), and:

- water (1-2 litres)
- snack or lunch (check event posting)
- rain gear or dollar store poncho
- hat, gloves, sunglasses

Suggested:

- first aid kit
- flashlight or headlamp for evening hikes
- sunscreen/bug spray, depending on the season
- camera.

Winter:

Depending on trail conditions, you might need devices for extra traction on your feet. Some popular brands include Microspikes, Stabilicers and Yak-Trax, all of which let your feet get a grip on ice or snow. If a hike is listed as 'Snowshoeing' you will need a pair, which can be rented from Mountain Equipment Co-op, Totem Outfitters, or other outdoor stores. Before you buy some, you will want to try out a few styles, and find out whether you really enjoy the sport!

In winter, carry extra layers to put on when you stop. You will need warmer boots, and might consider buying chemical packs to help keep your toes warm. Snow pants can be nice, and you'll want mittens and a toque.

For a mountain dayhike, wear a backpack (30-40 liters) containing:

- food and drink for the day
- some way of treating drinking water (tablets or water filter)
- extra warm clothing and rain gear
- a first-aid kit
- a flashlight or headlamp with extra batteries
- a pocket knife or multi-tool
- a compass, and map of the area
- a cigarette lighter or waterproof matches
- a candle or two to provide heat and light, and for use as a fire starter
- a lightweight emergency blanket; plastic tarp or poncho, and cord to make a shelter
- an orange garbage bag, to be used for weather protection for you or your pack or for signaling
- a whistle - three short blasts (or three of anything!) to call for help.
- bear spray
- toilet paper
- insect repellent and sunscreen
- carry a cell phone, but be aware that it may not work in the bus

When backpacking, you will have to add even more items. Depending on the season and the weather forecast, you will need:

- a proper backpack (60-80 liters), with rain cover
- your own sleeping bag, rated to at least the minimum overnight temperature
- a mattress pad (thermarest). Sleeping bag ratings assume you will be using one
- a good tent, or your half of it if you're sharing with someone
- a camping stove and fuel, pots and pans, or your share
- food and water sufficient for your needs, plus emergency rations like energy bars or trailmix

7:23 p.m. on April 20, 2012 (EDT)
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ganja

8:40 p.m. on April 20, 2012 (EDT)
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Since 90% of my day hiking is in state or national parks in NJ, PA, and NY where the trails are well marked I go very light, weather permitting.

Carry:

  • Water
  • Food
  • Hand Sanitizer
  • Small First Aid Kit
  • Folding Knife
  • Small Flashlight
  • GPS
  • Cellphone
  • Wallet
  • Keys
  • Contact/Medical Information
  • Emergency Survival Kit in Can


In the spring and fall I carry a hardshell and a fleece. I don't bring anything in the summer since if I am going to go out when it might rain then it is not worth it for me to carry the extra weight since even with the rain it will still be rather warm or I am only 30 minutes from my car.

12:18 p.m. on April 21, 2012 (EDT)
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spare pair of glasses

3:29 p.m. on April 22, 2012 (EDT)
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There are some changes depending on time of year, purpose of hike, etc., but here's what is pretty much always in there. It rides in the trunk of my car and I can grab it and go at a moment's notice. Add a water bottle, or stick the Camelbak into the pouch, maybe a snack, off we go:

Windbreaker, light gloves, toboggan (toque), plastic trash bags, silicone-flannel rag, binoculars, map of Nat'l. Forest, 1st aid kit, flashlight, bugspray, GPS, spare batteries, Ruger Single Six, .22 mag. ammo and cylinder, .22 LR ammo, Handi-wipes, Gerber multi-tool, crow call, compass, 100 ft. of Paracord, lumistick, Rite In the Rain pad/pouch, Mora Companion.

2:32 a.m. on May 2, 2012 (EDT)
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Seeing as this is a day trip, and I live in a nice moderate climate =D

- food (I love me some honey + whatever else in the pantry)

- 2 Liters of water (More if its super hot or extended hike)

- book

- a girl (hopefully!)

- paper and pencil 

For clothing

- I try not to wear too much cotton, but I'm poor 

- I vouch 100% for trail-runners. Unless I'm trekking over 3 days or going through snow/foot-deep-mud 

- hat/visor

11:19 a.m. on May 2, 2012 (EDT)
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pnoble said:

Seeing as this is a day trip, and I live in a nice moderate climate =D

- food (I love me some honey + whatever else in the pantry)

- 2 Liters of water (More if its super hot or extended hike)

- book

- a girl (hopefully!)

- paper and pencil 

For clothing

- I try not to wear too much cotton, but I'm poor 

- I vouch 100% for trail-runners. Unless I'm trekking over 3 days or going through snow/foot-deep-mud 

- hat/visor

 blow up ?

6:11 p.m. on May 3, 2012 (EDT)
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I have "THE TEN ESSENTIALS" and other stuff based on worst weather expected. i.e. down jacket, eVent or PacLite parka (& pants), gloves, balaclava, etc.

 extended 1st aid kit W/Sierra Club's excellent patient assessment & rescue form (I'm a ski patroller, the equivalent of Wilderness EMT training & thus the default First Responder) rescue reflective "blanket" for patient and compact CPR mask & several sizes of airways, among other extra items.

Sometimes I carry a Glock 17 depending on the Nevada desert area being tavelled. I have a Concealed Carry Permit for 7 states. Nevada has some "portable" hidden meth labs and in the high mountains near 'Vegas they have recently found pot farms. (Don't start with me about firearms and hiking. Like bear spray, I carry them only if I think they are necessary.)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

6:51 p.m. on May 3, 2012 (EDT)
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Water Headlamp Rainshell Wind resistant puffy (Nano Puff or TNF Zephyrus) Eno Hammock or Thermarest trail seat IPhone Lighter 5 hour energy Electrolyte tabs Snack Sometimes cider, jet boil, and UL cup Toboggan if cold at all Gerber crucial Tape&prewrap (small amt)

11:06 a.m. on May 4, 2012 (EDT)
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Signalling mirror ?

3:11 p.m. on May 18, 2012 (EDT)
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Bivanorak, down puffy, wool shirt, hard shell, rain pants, gloves and beenie, driclimb windshirt, 10 essentials, steripen, nalgene, binocs, couple beers.

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