sleeping bag length

7:37 a.m. on September 5, 2002 (EDT)
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i am 5'7, and am looking for a bag for winter hiking and camping, should i get a long size so I have room for equip and water??

2:06 p.m. on September 5, 2002 (EDT)
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Yup

Quote:

i am 5'7, and am looking for a bag for winter hiking and camping, should i get a long size so I have room for equip and water??

I'm 5'9" and always get the long size to fit boot liners, water bottles, camera, other stuff I want to keep warm, or at least keep from freezing in winter. Bit lumpy sometimes, though.

5:05 p.m. on September 5, 2002 (EDT)
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flipside...

Quote:

i am 5'7, and am looking for a bag for winter hiking and camping, should i get a long size so I have room for equip and water??

Depends on the length of a standard bag. If 6', then might be long enough for all your goodies.

I'm 6'1" and some of my bags are "std" length. Why carry the extra weight and space?

Long length bags can be up to 6'6" or longer. Might be way too much extra.

Sometimes, less is more...

Brian in SLC

11:37 p.m. on September 5, 2002 (EDT)
(Guest)

a.k.a. me

i would stick with the standard size length of bags.. which is usually pretty close to 6'0. i am 5'11 and always get the standard length.. actually, my standard moonstone is for someone 5'9 but fits me perfectly. i would always try out the bag in the store or if you mail order it.. check it out at home before heading out on the trail. i camp in all year around and really dont have much problems with things freezing. ofcourse the coldest i really go camping is about 5-10 degrees... anything lower than that isn't much fun in my opinion. i've found that if you lay your waterbottle or boots, etc next to the exterior of your bag or sleeping pag.. your heat should keep them from freezing up completely. also, if you're like me.. and use a camelbak then it can sit out all night not in or near your bag and still not freeze. make sure to blow all the liquid in the tube back into the resivour. the theory is that 70 oz is too much liquid to freeze in an 8-9 hour timespan. i hope this helps. i agree with the other guy... dont carry extra weight. take only what you need. during winter camping.. your pack can get heavy enough with all the extra clothes, food and fuel by themselves.

2:52 p.m. on September 6, 2002 (EDT)
(Guest)

Quote:

i am 5'7, and am looking for a bag for winter hiking and camping, should i get a long size so I have room for equip and water??

I like Longs. I'm another 5'9" person (I prefer to think of it as 69 inches). I like the extra room not only for gear, but also for the extra slop room and comfort. So the bags that I have are all Longs, all specified to be for up to 6'6".

10:12 p.m. on May 14, 2004 (EDT)
(Guest)

a.k.a. Yegor Fefelov

I'll try to objective. The moore room you have in your sleeping bag, the moore air circulation, moore "cold spots" is what you get. From my experience roomy bags allow more cold inside them. And as mentioned it mean extra weight too. I like being technical, so i'd stick regular. To keep sensitive accessories from freeze damage, i would put them to the side of sleeping bag,if you camp with a partner - you can put stuff in between of you (unless you are freezing yourself); try to place the stuff on the sleeping pad and through your fleece jacket, down jacket, pants backpack, etc over it. It will have enough warmth from the side of your sleeping bag and enough insulation to keep it from freezing. That's an opinion. We have to keep in mind that what you like and the way you like it matters a lot too. : ) God Bless

September 22, 2014
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