Tents and Shelters

Ready for a night out? Whether you’re an ultralight alpinist, family of backpackers, devoted hanger, or comfort camper, you'll find the best tents, tarps, and hammocks for your outdoor overnights right here.

Check out our top picks below—including price comparisons—to shelter you in any terrain, trip, or season: winter mountaineering, three-season thru-hiking, warm weather car camping, hammock hanging, alpine bivys, tarps, and emergency shelter.

Or you can browse our thousands of independent tent and shelter ratings and reviews by product type, brand, or price. Written by real-world hikers, backpackers, alpinists, climbers, and paddlers, Trailspace community reviews will help you select a dependable, field-tested, outdoor abode just right for your next adventure.

Learn more about how to choose a tent/shelter below »

Categories

Four-Season
3-4 Season Convertible
Three-Season
Warm Weather
Bivy Sacks
Tarps and Shelters
Hammocks
Accessories

Brands

Eagles Nest Outfitters
Eureka!
NEMO
Terra Nova
Hilleberg
MSR
REI
L.L.Bean
Marmot
Black Diamond

Price

less than $25
$25 - $49.99
$50 - $99.99
$100 - $199.99
$200 - $299.99
$300 - $399.99
$400 - $499.99
$500 and above

Recent Tent/Shelter Reviews

NEMO Meta 1P

rated 4.5 of 5 stars Excellent light weight tent and a good price. I purchased this tent from a reputable outfitter for $175.  It came with all guy lines, 6 stakes, and footprint.  There is a slight learning curve to setting up but after just two setups I have no problem erecting the tent in under 2 minutes if I'm in a hurry.  I am able to pitch the tent very tautly.  I have used this tent a total of 8 times now and would highly recommend it for any three-season use.  It has handled extremely well in various… Full review

Sierra Designs Flashlight 2

rated 2 of 5 stars Great concept that needs more work. I bought this tent after reviewing various choices online. I had also owned the previous Flashlight and really like it. When I set the tent up I immediately realized that there is a serious design problem. The issue is that it is impossible to get a taut pitch on the tent body. Since this also incorporates the "fly" in that it is a single wall roof, the tent droops and sags and there are depressions in the fabric in the lower part of the roof that will be susceptible… Full review

Eureka! Pinnacle Pass 3XTA

rated 4 of 5 stars This is a great light enough to pack tent, but built to do it all. Huge vestibules on both sides provide room for gear and to cook if needed. This is my go-to tent when I am going to the woods and don't want to be concerned no matter the weather forecast. Easy to set up by yourself and easy to pack in and out of any location. Great space with vestibules on both sides of the tent.  Full review

Eagles Nest Outfitters DoubleNest

rated 4 of 5 stars A versatile, portable, comfortable and easily accessible option for overnight sleeping or just a quick rest. Compresses to a size slightly larger than a grapefruit. With more than 100 reviews on Trailspace and almost all of them receiving either a 4 or 5-star rating, I think that goes to show this product is pretty well liked, easily accessible and performs well. There isn't a lot that I can add to the numerous reviews from people who have spent more time in their ENO DoubleNest than I have. You… Full review

The North Face Nebula Tent

rated 5 of 5 stars This is the most versatile, spacious, lightweight tent period. I bought my Nebula tent 15 years ago in London. I traveled extensively and camped in Canada's National Parks for 30 days. I have used it all over in Africa as well and it stood up to all the weather. It is very easy to pitch, even for one person; 10 min at a relaxed pace. I use a reflective ground sheet to protect the tent and as extra space outside the entrances of the tent. Stability is great and no problems with condensation because… Full review

Walrus Armadillio

rated 5 of 5 stars These tents are awesome. They withstood weather when others were snapping poles and going down! I highly recommend them. I've had mine for ten years. I've never had any problem with the Walrus tent. I've owned the Armidillo and it's withstood weather conditions like no others could where I camped. Zipper claps wore out as normal, but it was up for ten days at a time during the summer when camping so it took a lot of use. Rain cover is worn so I'm looking for a replacement, but the tent is in great… Full review

Big Agnes Copper Spur UL2

rated 4 of 5 stars Very lightweight and great for solo or two-person backpacking. Overall, I really like this tent so far. It is light and packs up quite small and is also quite easy to set up. The first time I set it up was in light rain, and it was quick enough to set up that the inside did not get wet at all. The poles are pretty easy to set up, though I'm a little concerned that the 3-way junction might be a site for future weakness, but it's a little to early to say for sure.  So far I have only used the tent… Full review

Black Diamond HiLight

rated 5 of 5 stars I was in a rainstorm from 3 a.m. to 10 a.m. (7 hrs). I expected to be wet and my gear soaked. On the contrary, I stayed dry during a 7-hr downpour of rain. I did not want to get out of the tent, because temperatures were in the mid-30's. I was afraid if I got soaked, hypothermia might set in. I stayed warm and dry during this downpour. Further up the trail I ran into snow. I'm glad I had the Black Diamond Hi-light tent to keep me dry and warm! I was out doing a solo backpacking trip when I got caught… Full review

Mountainsmith Mountain Shelter LT

rated 4 of 5 stars Basic shelter at a basic price. The Mountainsmith Mountain Shelter LT sets up with trekking poles, which means it is light, about 2 pounds, and packs into a small, compressible bag. There is plenty of room inside for two hikers and their gear. At just over a hundred dollars it costs much less than most options on the market. The I set the the shelter up it took for ever and was frustrating. This is what you get from reading the instructions on the side of the stuff bag. I watched Mountainsmith's… Full review

Top-Rated Tents and Shelters

Sort by: name | rating | price | availability | recently reviewed

Eagles Nest Outfitters DoubleNest
user rating: 5 of 5 (105)
Eagles Nest Outfitters
DoubleNest
Hammock
$62 - $89
Eureka! Alpenlite XT
user rating: 5 of 5 (21)
Eureka!
Alpenlite XT
Four-Season Tent
$315 - $349
Eagles Nest Outfitters Atlas Hammock Suspension System
user rating: 5 of 5 (15)
Eagles Nest Outfitters
Atlas Hammock Suspension System
Hammock Accessory
$27 - $29
NEMO Morpho AR
user rating: 5 of 5 (11)
NEMO
Morpho AR
Three-Season Tent
$320
Terra Nova Ultra Quasar
user rating: 5 of 5 (9)
Terra Nova
Ultra Quasar
Four-Season Tent
$576
Hilleberg Nallo 2
user rating: 5 of 5 (9)
Hilleberg
Nallo 2
Four-Season Tent
$685
Terra Nova Super Quasar
user rating: 5 of 5 (6)
Terra Nova
Super Quasar
Four-Season Tent
$704
Eagles Nest Outfitters ProFly Rain Tarp
user rating: 5 of 5 (6)
Eagles Nest Outfitters
ProFly Rain Tarp
Tarp/Shelter
$70 - $79
Hilleberg Soulo
user rating: 5 of 5 (6)
Hilleberg
Soulo
Four-Season Tent
$645
NEMO Losi 2P
user rating: 5 of 5 (6)
NEMO
Losi 2P
Three-Season Tent
$320 - $369
MSR E-Wing
user rating: 5 of 5 (5)
MSR
E-Wing
Tarp/Shelter
$154 - $174
REI Kingdom 6 Tent
user rating: 5 of 5 (4)
REI
Kingdom 6 Tent
$439
L.L.Bean Microlight 2
user rating: 5 of 5 (4)
L.L.Bean
Microlight 2
Three-Season Tent
$239
Marmot Limelight 4P
user rating: 5 of 5 (4)
Marmot
Limelight 4P
Three-Season Tent
$314 - $369
Black Diamond Mega Light
user rating: 5 of 5 (3)
Black Diamond
Mega Light
Tarp/Shelter
$223 - $269
Hilleberg Nammatj 3 GT
user rating: 5 of 5 (3)
Hilleberg
Nammatj 3 GT
Four-Season Tent
$865
Hilleberg Kaitum 2
user rating: 5 of 5 (3)
Hilleberg
Kaitum 2
Four-Season Tent
$835 - $984
Hilleberg Nallo 3 GT
user rating: 5 of 5 (3)
Hilleberg
Nallo 3 GT
Four-Season Tent
$830
ALPS Mountaineering Lynx 2 AL
user rating: 5 of 5 (3)
ALPS Mountaineering
Lynx 2 AL
Three-Season Tent
$110
REI Half Dome 2
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (31)
REI
Half Dome 2
Three-Season Tent
$189
Eagles Nest Outfitters SingleNest
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (30)
Eagles Nest Outfitters
SingleNest
Hammock
$53 - $84
The North Face Rock 22
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (30)
The North Face
Rock 22
Three-Season Tent
$198
MSR Hubba
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (27)
MSR
Hubba
Three-Season Tent
$280 - $339
Eureka! Apex 2XT
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (27)
Eureka!
Apex 2XT
Three-Season Tent
$120 - $149
Mountain Hardwear Trango 2
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (25)
Mountain Hardwear
Trango 2
Four-Season Tent
$420 - $600
Eureka! Spitfire 1
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (24)
Eureka!
Spitfire 1
Three-Season Tent
$110 - $129
Marmot Limelight 2P
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (21)
Marmot
Limelight 2P
Three-Season Tent
$160 - $219
The North Face Mountain 25
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (21)
The North Face
Mountain 25
Four-Season Tent
$417 - $539
Eureka! K2 XT
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (20)
Eureka!
K2 XT
Four-Season Tent
$384
Kelty Gunnison 2
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (20)
Kelty
Gunnison 2
Three-Season Tent
$220
REI Taj 3
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (19)
REI
Taj 3
Three-Season Tent
$240
Hennessy Hammock Expedition Asym
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (18)
Hennessy Hammock
Expedition Asym
Hammock
$144 - $159
Eureka! Timberline 2
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (17)
Eureka!
Timberline 2
Three-Season Tent
$149
Eureka! Timberline 4
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (15)
Eureka!
Timberline 4
Three-Season Tent
$190 - $219
Big Agnes Seedhouse SL2
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (15)
Big Agnes
Seedhouse SL2
Three-Season Tent
$340 - $349
Kelty Grand Mesa 2
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (15)
Kelty
Grand Mesa 2
Three-Season Tent
$112 - $239
Hilleberg Akto
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (14)
Hilleberg
Akto
Four-Season Tent
$498
Marmot Limelight 3P
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (14)
Marmot
Limelight 3P
Three-Season Tent
$237 - $279
REI Half Dome 2 Plus
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (13)
REI
Half Dome 2 Plus
Three-Season Tent
$219
Kelty Noah's Tarp 12
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (13)
Kelty
Noah's Tarp 12
Tarp/Shelter
$60 - $99
MSR Groundhog Tent Stake
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (12)
MSR
Groundhog Tent Stake
Stake
$2 - $19
Hennessy Hammock Ultralight Backpacker Asym
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (12)
Hennessy Hammock
Ultralight Backpacker Asym
Hammock
$240
Eagles Nest Outfitters Guardian Bug Net
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (12)
Eagles Nest Outfitters
Guardian Bug Net
Hammock
$49 - $59
Sierra Designs Lightning 2
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (11)
Sierra Designs
Lightning 2
Three-Season Tent
$221 - $259
NEMO Losi 3P
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (10)
NEMO
Losi 3P
Three-Season Tent
$350
Kelty Gunnison 2.1
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (10)
Kelty
Gunnison 2.1
Three-Season Tent
$200 - $219
REI Quarter Dome T3
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (9)
REI
Quarter Dome T3
Three-Season Tent
$270
REI Hobitat 4
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (9)
REI
Hobitat 4
Three-Season Tent
$220
Big Agnes Big House 4
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (8)
Big Agnes
Big House 4
Three-Season Tent
$230 - $299
ALPS Mountaineering Zephyr 2.0
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (8)
ALPS Mountaineering
Zephyr 2.0
Three-Season Tent
$220
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What’s the “best” tent or shelter for you? Consider your personal outdoor needs, preferences, and budget:

  • Conditions:
    First, and most important, in what seasons, conditions, and terrain will you use your tent, tarp, or hammock? Choose a shelter that can handle the conditions you expect to encounter (rain, snow, wind, heat, humidity, biting insects, an energetic scout troop), but don’t buy more tent than you truly need, and don’t expect one tent to do it all.
  • Capacity:
    Tents are typically classified by sleeping capacity (i.e. one-person, two-person, etc). However, a tent's stated sleeping capacity usually does not include much (or any) space for your gear and there’s no sizing standard between tent manufacturers. Some users size up.
  • Livability:
    Will you use the tent as a basecamp or is it an emergency shelter only? To determine if you and your gear will fit, look at the shelter’s dimensions, including floor and vestibule square areas, height and headroom (including at the sides), plus the number and placement of doors, gear lofts, and pockets, to assess personal livability, comfort, and footprint.
  • Weight and Packed Size:
    If you’ll be backpacking, climbing, cycling, or otherwise carrying that shelter, consider its weight, packed size (and your pack it needs to fit in), and its space-to-weight ratio before automatically opting for the bigger tent. Paddlers and car campers have more room to work with, but everyone should consider how the tent and its parts pack up for stowage.
  • Design:
    Tents come in various designs. Freestanding tents can stand alone without stakes or guy lines and can be easily moved or have dirt and other debris shaken out without being disassembled, though they still need to be staked out. Rounded, geodesic domes are stable and able to withstand heavy snow loads and wind. Tunnel tents are narrow and rectangular, and large family cabin tents are best for warm-weather campground outings.
  • Other features and specs to consider include single versus double-wall, ease of setup, stability, weather resistance, ventilation, , and any noteworthy features.
  • Read more in our guide to tents.