Dayhike Boots Advice Needed

12:56 p.m. on February 21, 2002 (EST)
(Guest)

After slipping on mud two hikes ago, and twisting my ankle on my last hike, I've realized I need better boots to compensate for my lack of balance and weak ankles. I am a novice day-hiker; day hikes of not usually more than 8 mi in the Sierra foothills. Terrain can be rocky and slippery. After extensive on-line shopping, I'm looking at the Vasque Exodus 2 Mid or Exodus 3. Really cheap as they're closeouts. My criteria is really sticky bottoms and ankle support. BTW, I'm female, and carry a light backpack. Any thoughts on the Exodus boot? Thanks for your patience with this long post.

7:33 a.m. on February 22, 2002 (EST)
(Guest)

Quote:

After slipping on mud two hikes ago, and twisting my ankle on my last hike, I've realized I need better boots to compensate for my lack of balance and weak ankles. I am a novice day-hiker; day hikes of not usually more than 8 mi in the Sierra foothills. Terrain can be rocky and slippery. After extensive on-line shopping, I'm looking at the Vasque Exodus 2 Mid or Exodus 3. Really cheap as they're closeouts. My criteria is really sticky bottoms and ankle support. BTW, I'm female, and carry a light backpack. Any thoughts on the Exodus boot? Thanks for your patience with this long post.


Do you use a hiking staff? Even using one will aid your stability enormously, especially in muddy going. Your ankles will strengthen with use - running will help here as well. I am not familiar with the Exodus, but I am a real fan of other Vasque models I have worn. Vasque, however, is just one of several very good manufacturers...

10:35 a.m. on February 22, 2002 (EST)
30 reviewer rep
1,238 forum posts
Got my wife the Vasque Vista GTX boots. She loves 'em!

n/m

11:59 a.m. on February 22, 2002 (EST)
(Guest)

Thanks for the reply, Ed and Hikerdon. Yup, poles are my next investment.

10:14 p.m. on February 22, 2002 (EST)
(Guest)

a.k.a. Don M, Don Morris, Don P. Morris

Quote:

Thanks for the reply, Ed and Hikerdon. Yup, poles are my next investment.

It doesn't have to be a big investment. I used for several years a mop handle that I found on the beach in a situation where I desperately needed a staff (wrist sprained in a tumble from my bike, muddy trails, etc. Worked very well. You will probably wind up with a fancy set of trekking poles since they do have some advantages.

11:54 a.m. on February 23, 2002 (EST)
(Guest)

Funny - I thought it would be silly of me to get specific gear for hiking since I'm only going on short day-hikes. But each time I've gone out I've injured myself in some way, and realize proper footwear- and yes, poles - are necessary for someone with my (lack of) skills. After so many years in a So Cal gym I can't tell you how much I enjoy being outside in the beautiful Sierra. Thanks for your help.

9:13 a.m. on March 7, 2002 (EST)
(Guest)

a.k.a. gt
Vasque and other great boots

I've hiked in the Vasque Sundowners for over 10 years now and love them. They fit my feet (skinny size 12 1/2, high arch) perfectly. I think that one of the most important things in picking a boot is not the manufacturer, but the shape of the design. Our feet vary widely in shape and size, and it's critical to find a style that suits you. I'm a former marathoner, and finding the right shoes probably had as much to do with competing well as the training. (If you run, you're probably aware that Nike makes great shoes for skinny feet, while New Balance really does well for the folks with wider feet. Of course, each company sells different styles.) I've got a buddy that hikes in cheap Coleman hiking boots, and he absolutely loves them. For his foot size and shape, they're perfect.

One thing I do really like about the Vasque in addition to the fit is the service they gave me. After wearing the first pair I had for 8 years on a weekly basis, the soles finally came loose while wading the Lamar River in Wyoming to collect track casts. I had to hike out with the boots wrapped in duct tape. On returning home, I took them by Diamond Brand (my favorite outfitter) and had 'em send the boots back to be repaired. About two weeks later they called me to the store and told me to just pick out a new pair - Vasque didn't feel that they could repair the boots to their standards, so they comped me a new pair. Now that's service!

When I got the first pair, I made the mistake of wearing them on a long trip up Slough Creek in Yellowstone with absolutely no break-in. I pulled up to the trailhead, put on the boots for the first time, and took off up the valley. By the time I hobbled into camp miles later, my ankles were rubbed raw by the stiff scree collar. By the time I headed back out, I was hiking down the sandy trail bootless. Then I decided to try wearing them wet to see if it would 'set' the leather. I hopped into the Lamar River at the end of the hike, waded around for a little while, then took off up Specimen Ridge in the softened boots. By the time they dried, they fit like a glove, and I never experienced another moment of discomfort. The second pair never gave a problem. If you have a pair of leather hikers that have a hot point, you might want to try that. I don't know if I was lucky, or if that was what really made a difference.

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