Driloft sleeping bags - yes or no?

12:41 p.m. on December 6, 2002 (EST)
(Guest)

I'm looking to buy my first down winter bag mostly for use in the Rockies. I'll always be using either a tent or a bivy sack, so will a Driloft cover be worth the money? I've heard both good and bad reports about Driloft, the bad reports being that it actually traps moisture inside.

Opinions?

Also, for those of you who winter camp in the Rockies - what temperature rating do you use?

1:12 p.m. on December 6, 2002 (EST)
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Re: Driloft

Depends on whether you will be in a tent, bivy sack, snow cave, in the open, whatever. If you are in a tent or bivy sack, maybe even snow cave, microfiber is probably better than a waterproof/breathable outer. Having said that, I have been overall pretty happy with my -40F bag (from FF). FF and others have had problems with delamination of Driloft, though, enough that FF, ID, and others have pretty much stopped using it. After many winter nights in the Sierra, Rockies, elsewhere and many "nights" in the Alaska Range over the past 5 years, my bag is showing some delamination in the hood area. It isn't serious at this point, and FF has said they will replace the bag under their lifetime warranty (they noticed it when I sent the bag back for its annual cleaning and inspection).

As for trapping moisture, that depends on the conditions you use it. In dry cold conditions, Driloft works quite well in the way wp/b fabrics are supposed to - keeps spilled soup out and lets your body moisture (sweat) breathe through. Again, like all wp/b tend to do, if it is warmer outside and humid conditions (e.g., in the 25-35 F range, so the snow is wet), Driloft does not work as well, although it does breathe better than Goretex.

I would suggest looking at the microfiber types of outers. They are fairly water-repellent (keeps the spilled coffee out long enough to brush it off) and they do tend to wick the moisture out better than Driloft.

1:22 p.m. on December 6, 2002 (EST)
(Guest)

Quote:

I'm looking to buy my first down winter bag mostly for use in the Rockies. I'll always be using either a tent or a bivy sack, so will a Driloft cover be worth the money? I've heard both good and bad reports about Driloft, the bad reports being that it actually traps moisture inside.

DryLoft is good if potential for condensation/frost from poor ventilating tent/bivy (and/or really cold temps). A VBL will eliminate any potential for moisture on the inside of the bag. This happens in ALL bags - synth. or down Dryloft or not. A VBL will add a bonus few extra degrees of "felt" warmth. Wear a lite layer in the VBL and notice the diff...

Quote:

Opinions?

My opinion,
Marmot(my personal fav - had good experiences with their bags - super cold "CWM", cold "Col", and cool "Pinnacle"), Feathered Friends, Integral Designs, Western Mtning all excellent - the tops. Mtn Hrdwre, Moonstone, et al - Good/OK. TNF Down - bad (poor and inconsistent down baffle filling, insufficient loft, poor overall construction/ stitching/finish quality).

Quote:

Also, for those of you who winter camp in the Rockies - what temperature rating do you use?

Can't comment from experience in the US Rockies (~20 years winter camping gives me some idea), but a 0F bag w/VBL should get the job done nicely for what some friends have experienced there.

6:12 p.m. on December 7, 2002 (EST)
(Guest)

a.k.a. Kate F, solaceseeker
temp. ratings

I use a -9 celsius (sorry I have no idea what the F degrees is) down bag, a polar fleece liner bag, a thermarest and a ridge rest under that, and I am pretty toasty - I also have a down jacket and vest that double as blankets. Most of my winter camping is in pretty sheltered areas in Waterton/Glacier, and the Crowsnest Pass.

Sorry, I have no opinions on the DryLoft... my bag just has a Pertex shell, and I've never had any problems.

Happy wintering!

6:14 p.m. on December 9, 2002 (EST)
(Guest)

Re: Dryloft No

Save your money to get a better bag, or a bivy sack, or winter over bag.

This adds system flexibility while minimizing cost.
Also, the bag will be lighter and more compressible if it has a regular nylon, or say pertex shell.

Bring the bivy sack when you need it. And if you don't, then don't!

I look at it as a cash grab.
If I'm that worried about my bag getting wet, I can just pack it INSIDE the bivy sack.

Barry Z

5:31 p.m. on December 16, 2002 (EST)
(Guest)

Re: Driloft

Annual Checkup and cleaning? Does your sleeping bag have it's own health plan?

11:15 p.m. on December 17, 2002 (EST)
(Guest)

Quote:

I'm looking to buy my first down winter bag mostly for use in the Rockies. I'll always be using either a tent or a bivy sack, so will a Driloft cover be worth the money? I've heard both good and bad reports about Driloft, the bad reports being that it actually traps moisture inside.

Opinions?

Also, for those of you who winter camp in the Rockies - what temperature rating do you use?

11:19 p.m. on December 17, 2002 (EST)
(Guest)

I'm surprised by some of the negative comments about Dryloft. I use two bags: a big FF for the Arctic and other really cold places and an Integral Designs for warmer trips. Each one has a dryloft shell. I've been very happy with it. I use them inside a tent or bivy and I think it has saved me a few times because external moisture is fairly inevitable. I do agree that dryloft is quite expensive. It also is quite a bit less moisture proof than PTFE but for me the balance between that and breathability works very well.

August 23, 2014
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