Limmer Lightweight Boots/Danner Boots

3:22 p.m. on April 11, 2002 (EDT)
(Guest)

a.k.a. Marc

To anyone who owns a pair of Limmer Lightweights,

Just bought a pair this year after reading many outstanding reviews about them. But I'm having a hard time getting them broken-in and forming to my feet. I've tried soaking them in water and walking with them but they still feel narrow across the forefoot and the flex point is causing me some pain. Any suggestions??

Also I've just come into a pair of Danner Shasta's. They seem to fit great but having some concerns. If anyone has used them I could use an opinon on them.

Thanks,

Marcus in Ontario

3:27 p.m. on April 11, 2002 (EDT)
(Guest)

Re: Limmer Lightweight Boots

I bought a pair of Lightweights last summer and wore them 3 or 4 times, not too happily. I had thought they'd be terrific like my Ultralights. Try a cobbler who can stretch them a bit for you. I hope mine get broken in this spring, but I doubt it because I just got some Lowa Renegades that feel fabulous.

9:08 p.m. on April 11, 2002 (EDT)
(Guest)

Danner Shastas

I haven't used the Danners, but have sold them for quite a while, and have seen & heard lots. What seems to be the problem? I may not be of much help, but I have seen a lot of the problems.

Katie

11:11 p.m. on April 11, 2002 (EDT)
(Guest)

a.k.a. Marc
Re: Danner Shastas

Quote:

I haven't used the Danners, but have sold them for quite a while, and have seen & heard lots. What seems to be the problem? I may not be of much help, but I have seen a lot of the problems.

Katie

The biggest concern I have so far is pressure on my instep right under the laces. It's only on one boot but since the bottom speed hook isn't the type that locks the laces I can't seem to loosen up the laces which are to be causing the pressure without loosening up the upper part of the boot as well. Not sure if I've explained that correctly but it's the best way I can describe the problem.

I'm wondering if this problem will persist or will go away as the boots break in more. I haven't worn them outside yet and I can still return them if I need to but I'm really happy with everything else this boot offers.

The other choices I have are the Explorer or the Vista. Since you've been selling these for a long time maybe you can comment on either of these two models as well.

I found that the Explorer's sole wasn't quite stiff enough for long distance backpacking so they were really my last choice.

Marcus

12:02 a.m. on April 12, 2002 (EDT)
(Guest)

Re: Danner Shastas

Hi Marcus,

Alright, you got me with one I haven't heard much. In other Danners, a too-tight instep could probably be corrected/alleviated by removing and-or tinkering with the removable insole, but since the Shasta's don't have that insole, no usefulness there. You comment on the lacing problem - how tight are the boots? Is it a problem that may be helped if you could get the laces right? Danner laces suck (in my humble opinion) - they are too slick. Try rubbing a candle on the portion of the laces that you want to "sticky" and see if you can adjust them better. They should stretch & give a little - don't expect too much though, esp. from the boots heavy on the glue around the sole (like the Shastas).

I don't know too much about the Vista... however, I really like the Explorer. Yes, the sole isn't as rigid, but the stitchdown construction (the sole sewn to the leather, compared with the Shasta and Vista, in which the soles are essentially glued to the sole) reduces the twisting of the sole, which should increase stability. But depending on the terrain, and your preferences, a stitchdown with a heavier sole may be in order (some of the hunting models may be worth looking at).

I hope something I've rambled about helps...

Katie

9:06 a.m. on April 12, 2002 (EDT)
(Guest)

Re: Danner Shastas

Quote:

Hi Marcus,

Alright, you got me with one I haven't heard much. In other Danners, a too-tight instep could probably be corrected/alleviated by removing and-or tinkering with the removable insole, but since the Shasta's don't have that insole, no usefulness there. You comment on the lacing problem - how tight are the boots? Is it a problem that may be helped if you could get the laces right? Danner laces suck (in my humble opinion) - they are too slick. Try rubbing a candle on the portion of the laces that you want to "sticky" and see if you can adjust them better. They should stretch & give a little - don't expect too much though, esp. from the boots heavy on the glue around the sole (like the Shastas).

I don't know too much about the Vista... however, I really like the Explorer. Yes, the sole isn't as rigid, but the stitchdown construction (the sole sewn to the leather, compared with the Shasta and Vista, in which the soles are essentially glued to the sole) reduces the twisting of the sole, which should increase stability. But depending on the terrain, and your preferences, a stitchdown with a heavier sole may be in order (some of the hunting models may be worth looking at).

I hope something I've rambled about helps...

Katie

Okay, thanks for the input Katie. As far as the lacing system goes I really believe that Danner needs to consider the locking lace hooks in the middle of the boot. This allows maximum adjustment of the lower laces while still allowing a tall boot like the shasta to be tightened down around the ankle. I had a pair of Salomon Authentic 8's which had these and it worked great. They're quite common on many different brands of boots and I was surprised that Danner wasn't using them. If you work at a store which is an authorized dealer for Danner maybe you could pass that on to the company rep.

Marcus

3:12 p.m. on April 12, 2002 (EDT)
(Guest)

I will do that... thanks for the input

Danner is usually pretty receptive to comments and suggestions like that.

11:21 p.m. on April 16, 2002 (EDT)
(Guest)

It's all in the lacing

I learned that you can do wonders with lacing from an online article. I did the opposite (tighten the toe box without tightening the top). Unfortunately i can't find the aritcle anymore and it's hard to describe in words. Here goes a try:

Lace the boots up through the first 3 or 4 eyelets, as far up as you want to be loose. Then cross the laces like you are going to tie a bow. Cross again, and again, until you have 3 or 4 twists in the laces lying across the tongue. Now continue lacing up the boot and pull tight. The top tightens but the bottom stays loose because of all the friction in the twists.

There are some more sophisticated things to do where you don't lace back and forth but, in certain places, up and down. Try the above first, though.

Good luck!

6:09 p.m. on April 17, 2002 (EDT)
(Guest)

a.k.a. Marc
Re: It's all in the lacing

Quote:

I learned that you can do wonders with lacing from an online article. I did the opposite (tighten the toe box without tightening the top). Unfortunately i can't find the aritcle anymore and it's hard to describe in words. Here goes a try:

Lace the boots up through the first 3 or 4 eyelets, as far up as you want to be loose. Then cross the laces like you are going to tie a bow. Cross again, and again, until you have 3 or 4 twists in the laces lying across the tongue. Now continue lacing up the boot and pull tight. The top tightens but the bottom stays loose because of all the friction in the twists.

There are some more sophisticated things to do where you don't lace back and forth but, in certain places, up and down. Try the above first, though.

Good luck!

marcusl,

thanks for the tip, that's something that I hadn't thought of and I'll certainly try it out.

marcus

11:50 a.m. on June 1, 2002 (EDT)
(Guest)

Re: It's all in the lacing

I have a pair too, which I got to tide me over until my Standards were made. The fit of the Lightweights isn't for everybody and there are limitations on what you can do. My suggestion is you call or email Peter at Limmer. Even though he doesn't make them himself [I think meindl makes those] he might be willing to give you some advice. Proper lacing obviously helps. The only thing I can say is the water trick doesn't really work. If they don't greak in through use, perhaps with a little oiing and proper drying and maybe even a little stretching with a cedar tree, not much else can be done.

Quote:

Quote:

I learned that you can do wonders with lacing from an online article. I did the opposite (tighten the toe box without tightening the top). Unfortunately i can't find the aritcle anymore and it's hard to describe in words. Here goes a try:

Lace the boots up through the first 3 or 4 eyelets, as far up as you want to be loose. Then cross the laces like you are going to tie a bow. Cross again, and again, until you have 3 or 4 twists in the laces lying across the tongue. Now continue lacing up the boot and pull tight. The top tightens but the bottom stays loose because of all the friction in the twists.

There are some more sophisticated things to do where you don't lace back and forth but, in certain places, up and down. Try the above first, though.

Good luck!

marcusl,

thanks for the tip, that's something that I hadn't thought of and I'll certainly try it out.

marcus

October 22, 2014
Quick Reply

Please sign in to reply

 
More Topics
This forum: Older: The 'scoop on McHale packs Newer: Bear Repellent
All forums: Older: rope clamp / rope grab Newer: quick trail meals