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What NOT to do in bear country

6:08 p.m. on August 29, 2012 (EDT)
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http://www.thestarphoenix.com/Grandfather+rifle+keeps+camper+sound+mind+body/7153704/story.html 

I hope it's just satire - after all, bringing Grandpa's rifle into Canada will get you arrested, and there are some pretty dumb comments about bears being unable to run downhill (seriously??!!) or not being able to climb trees very well.

And here's what WildSmart Bow Valley, an organization that is an active participant in wildlife management in the Rockies, had to say about it:

"Here my WildSmart friends is a great example of what not to do. As you are all so WildSmart, please feel free to point out all the bear safe things this guy could do next time he goes camping in bear country."

If you're looking for advice from people who are 'hands on' experts in  the field, check their Facebook page.

https://www.facebook.com/wildsmart

4:17 p.m. on August 30, 2012 (EDT)
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Peter,

This is a tongue and cheek article written for the author's amusement.

Please don't mislead people about firearms in Canada.  Long guns (rifles and shotguns) are legal for visitors to bring in with the proper form and a $50 fee.  Canadians are sportsmen and like to hunt.  They do not have much patience for handguns though, especially those brought in by visitors. 

 

6:17 p.m. on August 30, 2012 (EDT)
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This guy wasn't serious, imo. He was hust trying to get a chuckle. what is a winchester 30 gonna do against a grizzly? He'd be dead before he could reach the rifle, let alone fire it. another example of a guy trying to be timothy treadwell?

9:42 a.m. on August 31, 2012 (EDT)
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Like I said, gentlemen, I sincerely hope it was written as satire. But I would be concerned that someone would read it, take it seriously, and decide to do the same.

You're right about the rifle, though, as for crossing a border with it, as long as you fill out the paper work and don't try to smuggle it in. If you pull it out in the Rocky Mountain parks (which occupy a substantial amount of the range) you'll get in a lot of trouble.

I actually saw one tourist walking around on the trails in his full camo outfit with the butt of a handgun sticking out of the hipbelt (on an easy beginner trail, no less!). Parks and the Mounties went out looking for him and his vehicle, as soon as he was reported.

11:58 a.m. on August 31, 2012 (EDT)
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ppine said:

Canadians are sportsmen and like to hunt.

Only a few Canadians are sportsmen and like to hunt. The vast majority don't hunt and hardly anyone owns a firearm of any kind.

(We haven't needed guns since the War of 1812)

1:43 p.m. on August 31, 2012 (EDT)
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A suprprising number of the largest grizzly bears shot in North America in recorded history were killed with- you guessed it .30-30s.  That is because it is a popular cartridge especially among Native Canadians and Alaskans, a group that comes into contact with large bears more than most people.

1:54 p.m. on August 31, 2012 (EDT)
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Perspective is very important.  Many people talk about their dream trip, or a seasonal job for a year or two.  My perspective is a career that involved 30 years of working in the field.  That includes all the crummy times when recreationists would usually not be out there like below zero and windy in the winter, 100 degrees plus and windy in the summer, and skiing thru steep sagebrush in the dark and climbing out with 30 pounds of water samples in the dark.  I am trying to open people's minds by helping them understand that too much of a good thing, can be sometimes be not so good.

It is important to remember to separate your vocation from your avocations whenever possible.

 

1:58 p.m. on August 31, 2012 (EDT)
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ppine said:

too much of a good thing, can be sometimes be not so good.

It is important to remember to separate your vocation from your avocations whenever possible.

 

 Most certainly can agree with that logic 100%. 

3:37 p.m. on August 31, 2012 (EDT)
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Only a few Canadians are sportsmen and like to hunt. The vast majority don't hunt and hardly anyone owns a firearm of any kind.

(We haven't needed guns since the War of 1812)

85% of Canadians live in a city. However, among the rural people of the Maritimes, hunting is still popular. And certainly, you can expect to see long guns in places like Oxford House, Swan River, etc. I doubt that many inhabitants of the land north of Lake Winnipeg go without firearms.

As a Canadian I will say that without firearms most of the country would not have been opened to human habitation; and most of that occurred after 1812.

Perhaps you could say, Canadians didn't need torches after burning the White House.

4:08 p.m. on August 31, 2012 (EDT)
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overmywaders said:

Perhaps you could say, Canadians didn't need torches after burning the White House.

 Oh, yeah, We DID do that, didn't we. :-)

11:41 a.m. on September 1, 2012 (EDT)
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Waders,

Thanks for the support.  I was referring to the western provinces, BC, Alberta and the Yukon where guns and hunting are a way of life away from the cities and north of the border.

April 23, 2014
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