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Hiker attacked by polar bear

10:02 a.m. on July 28, 2013 (EDT)
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10:57 a.m. on July 28, 2013 (EDT)
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Can't (& won't) blame the bear. Gotta eat...

12:27 p.m. on July 28, 2013 (EDT)
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I posted this to help illustrate some of the unique problems we face in Canada's more northerly National Parks and what Parks Canada is doing to make it safer for both staff and visitors. I have been to a few of the Parks along the coast and into the Arctic islands; they aren't at all like Banff or Yellowstone.

12:53 p.m. on July 28, 2013 (EDT)
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When someone recommends hiring an armed guard...you may want to take it seriously. Could get mauled by a polar bear....or you could be kidnapped by the Taliban. Armed guards arn't there just for the heck of it. If they were then they would just be called guides. You don't neccesarily need a guide, but if they recommend an armed guard...there is probably a reason. Just sayin.

1:02 p.m. on July 28, 2013 (EDT)
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White bears get the attention of even the most seasoned bush people in the North.  Largest land mammal in North America that views all other mammals as prey.

An armed guard is a great idea.  I think I will bring one on my next backcountry trip.

5:21 p.m. on July 28, 2013 (EDT)
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North1

if you see any more info pertaining to the electric fence would you please post.

Peter Deering, with Parks Canada, said the bear managed to pass a portable electrical fence and drag Dyer from his tent at around 1:30 a.m. AT.

i also ran across this

Authorities are investigating and trying to determine what kind of fence was used and whether it was working properly at the time of the attack.

http://www.sunjournal.com/news/lewiston-auburn/2013/07/26/pine-tree-legal-attorney-recovering-polar-bear-att/1398872

i've seen video of electric fences stopping grizzly bears from taking food. but i have also seen animals learn to charge through electric fences knowing that they will get shocked.

6:30 p.m. on July 28, 2013 (EDT)
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You mean like my Siberian husky? lol she will climb an electrified cattle fence like it doesn't even phase her. Forget about those invisible dog fences. If that bear is anywhere near as stubborn as my husky the fence wouldn't have come close to stoping her. Will be interested to see what details come to light though.

11:54 a.m. on July 29, 2013 (EDT)
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When you go into the back country always remember one thing; you are made of food. 

7:21 p.m. on July 29, 2013 (EDT)
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There are still plenty of beautiful and wild places in North America for me to visit where I don't need to hire an armed local guard. 

I'll work my way through that list first, then worry about the others.

7:43 p.m. on July 29, 2013 (EDT)
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I think more people will take the warning about having an armed guard more serious after this..

8:35 a.m. on July 30, 2013 (EDT)
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Well, the victim is a legal aid...so you know SOMEBODY'S going to get sued.

This portable electric fence goes back to my comment on emergency beacons...technology creates a false sense of backcountry security. People start equating a trip to the wilderness as a trip to the mall.

10:52 a.m. on August 1, 2013 (EDT)
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Lazya4 said:

if you see any more info pertaining to the electric fence would you please post.

 

Sorry Dan I was away for awhile. Electric fences are a form of passive defence against bears and other large predators. Their efficiency is dependent upon how well they are set up, i.e. how far apart the wires are placed. Many people who hunt, fish and hike within more remote areas from Alaska to Labrador use them to safe guard semi permanent camps. I have also seen them used by canoeist along the Kobuk River and in the central barrenlands of Canada, especially along the Thelon.

I have canoed past some camps in the Arctic, abandoned for years, but with the solar powered bear fence still ticking away.

As for the "armed guards" mentioned in the article, that seems to be a bit of litterary hype. They are really bear monitors, usually hired from a local community. Many people up here have questioned the use of bear monitors and see it more as an economic incentive rather than a safety one. Bear monitors have sometimes been more trouble than they are worth.

 

 

5:44 p.m. on August 1, 2013 (EDT)
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North,

"Bear monitors" tend to be the local rummies you find on any street corner in cities of the North.  They are used to watch for bears when school children are at recess in places like the Kenai Peninsula and outside Cody, WY.

10:40 p.m. on August 1, 2013 (EDT)
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I'm not so sure I want an alcoholic covering my fanny in bear country...

9:50 a.m. on August 2, 2013 (EDT)
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I'm becoming quite interested in polar bears, now that they're moving farther south. Rumours of crossbreeding with brown bears started a few years ago and the behaviour of polar bears is so different that they could be more of a problem. As has been pointed out, they view EVERYTHING as food, and they don't seem to take 'no' for an answer. 

A most informative conversation going on here. Thanks for posting, North.

9:59 a.m. on August 2, 2013 (EDT)
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oruacat2 said:

There are still plenty of beautiful and wild places in North America for me to visit where I don't need to hire an armed local guard. 

I'll work my way through that list first, then worry about the others.

Just based on the stats, you're safer in Canada's northern parks than you would be hiking on the busier trails in the US. The people you meet are a lot more dangerous than any animals.

12:20 p.m. on August 2, 2013 (EDT)
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north

thanks for your reply. the image of an abonded fence charger in the artic ticking away will stay with me for some time.

i live in vineyard country. there are laws here banning the hunting of bears with dogs, hence an increase in the bear population. seems like they have learned to savour european grapes. the only effective way to fence them out is with electric fences.

i was most curious about the fence failure in this unfortuneate incident. whether the bear had just went through the fence or if it was a bad set up. once the wire hits the ground the fence is out. if a bear would learn to push the posts over without touching the wire.....

i have a fence charger that operates on 4 d batteries, it is an us gov approved output for bear prevention. occasionaly my mares will run thru the ribbon electric fencing with this charger. if this happens i will use my higher power fence charger it will put an end to this behaviour. like therambler i have see dogs that will run through a fence even with a shock colar.

April 17, 2014
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