Tents and Shelters

Ready for a night out? Whether you’re an ultralight alpinist, family of backpackers, devoted hanger, or comfort camper, you'll find the best tents, tarps, and hammocks for your outdoor overnights right here.

Check out our top picks below—including price comparisons—to shelter you in any terrain, trip, or season: winter mountaineering, three-season thru-hiking, warm weather car camping, hammock hanging, alpine bivys, tarps, and emergency shelter.

Or you can browse our thousands of independent tent and shelter ratings and reviews by product type, brand, or price. Written by real-world hikers, backpackers, alpinists, climbers, and paddlers, Trailspace community reviews will help you select a dependable, field-tested, outdoor abode just right for your next adventure.

Learn more about how to choose a tent/shelter below »

Category

Four-Season
3-4 Season Convertible
Three-Season
Warm Weather
Bivy Sacks
Tarps and Shelters
Hammocks
Bug Nets
Accessories

Brands

MSR
Eagles Nest Outfitters
Hilleberg
Marmot
Grand Trunk
Sierra Designs
EMS
Black Diamond
Kodiak Canvas
REI

User

Unisex
Kids'

Price

less than $25
$25 - $49.99
$50 - $99.99
$100 - $199.99
$200 - $299.99
$300 - $399.99
$400 - $499.99
$500 and above

Recent Tent/Shelter Reviews

Wild River B-487UWF 3 Man Tent

rated 5 of 5 stars This is a vintage product that is extremely light weight for its size (8x10) and easy to set up. Good for backpacking. I've had this tent for many years (I think I got it in the late 70's) and for the last 20 years it has been rolled up in my garage. I recently took it out and it's like new other than a faded streak along one edge. I can't find any info on the web regarding Wild River products so hopefully someone will know something about them. I've backpacked in the mountains with it and it performed… Full review

Mountain Hardwear Haven 3

rated 2 of 5 stars Rain fly never fit correctly and the zipper seams eventually fell apart. Except for that I really liked the design of the tent We used the heck out of this tent for several years and many long trips. The rain fly never fit correctly. This was clearly a design and engineering flaw. After a few years the zipper adhesive and stitching on the rain fly came apart completely, despite my efforts at repair. I contacted Mountain Hardwear about this and eventually sent the tent back to them. They gave me… Full review

MSR ToughStake

rated 3 of 5 stars The odds strongly favor the possibility that the manufacturer of the awesome bomb-shelter tent you bought skimped on the stakes to save cost and weight. Therefore you'll be needing a few more decent ones to get the job done. Consider these if your winter trips (or sand camping I assume) tend to be in pack-able snow.  MSR Toughstake I tested these stakes along with a four-season MSR Remote 2 tent.  Regular stakes do practically NOTHING for you in snow when the wind comes. If you are in deep snow… Full review

Dutchware ARGON Vented Sock

rated 5 of 5 stars I borrowed it from a friend and used it in 20°F weather. It really helped block the chill and was toasty in my 20°F bag with 40°F UQ. Used it to supplement my base winter gear. It really helped block out the wind and keep the chill out.  Full review

Coleman Hooligan 2

rated 4 of 5 stars Easy to set up and easy to tear down. I got this tent for car camping not backpacking as it is too heavy for backpacking. Very easy to set up by one person. Stuffing it back in the carry bag required a little finessing, but it will go. Plenty of room for a queen size air mattress and gear. I like that you can remove the rain fly for stargazing. Full review

Out Gear Recreation Singled Out Hammock

rated 5 of 5 stars All around everyday hammock! I take this thing everywhere with me and compared to the competition, including price, quality of material, ease of use, and design it is the same or better on many levels. The straps and hammock all fit into one small package, easily manageable on day hikes, just chillin' or relaxing, or even summer camping! This is a must buy and is extremely comfortable! If you've never laid in one of these you'll definitely be pleasantly surprised!  Full review

Nite Ize Figure 9 Carabiner

rated 4 of 5 stars A tarp camper's friend. These work great for quick tarp setups. Lunch breaks in the rain, late evening campsites, you need a tarp up quick, use these. On a cold, after sundown camp setup my fingers having been in the rain all day would not have been capable of tying good knots in the dark. These little babies allowed my tired self the quick setup that I so wanted. Purists may scoff, but I have an older friend, a WW2 vet, who scoffs at modern climbing hardware. He tells tales of major climbs using… Full review

Eureka! Solitaire

rated 4.5 of 5 stars Great tent for what it is. I thought this tent was easy to set up. Having never used anything but US Army issue before, this thing was a breeze. I did replace the stakes with the large nail type stakes since I tend to camp in some rocky terrain. I've used this tent in rainstorms and good old Georgia summer heat and thought that the rain fly and ventilation were great. I carry a 7,800 cubic inch pack that I put way too much stuff in and it and my boots fit in the gear area, just barely. I'm only… Full review

Out Gear Recreation Singled Out Hammock

rated 5 of 5 stars High quality materials at a great price. My entire family has been using this hammock indoors for 6 months now and it's still like brand new. We love it so much we installed another one. Best backpack hammock I've tried. I love that it's made in the USA by a small business. Full review

Top-Rated Tents and Shelters

Sort by: name | rating | price | availability | recently reviewed

NEW!
user rating: 5 of 5 (1)
MSR Remote 2 Four-Season Tent
$800
user rating: 5 of 5 (108)
Eagles Nest Outfitters DoubleNest Hammock
$61 - $89
user rating: 5 of 5 (15)
Eagles Nest Outfitters Atlas Straps Hammock Accessory
$26 - $39
user rating: 5 of 5 (10)
Hilleberg Nallo 2 Four-Season Tent
$735
user rating: 5 of 5 (7)
Hilleberg Soulo Four-Season Tent
$685
user rating: 5 of 5 (7)
MSR E-Wing Tarp/Shelter
$100
user rating: 5 of 5 (6)
Hilleberg Nammatj 3 GT Four-Season Tent
$979 - $989
user rating: 5 of 5 (6)
Eagles Nest Outfitters ProFly Rain Tarp Tarp/Shelter
$70 - $99
user rating: 5 of 5 (5)
Marmot Limelight 4P Three-Season Tent
$303 - $379
user rating: 5 of 5 (5)
Grand Trunk Double Parachute Nylon Hammock Hammock
$65 - $99
user rating: 5 of 5 (4)
Sierra Designs Lightning 2 FL Three-Season Tent
$285 - $379
user rating: 5 of 5 (3)
EMS Velocity 1 Tent Three-Season Tent
$269
user rating: 5 of 5 (3)
Black Diamond Mega Light Tarp/Shelter
$290
user rating: 5 of 5 (3)
Kodiak Canvas 10x10 Flex-Bow Canvas Tent Deluxe Four-Season Tent
$400
user rating: 5 of 5 (3)
Hilleberg Kaitum 2 Four-Season Tent
$885 - $895
user rating: 5 of 5 (3)
Hilleberg Nallo 3 GT Four-Season Tent
$885
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (37)
REI Half Dome 2 Three-Season Tent
$199
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (32)
Eagles Nest Outfitters SingleNest Hammock
$52 - $59
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (30)
Eureka! Apex 2XT Three-Season Tent
$112 - $114
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (28)
Eureka! Spitfire 1 Three-Season Tent
$140
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (28)
Mountain Hardwear Trango 2 Four-Season Tent
$553 - $650
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (22)
Eureka! Alpenlite XT Four-Season Tent
$370
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (22)
The North Face Mountain 25 Four-Season Tent
$589
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (21)
Big Agnes Seedhouse SL2 Three-Season Tent
$262 - $349
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (20)
Eureka! Timberline 2 Three-Season Tent
$144 - $179
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (19)
Marmot Limelight 3P Three-Season Tent
$254 - $299
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (18)
Hilleberg Akto Four-Season Tent
$530
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (18)
Kelty Noah's Tarp 12 Tarp/Shelter
$51 - $69
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (18)
Hennessy Hammock Expedition Asym Hammock
$160
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (18)
Kelty Grand Mesa 2 Three-Season Tent
$118 - $139
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (17)
REI Half Dome 2 Plus Three-Season Tent
$219
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (17)
Eureka! Timberline 4 Three-Season Tent
$184 - $239
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (15)
Hennessy Hammock Ultralight Backpacker Asym Hammock
$250
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (14)
Sierra Designs Light Year 1 Three-Season Tent
$170
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (14)
ALPS Mountaineering Zephyr 2.0 Three-Season Tent
$120 - $153
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (13)
Mountain Hardwear Hammerhead 2 Three-Season Tent
$225
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (12)
MSR Groundhog Tent Stakes Stake
$3 - $19
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (12)
Eagles Nest Outfitters Guardian Bug Net Hammock Accessory
$60
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (10)
Kelty Noah's Tarp 9 Tarp/Shelter
$60
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (10)
Eureka! Timberline SQ Outfitter 6 Three-Season Tent
$550
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (10)
Eureka! Assault Outfitter 4 Four-Season Tent
$450 - $479
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (8)
Big Agnes Big House 4 Three-Season Tent
$240 - $329
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (8)
Big Agnes Big House 6 Three-Season Tent
$280 - $325
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (8)
REI Camp Dome 2 Three-Season Tent
$100
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (8)
Big Agnes Copper Spur UL1 Three-Season Tent
$285 - $340
user rating: 5 of 5 (2)
Hyperlite Mountain Gear Flat Tarp Tarp/Shelter
$310
user rating: 5 of 5 (2)
MSR Elixir 3 Three-Season Tent
$300
user rating: 5 of 5 (2)
Kelty Noah's Tarp 16 Tarp/Shelter
$100
user rating: 5 of 5 (2)
Napier Sportz SUV Tent Warm Weather Tent
$340 - $369
user rating: 5 of 5 (2)
Eureka! Taron 2 Three-Season Tent
$180
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What’s the “best” tent or shelter for you? Consider your personal outdoor needs, preferences, and budget:

  • Conditions:
    First, and most important, in what seasons, conditions, and terrain will you use your tent, tarp, or hammock? Choose a shelter that can handle the conditions you expect to encounter (rain, snow, wind, heat, humidity, biting insects, an energetic scout troop), but don’t buy more tent than you truly need, and don’t expect one tent to do it all.
  • Capacity:
    Tents are typically classified by sleeping capacity (i.e. one-person, two-person, etc). However, a tent's stated sleeping capacity usually does not include much (or any) space for your gear and there’s no sizing standard between tent manufacturers. Some users size up.
  • Livability:
    Will you use the tent as a basecamp or is it an emergency shelter only? To determine if you and your gear will fit, look at the shelter’s dimensions, including floor and vestibule square areas, height and headroom (including at the sides), plus the number and placement of doors, gear lofts, and pockets, to assess personal livability, comfort, and footprint.
  • Weight and Packed Size:
    If you’ll be backpacking, climbing, cycling, or otherwise carrying that shelter, consider its weight, packed size (and your pack it needs to fit in), and its space-to-weight ratio before automatically opting for the bigger tent. Paddlers and car campers have more room to work with, but everyone should consider how the tent and its parts pack up for stowage.
  • Design:
    Tents come in various designs. Freestanding tents can stand alone without stakes or guy lines and can be easily moved or have dirt and other debris shaken out without being disassembled, though they still need to be staked out. Rounded, geodesic domes are stable and able to withstand heavy snow loads and wind. Tunnel tents are narrow and rectangular, and large family cabin tents are best for warm-weather campground outings.
  • Other features and specs to consider include single versus double-wall, ease of setup, stability, weather resistance, ventilation, , and any noteworthy features.
  • Read more in our guide to tents.