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Toilet Tissue

5:38 a.m. on March 15, 2001 (EST)
(Guest)

Hi folks, it's good to be back. I was reading on another forum that animals will dig up toilet paper, and that some pack it out with them. One guy said he saw dug-up tissue many times on one trail and it was really gross. Why not just burn it in the campfire? I am planning my first backpacking trip and was really wondering about this.

8:25 a.m. on March 15, 2001 (EST)
(Guest)

a.k.a. James, Wallack, Wallhack (used to be James, but too many now)
Often Pack It

If you have a campfire, burning is great. You can also burn it without the camp fire, but sometimes it doesn't burn so well. I often just pack it out, especially if I'm in a place that is more rocky than dirt.

One suggestion, if you're flying to the place you're hiking. Grab a few of the airline barf bags. They're good to put your ziplocks inside -- not clear, so you don't have to look at it, and they're wax lined, so they give a little added proteciton. They actually make good hiking garbage bags generally.

12:23 p.m. on March 15, 2001 (EST)
(Guest)

Leave No Trace

A few years ago, some woman in the San Gabriels (northeast of LA) burned some toilet paper and lit the forest on fire. It burned several tens of thousands of acres before it was put out, with serious smoke and visibility problems in the desert communities north of the mountains like Palmdale and Mojave and very restricted visibilities across Cajon Pass (major north-south interstate highway). It lasted for over a week, IIRC.

Most of the western wilderness areas and National Parks _require_ that you pack out your toilet paper, and some require you to pack out your solid human waste (Shasta, Rainier, just to name two). It's not only animals that bring "Charmin lilies" to the surface. Practice a little with some toilet paper, brown shoe polish, and doubled ziplock baggies. It really isn't hard to stay clean. And you should be washing your hands or using hand sanitizer anyway, so health should not be a problem. On that line, it turns out that a lot of intestinal problems blamed on giardia are really neglect of hand cleaning before eating and food preparation in the backcountry.

So which would you rather have, lots of Charmin lilies all over along with stinking human solid waste that has been unearthed, or using a multilayer carryout system? Or fill the "wilderness" with outhouses that harbor blackwidow spiders hiding beneath the hole?

Lots of good information on the Leave No Trace website, www.lnt.org.

1:53 p.m. on March 15, 2001 (EST)
(Guest)

a.k.a. JohnW
Bag tip

My local newspaper is delivered in an orange plastic bag. I save these and take them along for bagging waste. Nice and long, easy to tie off, and with the bright orange color it is hard to mistake for anything else.

Welcome to the LNT world!

Quote:

One suggestion, if you're flying to the place you're hiking. Grab a few of the airline barf bags. They're good to put your ziplocks inside -- not clear, so you don't have to look at it, and they're wax lined, so they give a little added proteciton. They actually make good hiking garbage bags generally.

7:13 p.m. on March 15, 2001 (EST)
(Guest)

Alternative

Try baby-wipes in place of the paper. They seem to work much better/quicker than paper, pack into a zip-lock easier and have the additional use of cleaning hands etc

7:56 a.m. on March 16, 2001 (EST)
(Guest)

a.k.a. Brad, iceclimber

In more and more parks camp fires are prohibited,such as the high peaks of the Adirondacks. The best method is to follow the Low Impact Leave no Trace rules and PACK WHAT YOU BRING IN OUT! That means everything.

7:28 p.m. on March 16, 2001 (EST)
(Guest)

Re: Bag tip

If you don't want the mess but still respect our wilderness, my recommendation is to bring a few dog poop bags, and a heavy duty plastic bag. My favorite? Those bright yellow heavy duty bags with big labels that say, "Hazardous Waste"!

Use the poop bag as a mitt to pick up waste and turn it around on itself to contain the mess. Seal, and put it in the bigger plastic bag.

No mess and environmentally friendly.

-Ray

Quote:

My local newspaper is delivered in an orange plastic bag. I save these and take them along for bagging waste. Nice and long, easy to tie off, and with the bright orange color it is hard to mistake for anything else.

Welcome to the LNT world!

Quote:

One suggestion, if you're flying to the place you're hiking. Grab a few of the airline barf bags. They're good to put your ziplocks inside -- not clear, so you don't have to look at it, and they're wax lined, so they give a little added proteciton. They actually make good hiking garbage bags generally.

5:21 a.m. on March 17, 2001 (EST)
(Guest)

Thanks guys for all the input. I think I will go with the baby wipes too. They do freshen you up, I have used them in primitive campsites to take a "polka dot" bath. I do appreciate you comments.

Keep those boots dusty.

9:21 a.m. on March 21, 2001 (EST)
(Guest)

Re: Stones?

According to the backcountry guide 'dunadan' the idea with the stones is that at the end of each meal, you swallow a 3" - 4" diameter stone. Last one in - last one out. The stone is the last thing passed thus cleaning up the mess. He favors jagged ones.

12:15 p.m. on March 22, 2001 (EST)
(Guest)

a.k.a. Steve
Ouch!

----According to the backcountry guide 'dunadan' the idea with the stones is that at the end of each meal, you swallow a 3" - 4" diameter stone. Last one in - last one out. The stone is the last thing passed thus cleaning up the mess. He favors jagged ones.----


Do you realize how big a 3"-4" diameter stone is? 4" is the largest distance across the palm of my hand. A baseball is about 3.5". I'd like to see someone swallow that! And swallowing it would be the easy part...

3:58 p.m. on March 22, 2001 (EST)
(Guest)

Re: Stones?

Thanks Violin, I got a real kick out of that one!

3:52 p.m. on March 28, 2001 (EST)
37 reviewer rep
747 forum posts

Quote:

Thanks guys for all the input. I think I will go with the baby wipes too. They do freshen you up, I have used them in primitive campsites to take a "polka dot" bath. I do appreciate you comments.

Your post started with "I am planning my first backpack trip". Yet above you assert your familiarity with primitive campsites. You must be one of the crusty old camping babes writing under a fresh new name... just to see if we are more polite to you if we think yer a newby.
Jim

6:01 a.m. on March 29, 2001 (EST)
(Guest)

Re: Yes, First Backpacking Trip

Yes, Jim I have been in a primitive campsite - no water, no electricity, no facilities. We had to carry everything from the parking area to the site. We carried all kinds of conveniences because my camping buddies insisted on them - porta potti, Coleman stove, ice chest and such.

No, I have never backpacked. That is why I am asking these "dumb" questions.

No, I have not changed my name and I don't intend to either. It seems that you and THE SCHLIMMER are the only ones who are not so polite. I am certainly not crusty nor am I a "babe". Just old. What's with that?

9:12 p.m. on March 29, 2001 (EST)
(Guest)

No such thing...

Quote:

That is why I am asking these "dumb" questions.

No such thing as "dumb" questions (well, maybe one or two, but not yours), but we've defintiely proven that there is such a thing as Dumb Responses.

April 24, 2014
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