Tents and Shelters

Ready for a night out? Whether you’re an ultralight alpinist, family of backpackers, devoted hanger, or comfort camper, you'll find the best tents, tarps, and hammocks for your outdoor overnights right here.

Check out our top picks below—including price comparisons—to shelter you in any terrain, trip, or season: winter mountaineering, three-season thru-hiking, warm weather car camping, hammock hanging, alpine bivys, tarps, and emergency shelter.

Or you can browse our thousands of independent tent and shelter ratings and reviews by product type, brand, or price. Written by real-world hikers, backpackers, alpinists, climbers, and paddlers, Trailspace community reviews will help you select a dependable, field-tested, outdoor abode just right for your next adventure.

Learn more about how to choose a tent/shelter below »

Categories

Four-Season
3-4 Season Convertible
Three-Season
Warm Weather
Bivy Sacks
Tarps and Shelters
Hammocks
Bug Nets
Accessories

Brands

Eagles Nest Outfitters
NEMO
Hilleberg
MSR
Marmot
Grand Trunk
Sierra Designs
EMS
Black Diamond
ALPS Mountaineering

Genders

Unisex
Men's
Kids'

Price

less than $25
$25 - $49.99
$50 - $99.99
$100 - $199.99
$200 - $299.99
$300 - $399.99
$400 - $499.99
$500 and above

Recent Tent/Shelter Reviews

Miltec by Sturm One-Man Recon Tent

rated 3.5 of 5 stars Cool one-man tent from Germany. Miltec by Sturm of Germany one-man (berth) tent: This was given to me as a gift and I really like it. It's small, light, and packs down in my backpack just fine. Gives me a little more room than a bivy sack and is very well made. I have not seen any others here in the U.S. yet, but they are offered online. I do not like the fiberglass poles (past experiences) or cheap wire stakes it came with, but both have held up pretty well so far. I have used it off and on for… Full review

Eureka! ECWT

rated 5 of 5 stars AWESOME 4-man 4-season military issue tent. Eureka! ECWT (Extreme Cold Weather Tent) 4-man / 4-season with multiple fly colors: Woodland camo fly Snow "arctic" white fly Rare desert sand fly Aftermarket green fly Tent bodyRoof vent (from inside)Tent floor (and other views0 Storage bags with piecesYou can see all the specs for this at Eurekamilitarytents.com This has been one of my go-to tents for several years and I used it extensively. I own two at this time. I know a lot about these and can… Full review

Eureka! Combat Tent

rated 5 of 5 stars Military issue, 2-man combat tent. This is a Eureka 2-man USMC Combat Tent  You can find all of the specs for it at Eurekamilitarytents.com I have had three of these in the past and enjoyed them. They are roomy enough for two with gear, tough, durable, and have various colored flys. The one pictured is reversible from woodland camo to desert sand and then there is another that is OD green and desert sand. They come with 18 stakes... never used them all even in bad weather. The tent is heavy, but… Full review

Eureka! TCOP

rated 5 of 5 stars Eureka! TCOP (Tent, Combat One Person) military issue in woodland camo. I was working a side job for a guy in Oregon that owned a military surplus store. I agreed to work for half cash and half store credit. Once completed he owed me about $550 in gear. This one of the items I chose. I have had it about four years now and it is simply AWESOME! I picked out three tents total and will do a little review on each of them, the Eureka! military tents: TCOP (Tent, Combat One Person), two-man USMC Combat… Full review

Garuda Jalan Jalan

rated 5 of 5 stars Great tent for solo backpacking. Solid construction and durability. Wow...I came across my first review I posted in 1999. I still have and love my Garuda Jalan Jalan. It's been solid for 22 years. It still remains for me the best investment in gear I've made. Its wear is minimal and I haven't had to reseal any seams since I first painstakingly sealed them 1994. Full review

Coleman Sundome 2

rated 4 of 5 stars Great bang for the buck. I paid around $40 for this tent. I use it on my motorcycle. It packs small but the 5'x7' floor space is great for me and my gear. This tent can be set up in less than 10 minutes. I've been out in some windy areas and the held up fine. In wet weather as long as you don't get against the sides you're fine.  If it had a larger rain fly this would not be an issue. The Sundome 2 has large vents at the top and a half door vent, never had problem condensation. With the 5'x7' floor… Full review

NEMO Veda 2P

rated 2.5 of 5 stars Liked the light weight, and the fact that it had a floor in a trekking pole tent. Found out on night one that the tent was not waterproof, and the tent did not breathe well. I took the Nemo Veda 2p on a 10-day sheep hunt with a partner. We found out night 1 that the seams leaked and even some of the fabric was leaking through. Luckily this would be the only night that we would see rain. Not the only night we woke up wet, the tent's single wall gathered enough condensation to wet out our bags. The… Full review

Sierra Designs Sirius 2

rated 5 of 5 stars Three-season tent with plenty of room for two people, or one and all gear. Great for backpackers, car campers, or canoe campers. Best for those looking for a good product at a reasonable price. This is the easiest tent I've ever pitched. The poles all snap together easily, and are all connected in advance so there is no guesswork. The tent snaps easily to the poles, and the fly buckles on. The tent can easily be pitched in under two minutes. The tent has been stable and comfortable both in good… Full review

Integral Designs Unishelter

rated 4 of 5 stars I prefer a tent to a bivy but this is the best bivy I've ever used! Easy to climb into. Comfortable to read in. Light and packs small. Setup is as simple as it gets with any bivy. The one pole on this guy requires staking for it to be effective but once it's set up, the mesh stays off your face and there is plenty of room for reading comfortably. In warm, heavily mosquito'd areas you can leave the mesh open all night without walking up looking like you have small pox.  Completely waterproof —… Full review

Top-Rated Tents and Shelters

Sort by: name | rating | price | availability | recently reviewed

user rating: 5 of 5 (108)
Eagles Nest Outfitters DoubleNest Hammock
$52 - $89
user rating: 5 of 5 (15)
Eagles Nest Outfitters Atlas Straps Hammock Accessory
$22 - $39
user rating: 5 of 5 (11)
NEMO Morpho AR Three-Season Tent
$390
user rating: 5 of 5 (10)
Hilleberg Nallo 2 Four-Season Tent
$735
user rating: 5 of 5 (7)
Hilleberg Soulo Four-Season Tent
$685
user rating: 5 of 5 (7)
MSR E-Wing Tarp/Shelter
$100 - $174
user rating: 5 of 5 (6)
Hilleberg Nammatj 3 GT Four-Season Tent
$979
user rating: 5 of 5 (6)
Eagles Nest Outfitters ProFly Rain Tarp Tarp/Shelter
$80 - $99
user rating: 5 of 5 (5)
Marmot Limelight 4P Three-Season Tent
$369
user rating: 5 of 5 (5)
Grand Trunk Double Parachute Nylon Hammock Hammock
$65 - $74
user rating: 5 of 5 (4)
Sierra Designs Lightning 2 FL Three-Season Tent
$380
user rating: 5 of 5 (3)
EMS Velocity 1 Tent Three-Season Tent
$215
user rating: 5 of 5 (3)
Black Diamond Mega Light Tarp/Shelter
$260 - $289
user rating: 5 of 5 (3)
Hilleberg Kaitum 2 Four-Season Tent
$885
user rating: 5 of 5 (3)
Hilleberg Nallo 3 GT Four-Season Tent
$885
user rating: 5 of 5 (3)
ALPS Mountaineering Lynx 2 AL Three-Season Tent
$140
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (37)
REI Half Dome 2 Three-Season Tent
$199
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (32)
Eagles Nest Outfitters SingleNest Hammock
$45 - $59
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (30)
Eureka! Apex 2XT Three-Season Tent
$90 - $139
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (28)
Eureka! Spitfire 1 Three-Season Tent
$118
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (28)
Mountain Hardwear Trango 2 Four-Season Tent
$600 - $650
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (28)
MSR Hubba Three-Season Tent
$280
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (22)
Eureka! Alpenlite XT Four-Season Tent
$310 - $369
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (22)
The North Face Mountain 25 Four-Season Tent
$589
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (22)
Eureka! K-2 XT Four-Season Tent
$500
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (21)
Big Agnes Seedhouse SL2 Three-Season Tent
$262 - $349
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (20)
Eureka! Timberline 2 Three-Season Tent
$144 - $189
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (20)
Big Agnes Fly Creek UL2 Three-Season Tent
$280 - $349
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (19)
Marmot Limelight 3P Three-Season Tent
$224 - $299
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (18)
Hilleberg Akto Four-Season Tent
$530
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (18)
Kelty Noah's Tarp 12 Tarp/Shelter
$51 - $69
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (18)
Kelty Grand Mesa 2 Three-Season Tent
$105 - $139
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (17)
Eureka! Timberline 4 Three-Season Tent
$184 - $239
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (16)
REI Half Dome 2 Plus Three-Season Tent
$219
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (14)
ALPS Mountaineering Zephyr 2.0 Three-Season Tent
$140
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (14)
Hennessy Hammock Ultralight Backpacker Asym Hammock
$250
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (13)
Mountain Hardwear Hammerhead 2 Three-Season Tent
$225
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (12)
MSR Groundhog Tent Stake Stake
$3 - $19
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (12)
Eagles Nest Outfitters Guardian Bug Net Hammock Accessory
$45 - $59
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (12)
Big Agnes Copper Spur UL3 Three-Season Tent
$400 - $499
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (10)
Eureka! Timberline SQ Outfitter 6 Three-Season Tent
$550
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (10)
Eureka! Assault Outfitter 4 Four-Season Tent
$450 - $479
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (9)
Kelty Noah's Tarp 9 Tarp/Shelter
$60
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (9)
Mountain Hardwear Light Wedge 2 Three-Season Tent
$290
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (8)
Big Agnes Big House 4 Three-Season Tent
$264 - $374
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (8)
Big Agnes Big House 6 Three-Season Tent
$320 - $399
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (8)
REI Camp Dome 2 Three-Season Tent
$100 - $199
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (8)
Big Agnes Copper Spur UL1 Three-Season Tent
$304 - $379
user rating: 5 of 5 (2)
Hyperlite Mountain Gear Flat Tarp Tarp/Shelter
$300
user rating: 5 of 5 (2)
MSR Elixir 3 Three-Season Tent
$300
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What’s the “best” tent or shelter for you? Consider your personal outdoor needs, preferences, and budget:

  • Conditions:
    First, and most important, in what seasons, conditions, and terrain will you use your tent, tarp, or hammock? Choose a shelter that can handle the conditions you expect to encounter (rain, snow, wind, heat, humidity, biting insects, an energetic scout troop), but don’t buy more tent than you truly need, and don’t expect one tent to do it all.
  • Capacity:
    Tents are typically classified by sleeping capacity (i.e. one-person, two-person, etc). However, a tent's stated sleeping capacity usually does not include much (or any) space for your gear and there’s no sizing standard between tent manufacturers. Some users size up.
  • Livability:
    Will you use the tent as a basecamp or is it an emergency shelter only? To determine if you and your gear will fit, look at the shelter’s dimensions, including floor and vestibule square areas, height and headroom (including at the sides), plus the number and placement of doors, gear lofts, and pockets, to assess personal livability, comfort, and footprint.
  • Weight and Packed Size:
    If you’ll be backpacking, climbing, cycling, or otherwise carrying that shelter, consider its weight, packed size (and your pack it needs to fit in), and its space-to-weight ratio before automatically opting for the bigger tent. Paddlers and car campers have more room to work with, but everyone should consider how the tent and its parts pack up for stowage.
  • Design:
    Tents come in various designs. Freestanding tents can stand alone without stakes or guy lines and can be easily moved or have dirt and other debris shaken out without being disassembled, though they still need to be staked out. Rounded, geodesic domes are stable and able to withstand heavy snow loads and wind. Tunnel tents are narrow and rectangular, and large family cabin tents are best for warm-weather campground outings.
  • Other features and specs to consider include single versus double-wall, ease of setup, stability, weather resistance, ventilation, , and any noteworthy features.
  • Read more in our guide to tents.