Where does your dog sleep?

3:09 p.m. on February 20, 2013 (EST)
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When I hike I usually let the dog sleep outside, unleashed (don't tell the rangers).  I tried to keep her inside the tent or tied to a tree but she always would bark at things that went bump in the night and ended up tangled in the leash.  When I let her run free she will just go check things out herself quietly.  This usually works fine. My biggest worry is a Jeremiah Johnson-like event where she finds something big, mean and angry and flees back to camp with it hot on her heels.

When we camp in populated areas she has to stay inside the tent but the room inside is getting cramped as the family grows so I am looking for another solution.

Of course dogs are all different but does anyone have any good systems that work for them?

7:17 p.m. on February 20, 2013 (EST)
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My lab is a baby and wants to be in my tent,lap if I let her. My husky refuses to stay inside and whines all night, but he will run all night and drag all day if I let him loose. I make a run, tie a strong line from one tree to another as high as you can, as far apart as feasible. You shouldnt have any trees in between, she will get tangled. Then hang her leash or more cord from the line to her collar, with a little practice, you gotta account for stretch, its reall easy to get the length of the leash part the right length. Its almost impossible to get tangled and gives her more room to move. If she tangles around the trees your tied to, tie something into the line to stop her so she cant reach those trees. Just a makeshift dog run, fixed ones are used in a lot of places to maximize running room and control multiple dogs by running them side by side. My neighbor has eight in a row for his sled dogs, they can almost touch noses, but not get close enough to fight. If my explanation didnt work, im sure you can find a diagram online.

8:39 p.m. on February 20, 2013 (EST)
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I like it, thanks!

9:11 p.m. on February 20, 2013 (EST)
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When my dog/dogs were alive, I had them inside the tent with me, out of the bugs, no issues with porcupines, skunks or bothering others even though most of my bp trips are not in high usage areas.  You're safe letting a dog lose in NF's from LE officers, may not be PC, in Wilderness a dog needs to be under control and some places on a leash at all times.

I live in the woods, so my dogs were used to noises, penned up in a dog pen except for cold temps in the winter.

Duane

6:13 a.m. on February 21, 2013 (EST)
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The rope between trees is quite good, but dogs tend to wrap themselves round one end no matter what you do. And perhaps you are sometimes in an area where trees are seldom. Here in Norway we have a screw like a gigant wine opener to turn into the ground. http://nettdyret.no/jordspyd-med-3-m-plastbelagt-waier.html works fine. Sure there are some producers in US that has some similar.

When I had my siberians I always had to tie them firmly or else they were off for a hunt. My present dog a Border Collie does not run off and may sleep untied anywhere. Mostly in the front end of the tent, or on the floor if we use huts (like now in the winter) The SH´s always slept outside, even in the coldest winter. Otto

9:18 a.m. on February 21, 2013 (EST)
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On the rare occasions my dog comes with us, he always sleeps in the tent. Far too many bugs around in anything but winter for him to be outside being eaten alive and usually far too many critters nosing around camp all night to leave him out there. The "Jeremiah Johnson-like event" is also a real concern, a guy got mauled in his own house just last year when the dog came flying back through the door with mama bear hot on his but.

The only issue we have bringing him in the tent, aside from his size, is a need to monitor his diet for a few days prior. Nothing worse than being stuck in a tent with a 120lb Rottweiler with a bad case of gut rot. He knows who the Alpha in our pack is and generally doesn't freak out about noises unless he spots a bear, then he goes off like an alarm growling and bristling but will stand down the instant I tell him too.

I would be extremely leery, in the areas I camp, of having the dog tied down outside the tent. Predators around here have learned that a dog tied up is like bait on the end of a fishing line. I've heard many stories over the years of Coyotes running in packs and one or two will lay across the dogs chain to hamper it's mobility even further while the rest of the pack has at it.

Wanting to take the dog with us more & having the same space issues, I have been thinking about getting him his own, small tent. I've seen a couple where you can connect two tents with a sort of tunnel, don't know if it's a tent I want to use, seems more like a car campers condo, but I may try a small tent, just like a dog house for him. He can even carry it himself.

11:44 a.m. on February 21, 2013 (EST)
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Her own tent isn't a bad idea. She carries her own food, why not a little tent too? A "pup" tent.  Couldn't resist.

3:26 p.m. on February 21, 2013 (EST)
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Mine has slept in the grave since I was 18, had a Beagle I called Rebel since I was 5 years old, she died when I was in my first semester of college. Have'nt had another yet, hope to if I retire to the land this next year.

11:58 p.m. on February 21, 2013 (EST)
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on my feet ,  damn it got off

11:14 p.m. on February 25, 2013 (EST)
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My Shiloh Sheppard comes on all my backpacking trips with me. At night I use a 20' running line connected to a tree where he can walk around freely but still reach my sleeping bag. He usually sleeps at my feet or half on my legs.

10:16 p.m. on February 26, 2013 (EST)
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I used to let my dog sleep in the vestibule of my tent, sometimes he liked to stay inside the tent. My dog was a long haired northern type and was fine outside the tent or under the vestible.

I had a two man tent with a 17 sq ft vestible for my dog & I. This gave us plenty of space & options. I had room for my wife, kids, dog, extra stuff (not all at once)

I carried the inner tent & poles, the dog carried the rain fly, guylines, & stakes.

 My dog would hang around in camp of his own accord most times, although he was very alert and would key in on sounds I might miss, he just didn't go off chasing things down. He did like to stay inside the tent sometimes (he would whine to get in) but he wanted to go out and walk around a bit every couple of hours. Sometimes if I had to unzip the tent to go out for a minute he would try to get out the tent before me and cause a traffic jam in the tent door. 

I eventually tried using two sections of 550 paracord and three biners to set up a short dog run. It had about 20' for the run with a 6' sliding lead attached to the collar. I could use just the 20' run as a longer tieout, and the 6' lead for a dog leash while hiking.

 One night he got his own foot tangled in the lead and whined until I got up and removed the simple loop from around his hind foot.

Most dogs don't understand rope, training helps.  I tried to accept it as mild entertainment.

I love dogs and I miss mine.

Mike G.

5:41 a.m. on February 27, 2013 (EST)
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I had a pair of black labs (brothers, still young) in my tent once. All was well until one decided to exit in haste some time before sun up. Ripped a hole straight through one side & not on a seam. Both dogs gone in the dark- though briefly was not fun. They ( dogs) are wonderful - I only stayed mad for two months. I would recommend tarps with the dog,snuggling up for warmth. or leaving the tent door open. Leashes on. They don't freak out as much (these boys) if they don't feel trapped. I would not tie up a dog any further than my vestibule!

Otherwise, with animals that won't destroy it: get a bigger tent. Let them carry some of it. Training already grown animals to camp, be outside, is trying.

12:59 a.m. on February 28, 2013 (EST)
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I took my shepherd/rottie mix when she was alive, and now my two goldies. I used the run line/leash with great effectiveness.  

One night on Mt. Adams, my shepherd mix and literally sleeping on my friend's side of the tent, literally on her. My dog scared her, me, and my daughter with a giant WOOF in the night at an elk herd that was grazing in the meadow. Not sure which was more unnerving, the dog's bark, or the thunder of the ground as it shook beneath our heads as the herd ran off!

Now, with my two  goldies together, the beta male kept calm, and the alpha liked having somebody to take care of. Only once did the run line break on a trip, and fortunately, the two dogs stayed put.

I don't like to leave them loose because of the risk of the alpha running off after game, or worse....having a bear chase them back...

I am NOT keen at the idea of having them IN the tent.  I do NOT want my sleeping mat punctured by a fidgety dog!

6:13 a.m. on February 28, 2013 (EST)
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We lucked out with a not very fidgety dog. Ralph sleeps in the tent if there's space, and after day in the outdoors he just crashes. I'm not sure a thundering herd of elk would wake him!

image.jpg

9:22 p.m. on March 1, 2013 (EST)
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My last 2 dogs were Great Danes, and they slept where ever they wanted.

:-) 

At that time i was going solo as i was married to a different gal, than now. Much of that camping was done in a hammock and so my pack would be at my head tree. The dog could be under the hammock.

A working dog that size carried large bicycle panniers, and looks silly in a dog pack. They can carry 30 pounds of their own foods, and some of the hikers gear to boot.

9:31 p.m. on March 1, 2013 (EST)
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hotdogman said:

My lab is a baby and wants to be in my tent,lap if I let her. My husky refuses to stay inside and whines all night, but he will run all night and drag all day if I let him loose. I make a run, tie a strong line from one tree to another as high as you can, as far apart as feasible. You shouldnt have any trees in between, she will get tangled. Then hang her leash or more cord from the line to her collar, with a little practice, you gotta account for stretch, its reall easy to get the length of the leash part the right length. Its almost impossible to get tangled and gives her more room to move. If she tangles around the trees your tied to, tie something into the line to stop her so she cant reach those trees. Just a makeshift dog run, fixed ones are used in a lot of places to maximize running room and control multiple dogs by running them side by side. My neighbor has eight in a row for his sled dogs, they can almost touch noses, but not get close enough to fight. If my explanation didnt work, im sure you can find a diagram online.

 That's reads clear enough to me.. I know what you are saying though.

In case it ever helps i did a sort of like thing for horses camping away from a farm setting.

I found a camp site that had a sturdy looking tree with sturdy looking limbs, and tied a line from a high enough limb it was over the horses head and had the lead long enough the horse could put it's head closer to the ground before the tree limb acted like a spring pole.

I saw other men build silly rope circles as a corral which a horse simply stepped / necked thru partly to be all tangled up and a tangled up horse is a paniced horse.

Oh reading back, you forgot to mention any form of stops, and i am sure you use them, so the dog can't reach either tree.

That could be a simple birds knot / figure 8 knot on the run line, near each tree or a 'U bolt clamp' if the run line is dedicated.

8:45 a.m. on March 2, 2013 (EST)
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Our dog ends up in the tent with us but we make sure to clean off his paws as best we can before he settles down for the night. I like the idea mentioned earlier about stringing a temporary dog run. I may give that a shot next time we are out.

2:23 p.m. on March 2, 2013 (EST)
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I just spent a week sleeping in a 2 man tent with my 15 1/2 year old Border Collie.  Bonnie is one of my best friends and a great comfort on a long trip away from home for a couple of weeks.

12:37 p.m. on March 3, 2013 (EST)
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I've noticed dogs seem to be quite popular in this forum.  But IMO the best place for a dog when its "owner" is in the backcountry is back at home, or if that's not possible, being taken care of in a nice kennel.  I don't feel dogs have any place in the backcountry bothering animals and other hikers.  This is one (of many) reasons I enjoy hiking in designated wilderness areas where dogs are disallowed.

I happened to see this sign the other day and it reminded me of this thread :).


dog-1024.jpg

12:47 p.m. on March 3, 2013 (EST)
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Dogs belong with their owners.  I have taken dogs on airplanes, canoes, rafts, powerboats, pack trips and used them to work cattle.  I have never had any of my herding dogs harass wildlife, another dog or another person.  The little wolves are like Little Buddhas and teach me to accept what is.  They never complain and expect little.  Few of my human outdoor companions live up to such a standard except for my brother.

4:47 p.m. on March 3, 2013 (EST)
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Very few dogs I've run into live up to the standard! As long as it is the occasional encounter, I don't mind. I too feel they should stay home..

4:58 p.m. on March 3, 2013 (EST)
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No one will be bothered by my dogs, unless they have heard 'Unto the Father, unto the Son, and into the hole he goes.

But while my dogs did go, they didn't ever bother anybody.

Great Danes never bother anybody, they terrorize everybody. At least that's what other people told me.

I can't say i have heard of any wilderness rules that prevent dogs from coming either. That must be a western thing.

 My winter care taker friends sometimes had a dog with them all winter. Goldie was a dog, and she stayed with my buddy Pete, and he was a full time care taker.

Out camped in places the only problem i had with other dogs was the other people who didn't care for their digs and keep them close.

Reassuring me that Rex the GSD won't bite, wasn't my concern when i know my GDD Champ might eat Rex, if Champ had his way.

Last I knew the USA was still a Free Country and dogs can't read.

I must admit that will all these Deer Crossing signs on the local roads that  it must seem as if the Deer can and do read, but i am certain dogs don't.

8:10 p.m. on March 3, 2013 (EST)
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Actually mis-stated that. I meant National Parks (prohibiting dogs) not wilderness areas ...

10:00 p.m. on March 3, 2013 (EST)
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Not all....... Back east we don't have many national parks so much as National Forest but in Maine there is Arcadia National Park, and dogs can go there last i knew.

I think I saw dogs in Yellowstone.. on leashes.

I took YS as a forest but i was wrong on that..

I like both cats and dogs but there are some people with some dogs i just can't stand. I have the idea you see things that way more than you just don't like dogs in the woods.

When i see dogs in the woods they usually fear me, and all I wanna do is beat them up which i tell the owners face to face, but my beatings come with puppy love too :-)

99% of the owners think i fear their dogs, but i don't. 100% of the owners figure they just escaped one strange dude once they get to leave.

10:18 a.m. on March 4, 2013 (EST)
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bheiser1 said:

I've noticed dogs seem to be quite popular in this forum.  But IMO the best place for a dog when its "owner" is in the backcountry is back at home, or if that's not possible, being taken care of in a nice kennel.  I don't feel dogs have any place in the backcountry bothering animals and other hikers.

 You may be entitled to your opinion, as am I, but I seriously hope you didn't mean this the way it sounds.

Fist off, the gigantic over generalization that everyone's dog spends it every waking moment "bothering" other hikers and animals is asinine.

Secondly, I'm entitled to bring my dog anywhere it is legal. He is well behaved and completely under control at all times. Maybe people with insecurities about dogs should stay out of the woods where they might encounter things that frighten them.

Statements like these are the reason I generally prefer spending time with dogs & cats over most people I've ever met.

1:35 p.m. on March 4, 2013 (EST)
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The best behaved dogs are the ones that "go everywhere with their owners."  They are not left home alone during the work day or put in kennels when their owners go in the outdoors.  Homeless people make great dog owners.

In my neighborhood, I was out walking this morning and their is a beautiful male Lab of great breeding running loose on a dirt excavation site.  There is heavy equipment going in several directions but he knows how to stay out of the way. 

I had an old cow dog Snuffy that I used to take logging with me.  When the saw was running she kept her distance.  When I turned the saw off she came and sat next to me.  Dogs are more than pets.  They are some of the great companions on Earth.  Equines I rate second.

6:44 p.m. on March 4, 2013 (EST)
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ppine, my better dane would slip into a bar and lay under the table and no one ever said a word..... Now I have no idea if they saw a brindle dane being quiet, or plain just didn't see him.

One evening however the cops saw me put him in my van of the time. There was a ice storm raging outside, I was done with my 1 beer after work and let the dog run the 1/4er mile to the road.

I didn't see the cops either, so when I drove about 2 miles to be just in front of the PD store doing about 20/25 mph all the way i was a bit surprised.

The Cop queried me as to 'Do you know why I pulled you over?'

No Sir i replied but i KNOW I wasn't speeding.... he says 'What did you pick up' I wanted to say 'A disease?'  But i replied: I didn't pick up anything, because i didn't do anything unusual as i saw things.

Next he says, 'What about a dog?' me: Yup I picked up MY Dog. 

Him: 'Got papers? 

Me: 'Nope they are in Davey Fla.'

Now i am getting pissed and that ain't good...

Cop: 'Get the dog out please.'

Me:' What for?'

Him: 'I want to see the dog.'

Me: 'Why?'

Him: 'I want to see you handle the dog.'

Me: 'Ok'

I get the dane out and the cop wants the dog dead center on the painted line.

I comment: I am the one who had 1 beer,  the dog seldom drinks unless we'er hikin'!'

With no further chat I clicked my fingers, the dog sat. I headed off down the road to the next pole and gave a whistle with out turning around.

I hear a dull thud and the cop starts yelling, but i can't tell what he is saying. I turn, and see he is down and the dog has some how caught him up and is dragging him right down the middle of road! LOL

I yell CHAMP DOWN and click my fingers 3 times,  the dog stops and lays down dead center of the road. At this point I have lost my temper and am running back to the cop who gets up and i see him unwrapping his arm, which he had reached thru a horse halter on the dog that was his harness albeit upside down,  and the cop says to me get out of my town now, and don't ever come back!

I am steamed past polite at him risking himself and my dog in the middle of a glazed ice road and scream FU in his face! I yell at the dog,  get in the van CHAMP, I look at that cop and tell him my parents live on the town line but in the next town FU again. And tell him the next time he will see me is tomorrow, and the next time he wants to look at my dog he better have a big juicy steak or the dog will eat him.

That this is my dog,  he is a attack trained great dane, and i am serious, and his stupid .38 isn't enough gun to stop that dog from in fact eating him if I just say so.

I'ld have to say he wasn't accustomed to being talked to like that, but at the time i was just a cheap biker tramp with a really big dog.

40 years ago I was bullet proof and 10 feet tall. LOL

6:50 p.m. on March 4, 2013 (EST)
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Just in case me tail becomes in doubt. My son cleaned this up, but i also have the original.
DadRestored2.jpg

1:09 p.m. on March 5, 2013 (EST)
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I never use a tent and my dog (an airdale) sleeps somewhere nearby. She usually shoves her nose into my ear at some point during the night just to be sure I don't sleep too well. After ensuring I'm awake, she goes back to her nest and curls up.

Where I spend much of my time, I am much moe likely to see a grizzly bear than another hiker. The dog hears better than I and has a nose on her to boot. I've had various companion dogs over the years and she's not a bad one. 

Regarding cops and dogs: I once had a little sheltie dog which rode on a platform on the tank. I got stopped once by a cop who wasn;'t sure I should have a dog on the bike. "Does that dog always ride there like that?" he asked.

"Yep"

"You ever been stopped before?"

"Yep"

"What did the officer say then?"

"He said, "Does that dog always ride there like that?". I thought it was funny. He thought it was less so.

Another time, with the same dog on the bike, I was travellng at night in a fairly heavy rain. The dog was crouched behind the small windshield, staying out of the rain, and I passed a truck only to find a cop car in front of the truck. I passed him too and predictably, the lights came on. I kept going to an underpass I knew was up ahead then pulled over. The cop came up asking why I had passed him. I replied that if I stayed behind and went too slow the dog would get wet. He hadn't noticed the dog up to this point and said that seemed reasonable enough but I should slow down anyway. One of the few times I didn't get a ticket!

This dog was a good camping companion as well. Alert and not too brave. She could alert me to potential trouble but not go looking for it. A bulldog I had later was too pugnacious for his own good and I was always afraid he was going to bring trouble to me.  GD 

10:10 a.m. on March 6, 2013 (EST)
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greydog, I totally understand going faster is going drier. In NH if it is a warm ride day and it begins to rain I take off clothing and pack in hard bags, as everyone else is rain suiting up. If the ride is on the interstate (dull and boring) I ride over the limit is it keeps me dry.

My bike is a Kawi Nomad with a big fat screen lowers and has 'desertdawgs' crash bar covers on the engine guards, so I can create a pretty big air bubble with any speed. Never had a dog that rode on a bike with me yet though. (Being polite now is probably the better part of valor) LOL

But I have seen up to Goldens size ride.

12:56 p.m. on March 7, 2013 (EST)
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Greydog,

Airedales are the kings of the terriers and very under-rated.  They traditionally are used to lead mountain lion dogs.  The hounds have the noses for trailing and the Airedales are fearless leaders.  Only a few other breeds come to mind like Rhodesian Ridgebacks, Mastiffs, Akitas, maybe German sheperds, and Rottweilers that have the same mental toughness.

I was in Seattle visiting family going down the freeway in a rainstorm.  A convertible Saab passed me with the top down and the windows up.  Go fast enough and you don't get wet. 

 

11:24 a.m. on March 8, 2013 (EST)
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ppine, My maternal grandparents had a Airedale when i was a wee lad. it was older and I was very young, not the best match. All that dog did was beg food and sleep.

And I'll have you know I am deeply insulted for you lack of including great Dane in the list of smart dogs !

LOL  ;-)

12:48 p.m. on March 8, 2013 (EST)
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Lodgepole,

My list was for dogs with the most mental toughness.  My brother used to have Danes always 2 at a time.  They ran down the local deer.  They scared every dog in the neighborhood.  And they would fight with each other and hurt anyone that tried to break them up.  I have tenant with 2 Danes.  One of them is not allowed near strangers.  Danes are great dogs but short lived and not for amateur dog handlers.

9:35 p.m. on March 8, 2013 (EST)
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ppine, I hope you noticed my ;-)

Not so funny a story but then it was to me.. One of my danes made 11 year and some months the other one was stolen...

8:11 a.m. on March 9, 2013 (EST)
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ppine said:

Greydog,

Airedales are the kings of the terriers and very under-rated.  They traditionally are used to lead mountain lion dogs.  The hounds have the noses for trailing and the Airedales are fearless leaders.  Only a few other breeds come to mind like Rhodesian Ridgebacks, Mastiffs, Akitas, maybe German sheperds, and Rottweilers that have the same mental toughness.

I was in Seattle visiting family going down the freeway in a rainstorm.  A convertible Saab passed me with the top down and the windows up.  Go fast enough and you don't get wet. 

 

 + 1 for the Akita - given the right climate and an experienced and responsible owner dedicated to training the dog.

I backpacked with one until he died at age 13, a very tough and alert breed.

7:56 p.m. on March 9, 2013 (EST)
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buddy is a Chesapeake bay retriever. he doesn't come with us but if he did I am sure he would sleep inside. he is a wussy dog.

12:21 p.m. on March 10, 2013 (EDT)
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Trailjester,

I grew up in Maryland as a kid.  The C Bay retreiver is very popular.  If you have one that is wussy you made him that way.  They tend to be intense one person dogs with lots of go power.  My neighborhood had one until recently when he passed.  I was one of the few people that could just walk up to him.

9:17 p.m. on March 10, 2013 (EDT)
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yeah he is afraid of thunder, fireworks and gunshots. he is a wussy boy, but it's not my fault. blame my husband. he spoils him rotten.

9:09 a.m. on March 11, 2013 (EDT)
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Saw this today and thought of this thread. I miss my Husky.
Dog-sled-Marathon.jpg

12:12 p.m. on March 12, 2013 (EDT)
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Awesome husky pic!  I miss mine too! (RIP Athena)

So many cool dogs to own, so little time.

9:56 p.m. on March 12, 2013 (EDT)
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I would love to take my dog with me, but despite their bad rep. These guys are lazy, farting, and sleep like a newborn. Gotta wait till I get my German Shep to hit the trails with.

2:55 p.m. on April 11, 2013 (EDT)
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Hiking with a dog is one of the benefits of having a dog and a true joy in life. We have a pair of Labs. Chocolate Male, Black female from the same litter. First of all having a pair of dogs helps to keep them calm and socialized when other animals are around, they don't need to run over to investigate if they are well socialized.


pupsarch.jpg


We backpack and car camp with both dogs and they usually sleep in the tent or the vestibule depending on tent and if the wifey is along or not. The key here is training, they have been sleeping in tents on trips for nearly 10 years so the newness is gone but they still keep alert at times. Yes an occasional bark at night may send something scurrying off but that is a benefit IMO. I have tried to have then sleep outside on their own but the chance of them wondering off vs having them on a leash is too much. I can simply open the door when they have to go out and with a simple whistle they come back. I am alpha and they know that their job is to keep an eye on me and the wife. These dogs know key phrases that also make them more appealing to other hikers. First of all they are not real interested in sniffing people unless someone calls them over, even then they do not spend much time with the ppl. But phrases like "Off Trail, ...sit" when ppl are walking by, "Find The Trail" works well to let them know to head down trail or to find the trail in the snow or over sandstone. "Side of road"is something we use in suburbia and on the trail the dogs know to move over to let bikes or others pass. One of my favorites is "Find Mom" they will bolt back down the trail in order to check in on my wife and judging by the amount of time they are gone I usually know how far back she is without having to call her on the handheld radio/gps. .


pupsjancoronaarch.jpg


Solo hiking with my male lab (Packer) is even better. His sister is not with us and neither is my wife so he is focused on what we are doing and where I am. Not being neutered he still likes to head down the trail several hundred yards but I never go longer than 10 minutes without seeing him, he always comes back, especially if I blow the training whistle. Having him under my shelter or in a small tent is really no problem since dogs will try to make themselves small and fit wherever they can. The other benefit is that dogs are a little space heater, getting cold? Slide the dogs up next to your core (The Wife likes this part). Packer and His Sister Josie each have a Ruff Wear Palisades Pack which also has water bladders with a spout. The female hardly carries hers anymore, they are getting older, but the non neutered male is still an awesome physical specimen so he has no problem carrying several days worth of food and even a 1lb sleeping bag he uses as a sleeping mat.

Overall unless I am hiking in a National Park like The Maze or Canyonlands I usually have a dog or two with me. A good dog is a well trained dog and having a trained dog on the trail should not bother anyone. Of course they may harass the occasional butterfly shadow or grasshopper but not people.  Large game like Deer and Elk never stick around near hikers anyway and we have only come across Bears a couple times. Yes the Bear ran after the dogs starting freaking out, another benefit.


DSCN7216.jpg


And I will probably have other dogs in the future and yes they too will be on the trail with me. I do pack in many areas where they are not allowed as well which is too bad since my dogs do less damage than most of the hikers I come across.

1:47 p.m. on April 12, 2013 (EDT)
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Dogs are the first line of defense.  They have great equipment for hearing, smelling and seeing.  My dogs have chased bears out of camp many times. 

2:28 p.m. on April 12, 2013 (EDT)
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When i took my dane if he was gone in the morning, I just ate packed up and left too. He always found me later. The only difference was I had to carry his pack and what was in it. I would call every so often, and he would return inside of 3 hours usually.

There were less people on the trail back then, and even less if it were cold.

Today i would stake him out or build a 550 cord run.

3:27 p.m. on April 12, 2013 (EDT)
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I can see it already. The Dane goes out to check out the scene only to return and you are GONE! The looik on hi face at that moment must have been pretty funny. Then nose to trail to confirm direction and then down the trail. Whew, that is a lot of trust but I am not surprised at all. Ever since our pups came into our lives we have played games of hide and seek when they stray off. Sometimes I will radio wifey and tell her to hide, then tell the dogs to "Go find Mom" I have also been the hider. But to see them come down the trail and pass where you went off trail only to have them come back and discover where you are is an indescribable assurance that you are not likely to lose them.


However, One time I was on a day hike up Gold Hill on the Colorado Trail and then on into Frisco via Peaks Trail to my Brother in laws house. Not that big of a deal 7 miles and I usually arrive just in time for the party or dinner or whatever the plan is. Well one time our female lab was off sniffing Elk poo and probably considering rollling in it, she likes to make her own perfume, :Rolleyes: anyway I did not notice that she had not reported in for awhile. Her brother is usually the one I see less often, although he is always around somewhere. Again training whistle. Well I called for her and nothing, I blew the whistle and nothing, oh my, that moment of apprehension, did she go back home? Is she still ahead of me knowing where we were going? If she had gone home that wold be fine but we wouldn't know till we got home and the anxiety with wifey would not be good.

So I blew the whistle hard hoping she would hear it and had not yet gone back over the ridge. I started hiking and a few minutes later she comes running down the trail behind me. I am not sure she heard the whistle but she must have realized my scent was more fresh in one direction than in the other. This was the second time she did something like that but the first time she actually DID go home. It was a couple miles from home and my wife calls me to ask, "Do you know where Josie is?" I said yeah I saw her about 10 minutes ago. Nope it had been longer and she decided to go home. I am not sure she lost us or just went home?

Our male, Packer, is the one we have to keep an eye on but only when we are at home. If we let him out he could get a whiff of a female and be gone for 8 hours. I let him keep all his equipment when he was a pup and he is all boy. But when we are on the trail he reports back frequently, he always makes sure we are still "on a hike" and is enamored with his "Mom" my wife so if she is around he isn't going far.

5:19 p.m. on April 12, 2013 (EDT)
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Well I did drop bits of his food and maybe a bit of mine. That sort of pointed which way I went. But for all I know the crows got that.

Keeping that dane tied up was impossible. Just couldn't be done, and I can't pack a fence 8 feet high.

What I used for a collar was a horse halter upside down, which gave a top strap and a side strap on both sides. That had typical brass rings still used today i imagine a circle of brass with 2 rectangle slots each circle, and for 3 brass rings. I could slip in a choke chain all to no avail :rolleyes:

Put that rig on a run and the dane would just stand in the center limp cable to his harness drop his head, extend his fore feet and shake. I nicked named him Houdini.

He would show up at work, I would tie him up and later he would be gone. he would just go home, and i would find him in his dog house. This happened in different states too, same thing different distances.

Big goofy dog just lumpin' around scarin' the pants off people.

In 77' I took a bit of steel in an eye, and had to do surgery. The end result was I had one working eye and one eye that resembled a hamburger for about 9 months not that i saw it until about then.

I was doing a stint as general manager for a foreign car shop. One day i needed new dealer tags and had to go to Boston to the DMV, and took a M Benze and the dane. :D

That day was fun. I was doing the black patch thing, and went to the wrong DMV, where the entire line of people just moved over for the 'blind man with the seeing eye dog' it didn't take hours to just find out i was at the wrong place, which was written on the form I had. So I went to the correct place right off, saving tons of time. Got there and the same thing happened. Whole line moved over for the blind man and his seeing eye dog. The Lady in the cage told me i needed to be on the 3rd fllor could the seeing eye dog do elevators?

I stated he could but didn't yet know his numbers and so someone would need to press 3 since i was blind... :rolleyes:

That lady in the cage called some dmv guy to escort me and he feared the dog would bite him, but he did it. When the door opened on the 3rd floor the ladies up there went nuts wanting to pet the dog but there was a full length counter and no opening chest high.

 They said it would be fine if the dig just placed his ft paws up on the counter which he could do, and so that's what he did... Those ladies had their day alrighty, and i got my tags with time left over.

I knew a gal working in the statehouse and wondered if i could catch her for lunch and went there to see. I did catch her a tad too early and she told me to wait in the Rotunda. That was my first time to be there and there were Springfield rifles all around that place, and I began to investigate. That was when the smartest man in the world decided to meet me. He was wearing a green  suit and pushing a 4 foot wide mop, and he slit his eyes and  sneered at me, stating your'e not blind! That dog better not mess up my floor! I just grinned....

The sword fish tw'ernt bad and the scenery was great!

11:28 a.m. on April 13, 2013 (EDT)
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I want to go on a trip with Ralph, the GS pictured above.

12:19 a.m. on April 17, 2013 (EDT)
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In the tent with me.  Usually its too buggy here in the late spring/summer/fall to leave him outside.  

10:16 a.m. on April 17, 2013 (EDT)
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ppine said:

I want to go on a trip with Ralph, the GS pictured above.

 Ralphie would be happy to go with you if you'd be prepared to share a morsel now and then...
Hungry-hund.jpg

3:08 p.m. on April 17, 2013 (EDT)
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buddy can't go with us. we just found out he has displaysia. that really pisses me off. BUMMER!!

11:09 p.m. on April 17, 2013 (EDT)
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Trailjester said:

buddy can't go with us. we just found out he has displaysia. that really pisses me off. BUMMER!!

 Bring him to a doggie chiropractor. Or better yet, bring him to a peoplepractor that works on dogs too. It works wonders on mine. As long as you get one that knows what he/she is doing.

10:52 a.m. on April 18, 2013 (EDT)
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Trailjester, I'm really sorry to hear about Buddy's hip displaysia.  That's a tough one for dogs.  I hope he is still able to stay relatively active, dogs are awesome. 

11:03 a.m. on April 18, 2013 (EDT)
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JerseyWreckDiver said:

Trailjester said:

buddy can't go with us. we just found out he has displaysia. that really pisses me off. BUMMER!!

 Bring him to a doggie chiropractor. Or better yet, bring him to a peoplepractor that works on dogs too. It works wonders on mine. As long as you get one that knows what he/she is doing.

 Good idea..... I took my dane to a vet who brought in a DC. The vet administered a drug called rompin (sp) IMO that drug should be called not rompin, as my dane went down with his eyes about falling out of his face LOL....

Made him a wet noddle, and that made life better for the DC to adjust his neck.

For a dog that has displaysia, you just teach him to stay close by and to not just run anytime he wants. No playing ball or stick. Make it a work dog.

But don't load up a pack on it either. I was lucky that my danes didn't suffer from that, but i know what it is.

12:52 p.m. on April 19, 2013 (EDT)
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his hip has already gone out and they popped it back in but then it popped out the next day...he still can run and walk but I don't take him with me on walks anymore. he has a hard time going up stairs, but he's getting better at it. he just needs to get used to having a bum hip.

1:23 p.m. on April 19, 2013 (EDT)
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Trailjester said:

his hip has already gone out and they popped it back in but then it popped out the next day...he still can run and walk but I don't take him with me on walks anymore. he has a hard time going up stairs, but he's getting better at it. he just needs to get used to having a bum hip.

 Not good..... Would you consider a neoprene wrap, or a ace bandage.

If the dog is young enough and you wrap that joint for long enough things might change. I really can't say, but I always have hope.

I have a lot of bad joints too. Any of my suggestions are blind as you know, and would take creative cutting, trial and error fitting, and you could trash items and waste cash. I do this all the time for everything when there is no other better 'Known' method.

1:30 p.m. on April 20, 2013 (EDT)
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he seems to be doing ok on it. he only has a little limp. I think his leg is making a "false socket", that's what the vet called it.

August 22, 2014
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