Stephenson's Warmlite Double Wall Tent feedback

8:10 p.m. on January 31, 2002 (EST)
(Guest)

Does anyone out there have feedback on the Stephenson's Warmlite double wall tent? It's lightweight and sleeps two (or also comes in a bigger size). Want to know if anyone has tested it on the trails.

8:12 p.m. on February 4, 2002 (EST)
10 reviewer rep
485 forum posts

I'm assuming you are talking about their 2R. It is a double tent in the sleeping area and a single ply at the two ends.

I've used my 2R exclusively going on 4 years now. Been in cold (-20F), snow (36" 12 hrs), rain(5" two days) and wind (woooweee). No problems. Would have been a lot more comfortable in the 3R on the two day rain and in an on and off 3 day blizzard.

Some condensation at the head end almost every night especially if two people - and zipped up. Not so much to worry about so long as you expect to get a wet face in the morning. First one up and out uses a quick wipe with a small rag and its dry enough to stuff (unless still raining) by the time we're ready to pack out.

I thought I was going to have a footprint problem (its big - but then that's why you buy it right?), but only have had a problem when camping with a group of tents...by the time I get there all the big spots are taken.

It is a thinking person's tent. If you are an incidious klutz or don't want to take care of your gear, I'd search else where. The poles are fragile until strung together and up in the tent sleeves. The tent material has held up well.

It is easy to set up underroutine conditions. Only three stakes gets it up faster than all but the pop ups. We've used our trek poles successfully as stakes in the summer. It is easy to maintain tautness from the inside. We were kept awake for two days while a V24 next to us flapped in the wind. Ours didn't even hum.

The seam sealing is a means to get you some real quality time with your tent early on. They won't seal it, leaving it up to you. Instructions and goop (GE Silicon II) they provide work just fine. Also they do not provide a footprint or stakes. The footprint is easy. Just cut out a chunk of your favorite material that is about 1" less than the pitched size of the floor. I'd suggest the cheapest lightest weight material. It is fully waterproofed so you only have to worry about abrasion.

I'd suggest a yellow tent if you are unsure of a color. I'd skip the light green (pea soup) that I have. I have the barndoor windows, which are great...but I don't use them that much. They do provide a great deal of extra storage for your gear out of the weather. You can use your trek poles (if not as stakes) to hold them up. It is extra weight, but they are completely waterproof even when extended.

If I had to do it again, I'd probably get the 3R - its about a pound more. I would guess it may have better air circulation too. On the 2R you sometimes plug up the bottom narrow end of the tent with gear or sleeping bags. There has been a few times when we could have saved the weight of an extra tent with three people. And it is nice to be able to have two exits, especially if you do a lot of winter backpacking. It also comes with an extra pole set for heavy snow and cross bracing for winds up to 125mph or so.
If you are going to be out there in luxury, you might as well really laud it on with the extra size...I think the swimming pool and bowling alley are still offered as options.

It packs about the size of two wine bottles cork to bunt. Mine weighs about 2lb 13 oz with 7 stakes, groundcloth, tent , poles and bag. Not one of those tents you would give parts to another to carry because of weight.

8:12 p.m. on February 4, 2002 (EST)
10 reviewer rep
485 forum posts

I'm assuming you are talking about their 2R. It is a double tent in the sleeping area and a single ply at the two ends.

I've used my 2R exclusively going on 4 years now. Been in cold (-20F), snow (36" 12 hrs), rain(5" two days) and wind (woooweee). No problems. Would have been a lot more comfortable in the 3R on the two day rain and in an on and off 3 day blizzard.

Some condensation at the head end almost every night especially if two people - and zipped up. Not so much to worry about so long as you expect to get a wet face in the morning. First one up and out uses a quick wipe with a small rag and its dry enough to stuff (unless still raining) by the time we're ready to pack out.

I thought I was going to have a footprint problem (its big - but then that's why you buy it right?), but only have had a problem when camping with a group of tents...by the time I get there all the big spots are taken.

It is a thinking person's tent. If you are an incidious klutz or don't want to take care of your gear, I'd search else where. The poles are fragile until strung together and up in the tent sleeves. The tent material has held up well.

It is easy to set up underroutine conditions. Only three stakes gets it up faster than all but the pop ups. We've used our trek poles successfully as stakes in the summer. It is easy to maintain tautness from the inside. We were kept awake for two days while a V24 next to us flapped in the wind. Ours didn't even hum.

The seam sealing is a means to get you some real quality time with your tent early on. They won't seal it, leaving it up to you. Instructions and goop (GE Silicon II) they provide work just fine. Also they do not provide a footprint or stakes. The footprint is easy. Just cut out a chunk of your favorite material that is about 1" less than the pitched size of the floor. I'd suggest the cheapest lightest weight material. It is fully waterproofed so you only have to worry about abrasion.

I'd suggest a yellow tent if you are unsure of a color. I'd skip the light green (pea soup) that I have. I have the barndoor windows, which are great...but I don't use them that much. They do provide a great deal of extra storage for your gear out of the weather. You can use your trek poles (if not as stakes) to hold them up. It is extra weight, but they are completely waterproof even when extended.

If I had to do it again, I'd probably get the 3R - its about a pound more. I would guess it may have better air circulation too. On the 2R you sometimes plug up the bottom narrow end of the tent with gear or sleeping bags. There has been a few times when we could have saved the weight of an extra tent with three people. And it is nice to be able to have two exits, especially if you do a lot of winter backpacking. It also comes with an extra pole set for heavy snow and cross bracing for winds up to 125mph or so.
If you are going to be out there in luxury, you might as well really laud it on with the extra size...I think the swimming pool and bowling alley are still offered as options.

It packs about the size of two wine bottles cork to bunt. Mine weighs about 2lb 13 oz with 7 stakes, groundcloth, tent , poles and bag. Not one of those tents you would give parts to another to carry because of weight.

3:47 p.m. on March 7, 2002 (EST)
(Guest)

Hyker:
Hope it's not too late and you've bought some second rate brand. In other words, the 2r is an awesome shelter, working just as good as Stephenson leads you to believe. I agree with everything SPeacock stated, no need to repeat anything. One more very important detail though: because of the ultra thin material used, you really shouldn't leave this tent up during day light hours or the UV degradation is going to be fast and fatal.
The main attractions to me are light weight, 4 season reliability, super fast setup and roominess.
I'm from Scandinavia where 90% of the backcountry tents offered are of the tunnel type (not free standing) with the inner and outer sewn together for ease of setup in inclement conditions, so this concept is familiar to me and makes tons of sense. It is really the only way to make truly lightweight tents of exceptional strenght. It seems to me after working for years in the outdoor industry that the most important criteria to the average American tent shopper is 'free standing'. Selling anything else even to informed customers is next to impossible. Must be those expensive VE24 ads from the 80's?
I've had my 2r since 95 and spend 50+ nights in it, from rain in the Olympics, thunder in the Rockies to snow in the Sierras. Never seam sealed it, no leaks. I don't use a ground cloth and have minimal abrasion to the bottom. We always sleep two and a dog inside with all our gear and don't feel too cramped (me 6'4", her 5'8", him 60 lbs.). I have the lime green top, which I really like. I also have the zippered side wings or whatever they're called and used them once or twice on buggy nights in the desert. Save the money and weight if you're buing a mountain tent. I'm not getting them next time. The price is totally reasonable for a made to order custom tent of this quality.
9 on a 1-10 scale. Not a 10 because of some condensation.

Jan

 

Quote:

Does anyone out there have feedback on the Stephenson's Warmlite double wall tent? It's lightweight and sleeps two (or also comes in a bigger size). Want to know if anyone has tested it on the trails.

November 22, 2014
Quick Reply

Please sign in to reply

 
More Topics
This forum: Older: Dayhike Boots Advice Needed Newer: tends- polyester or polyamid??????
All forums: Older: lady wilsons cleavage Newer: Any advice on crampons?