Tents and Shelters

Ready for a night out? Whether you’re an ultralight alpinist, family of backpackers, devoted hanger, or comfort camper, you'll find the best tents, tarps, and hammocks for your outdoor overnights right here.

Check out our top picks below—including price comparisons—to shelter you in any terrain, trip, or season: winter mountaineering, three-season thru-hiking, warm weather car camping, hammock hanging, alpine bivys, tarps, and emergency shelter.

Or you can browse our thousands of independent tent and shelter ratings and reviews by product type, brand, or price. Written by real-world hikers, backpackers, alpinists, climbers, and paddlers, Trailspace community reviews will help you select a dependable, field-tested, outdoor abode just right for your next adventure.

Learn more about how to choose a tent/shelter below »

Category

Four-Season
3-4 Season Convertible
Three-Season
Warm Weather
Bivy Sacks
Tarps and Shelters
Hammocks
Bug Nets
Accessories

Brand

Eagles Nest Outfitters
Hilleberg
MSR
Marmot
Grand Trunk
REI
EMS
Black Diamond
Kodiak Canvas
Eureka!

User

Unisex
Men's
Kids'

Price

less than $25
$25 - $49.99
$50 - $99.99
$100 - $199.99
$200 - $299.99
$300 - $399.99
$400 - $499.99
$500 and above

Recent Tent/Shelter Reviews

ALPS Mountaineering Mystique 2

rated 4.5 of 5 stars Awesome, light weighted tent Awesome, light weighted tent Loved it during my backpack hiking to Humboldt peak, colorado Full review

Six Moon Designs Deschutes

rated 4.5 of 5 stars This tarp is well made, spacious, and not difficult to pitch. It's essentially the more popular Lunar Solo, but without a floor/net. I've used this tarp on a thru-hike of the Colorado Trail, and in various trips in the Rockies, Ontario, Quebec, and the eastern U.S. It is easy to pitch, requiring one pole, and is well sewn so it's not terribly difficult to manage a taut pitch. It packs down very small, about the size of a Nalgene if necessary. Like all single-wall shelters, condensation can build… Full review

Outdoor Research Advanced Bivy

rated 5 of 5 stars Great bivy sack! I own the OR Advanced Bivy, which I purchased at REI in 2003. I LOVE it!  It came with me on a four-week backpack of the Hotsprings Trail in Central Idaho (Frank Church River of No Return Wilderness). On this trip, I used it inside the REI Quarter Dome for a few more degrees of temperature warmth, and rolled the whole shebang up (plain blue foam sleep pad, 0 degree bag, bivy), and strapped it to the bottom of the pack inside a black plastic bag. It really helped keep this girl… Full review

Kelty Noah's Tarp 12

rated 5 of 5 stars Excellent versatile tarp that is extremely rain and wind resistant. Every camper/backpacker should own at least one of these! I own this tarp in the 12' and 9' size and love them so much. They can be set up in so many different ways. There are guide loops along one diagonal seam if you want to string a rope through them. There are also loops along the edges to create a shelter in any situation. There are poles that can be purchased separately to prop up one or two corners to create a raised shelter… Full review

Oztent RV-5

rated 1 of 5 stars Reading the list of warranty exclusions on the website seems to indicate to me that the tent is actually not fit for purpose. Very poor stitching and webbing etc. is not hot cut or edge sealed The fabric is not breathable at all; the original Oz-Tent made from Australian woven poly/cotton Coredux canvas was very breathable and therefore comfortable in most weathers. It retails for a premium price and it is certainly quite expensive for the quality of the manufacture. As manufactured it is missing… Full review

Zpacks Solplex

rated 5 of 5 stars The Solplex is the most functional and spacious tent at around 1 pound. It has been my #1 favorite piece of gear for several years and my treasured home for two thru-hikes, going on three. If you are seeking a truly ultralight but full-protection shelter, this is it. Conditions: I purchased my Solplex spring of 2016. I have slept in it over 100 nights and it has been in my pack the length of New Zealand’s Te Araroa, the Colorado Trail, and approximately 10 days on both the Appalachian and Florida… Full review

REI Half Dome 2

rated 0.5 of 5 stars Terrible Quality Control. BAD RUNS IN NETTING THROUGHOUT TENT. Same situation with runs found on three different tents purchased "new" from store stock. Same problem but fewer runs on a 2017 model tent. I heard that returned defective tents were being returned to general merchandise stock. REI staff responded to situation with something between ignorance of the problem and indifference. Staff short-changed me on issuing a cash return. This review was posted on the REI website. They took it down… Full review

Big Agnes Copper Spur UL3

rated 4 of 5 stars This tent is cool for backpacking, especially if you go with others who will share it and share the load. It is super easy to set up and take down, though a little difficult to fit everything back into the bag. However I would only buy this for the purpose of backpacking with others to share the load cause it is UL and so sort of fragile.   It is really well ventilated and the design is otherwise great.   Full review

LightHeart Gear SoLong 6

rated 5 of 5 stars I was on my 82nd day of my thru hike of the Appalachian Trail when I had to leave the trail due to a death in the family. I will return to finish my hike on the Appalachian Trail after trail days in 2019 at mile marker 771. During this time, I learned more about my favourite pieces of gear starting with my tent, the LightHeart SoLong 6. This tent weighs 24oz supported by two 130cm trekking poles, has 10-inch bathtub base walls, two air vents on top of the tent, small and large vestibules with the… Full review

Top-Rated Tents and Shelters

Sort by: name | rating | price | availability | recently reviewed

user rating: 5 of 5 (109)
Eagles Nest Outfitters DoubleNest Hammock
$35 - $89
user rating: 5 of 5 (17)
Eagles Nest Outfitters Atlas Straps Hammock Accessory
$25 - $29
user rating: 5 of 5 (10)
Hilleberg Nallo 2 Four-Season Tent
$40 - $750
user rating: 5 of 5 (9)
MSR Hubba Hubba NX 2P Three-Season Tent
$300 - $399
user rating: 5 of 5 (8)
Hilleberg Soulo Four-Season Tent
$695
user rating: 5 of 5 (7)
Hilleberg Nammatj 3 GT Four-Season Tent
$1,040
user rating: 5 of 5 (7)
MSR E-Wing Tarp/Shelter
$100
user rating: 5 of 5 (6)
Marmot Limelight 4P Three-Season Tent
$250 - $379
user rating: 5 of 5 (6)
Grand Trunk Double Parachute Nylon Hammock Hammock
$65 - $74
user rating: 5 of 5 (4)
REI Passage 2 Tent Three-Season Tent
$159 - $275
user rating: 5 of 5 (3)
EMS Velocity 1 Tent Three-Season Tent
$269
user rating: 5 of 5 (3)
Black Diamond Mega Light Tarp/Shelter
$240 - $299
user rating: 5 of 5 (3)
MSR Elixir 3 Three-Season Tent
$225 - $299
user rating: 5 of 5 (3)
Kodiak Canvas 10x10 Flex-Bow Canvas Tent Deluxe Four-Season Tent
$550
user rating: 5 of 5 (3)
Hilleberg Kaitum 2 Four-Season Tent
$940
user rating: 5 of 5 (3)
Hilleberg Nallo 3 GT Four-Season Tent
$895
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (32)
Eagles Nest Outfitters SingleNest Hammock
$45 - $59
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (30)
Eureka! Apex 2XT Three-Season Tent
$77 - $139
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (28)
Eureka! Spitfire 1 Three-Season Tent
$140
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (28)
Mountain Hardwear Trango 2 Four-Season Tent
$650
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (23)
Eureka! K-2 XT Four-Season Tent
$500
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (22)
Marmot Limelight 3P Three-Season Tent
$208 - $299
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (22)
Eureka! Alpenlite XT Four-Season Tent
$370
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (22)
The North Face Mountain 25 Four-Season Tent
$530 - $589
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (21)
Eureka! Timberline 2 Three-Season Tent
$190
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (21)
Kelty Gunnison 2 Three-Season Tent
$190
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (21)
Big Agnes Seedhouse SL2 Three-Season Tent
$350
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (19)
Hilleberg Akto Four-Season Tent
$555
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (19)
Kelty Noah's Tarp 12 Tarp/Shelter
$48 - $69
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (18)
REI Half Dome 2 Plus Three-Season Tent
$229
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (18)
Hennessy Hammock Expedition Asym Hammock
$158
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (18)
Kelty Grand Mesa 2 Three-Season Tent
$99 - $139
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (17)
Eureka! Timberline 4 Three-Season Tent
$240
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (16)
Sierra Designs Light Year 1 Three-Season Tent
$170
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (15)
Hennessy Hammock Ultralight Backpacker Asym Hammock
$250
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (14)
ALPS Mountaineering Zephyr 2 Three-Season Tent
$130 - $219
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (14)
Big Agnes Copper Spur UL3 Three-Season Tent
$450
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (13)
NEMO Losi 3P Three-Season Tent
$400
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (12)
MSR Groundhog Tent Stakes Stake
$3 - $19
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (12)
Eagles Nest Outfitters Guardian Bug Net Hammock Accessory
$45 - $59
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (12)
NEMO Morpho AR Three-Season Tent
$279
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (11)
Big Agnes Copper Spur UL2 Three-Season Tent
$380
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (10)
Kelty Noah's Tarp 9 Tarp/Shelter
$60
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (10)
Eureka! Timberline SQ Outfitter 6 Three-Season Tent
$580
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (10)
Eureka! Assault Outfitter 4 Four-Season Tent
$374 - $479
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (9)
Kelty Salida 2 Three-Season Tent
$120 - $149
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (9)
Mountain Hardwear Viperine 2 Three-Season Tent
$299
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (9)
REI Camp Dome 2 Three-Season Tent
$100 - $239
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (8)
Big Agnes Big House 4 Three-Season Tent
$209 - $329
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (8)
Kelty Gunnison 4 Three-Season Tent
$280
Page 1 of 80:  1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9  Next » 

What’s the “best” tent or shelter for you? Consider your personal outdoor needs, preferences, and budget:

  • Conditions:
    First, and most important, in what seasons, conditions, and terrain will you use your tent, tarp, or hammock? Choose a shelter that can handle the conditions you expect to encounter (rain, snow, wind, heat, humidity, biting insects, an energetic scout troop), but don’t buy more tent than you truly need, and don’t expect one tent to do it all.
  • Capacity:
    Tents are typically classified by sleeping capacity (i.e. one-person, two-person, etc). However, a tent's stated sleeping capacity usually does not include much (or any) space for your gear and there’s no sizing standard between tent manufacturers. Some users size up.
  • Livability:
    Will you use the tent as a basecamp or is it an emergency shelter only? To determine if you and your gear will fit, look at the shelter’s dimensions, including floor and vestibule square areas, height and headroom (including at the sides), plus the number and placement of doors, gear lofts, and pockets, to assess personal livability, comfort, and footprint.
  • Weight and Packed Size:
    If you’ll be backpacking, climbing, cycling, or otherwise carrying that shelter, consider its weight, packed size (and your pack it needs to fit in), and its space-to-weight ratio before automatically opting for the bigger tent. Paddlers and car campers have more room to work with, but everyone should consider how the tent and its parts pack up for stowage.
  • Design:
    Tents come in various designs. Freestanding tents can stand alone without stakes or guy lines and can be easily moved or have dirt and other debris shaken out without being disassembled, though they still need to be staked out. Rounded, geodesic domes are stable and able to withstand heavy snow loads and wind. Tunnel tents are narrow and rectangular, and large family cabin tents are best for warm-weather campground outings.
  • Other features and specs to consider include single versus double-wall, ease of setup, stability, weather resistance, ventilation, , and any noteworthy features.
  • Read more in our guide to tents.