Hiking and Camping Gear

Find the best hiking, backpacking, and camping gear and outdoor essentials right here. We’ve got your ultimate gear list covered for your next day, weekend, or thru-hike trip, whether you're hitting the backcountry or the local frontcountry.

See our top hike and camp gear picks, including price comparisons, in any outdoor product category: backpacks to tents, sleeping bags to pads, camp stoves to cookware and food, knives to multi-tools, lights to navigation and electronics, trekking poles to water treatment, even dog gear. 

Browse thousands of independent equipment reviews and ratings by real hikers, backpackers, alpinists, and paddlers, to select appropriate, dependable, field-tested gear for your next adventure.

Learn more about how to choose hiking and camping gear below »

10 Essentials for Backcountry Travel

While a comprehensive hiking, backpacking, or camping gear list depends on many factors (season, climate, terrain, distance, activities, and personal preference), certain outdoor gear is essential whether you’re exploring the trails in your local woods or heading off on an extended backcountry climb or ski.

Wherever you're going, always bring appropriate hiking and outdoor gear for each of the 10 Essentials:

  1. Navigation
  2. Sun protection
  3. Insulation (extra clothing)
  4. Illumination (lights)
  5. First-aid supplies
  6. Fire (starters)
  7. Repair kit and tools
  8. Nutrition (extra food)
  9. Hydration (extra water)
  10. Emergency shelter

Read more on the 10 Essentials.

Recent Hiking/Camping Product Reviews

Trail Designs Sidewinder Ti-Tri

rated 5 of 5 stars After 30 years I have finally found a stove I can enjoy. I have been through Bluet canisters, various white gas and multifuel, Jetboil, Sierra zip stoves, and others but this one does the trick for me. Excellent with alcohol and wood burning modes. To be honest, I haven't even tried the esbit mode yet. If you just want a quick boil with no fuss consider the alcohol version only. I absolutely love the Sidewinder Ti Tri. I am not a fan of freeze dried meals for the most part, so usually simmer cook… Full review

Mountain Hardwear Scrambler 30

rated 3 of 5 stars This backpack wasn't bad. It wasn't my favourite, but I also didn't hate it either. Great pack for wet hiking conditions, a winter snowshoe hike, or an all weather commuter. As I mentioned in the summary, I don't dislike this pack. But I was also happy to return to use my old faithful. Though the waterproofing is great, and I wish my other pack was waterproof. I took this bag on two solid day hikes of waterfalling and a canoe trip and one thing is for sure — the main compartment is definitely… Full review

Marmot Men's Helium

rated 5 of 5 stars Lightweight, super warm, 3-season sleeping bag. 15 degrees, super comfortable and warm 850 fill down. Best used for camping/backpacking in the fall/winter time. Definitely would recommend if you enjoy being warm and comfortable. This bag is really amazing, I've used it in the low 20s and it worked perfectly. I think the comfort rating is around 20 degrees and the lower rating is 16. I spent 10 days on my sleeping pad only in the backcountry of Moab, Utah. I was wearing layers and warm hat, and a… Full review

Deuter Futura 32

rated 5 of 5 stars Great pack! Very comfortable and functional. My back stayed pretty dry, despite some warm conditions on long day hikes in the Grand Canyon, recently. Purchased this pack recently to use on some long day hikes, with a few overnighters on occasion. I just came back from a week of camping at the Grand Canyon, with some long day hikes taken every day. Each day I packed a full hydration bladder, a liter of Gatorade, snacks, first aid kit, and a light jacket. Everything fit perfectly, though when the… Full review

Ozark Trail 40F Mummy Sleeping Bag

rated 3 of 5 stars I used this bag two nights last weekend and found it was too cold on its own—lowest temp was 51 degrees each of those nights. I agree with almost everything commented by Eric. I prefer a cool sleeping environment. However, I used this bag two nights last weekend and found it was too cold on its own—lowest temp was 51 degrees each of those nights. I was in a large tent (admittedly, a smaller tent would have been better) with one other person. I had to add a fleece sleeping bag for more insulation. Full review

Eureka! Timberline 2

rated 1 of 5 stars We have purchased Timberline tents for our Boy Scout troop in the past and found them useful, easy to set up, and good quality (lasting many years). However, the last purchase of eight tents in 2013, was a disaster. Eureka changed the zippers — and they won't stay closed. The teeth on the zippers don't hold, and if you pull the zipper just right, and manage to close the zipper, it pulls open with a very light pull (even the wind will open it). Simply, they won't stay shut! We're now looking for… Full review

Mountain Hardwear Snowtastic 28 Backpack

rated 3 of 5 stars The Mountain Hardwear Snowtastic 28 pack is a good idea that just wasn't executed very well. Some of the flaws can be fixed with very little time and money, others leave me scratching my head and asking "why did they choose to do it that way?" As far as carrying capacity, I'd say it's great for day trips, but accessing your stuff isn't the easiest. I bought the MH Snowtastic 28 because I want to get a little more adventurous in my snowshoeing this year, and my Camelbak pack doesn't hold much more… Full review