One More Question Re: Sleeping Bags

5:08 p.m. on January 28, 2003 (EST)
(Guest)

I am a warm sleeper, zipping and unzipping all during the night. It is my feeling that a 0 degree bag might just be too warm for me, as I do not anticipate camping in temps colder than 20 degrees (my camping buddy won't go if it's that cold) . Maybe I should go with a 10 degree or 15 degree bag? I know you guys said that temp ratings for bags differ. I'm still confused.

Geez, buying a car isn't this difficult!

6:33 p.m. on January 28, 2003 (EST)
37 reviewer rep
747 forum posts

Quote:

I am a warm sleeper, zipping and unzipping all during the night. It is my feeling that a 0 degree bag might just be too warm for me, as I do not anticipate camping in temps colder than 20 degrees (my camping buddy won't go if it's that cold) . Maybe I should go with a 10 degree or 15 degree bag? I know you guys said that temp ratings for bags differ. I'm still confused.


OK you are a warm sleeper and your camping partner won't go if its below 20 degrees. Go for a 15 degree bag, or carry warm clothes and combine them to keep you warm in your bag. Or do you have a couple of summer bags that you can put one inside the other. Or do you have a Summer bag that just needs an over bag to extend its range? Zero degree bags tend to be bulky and heavy, do you have enough pack space? Will you pull a sled when its cold - I do, so who cares how bulky my bag is? Do you have a snowmobile suit or down pants, these can extend the range of any sleeping bag a lot, and finally - its really hard to get hypothermia in any sleeping bag at any temperature. Are you willing to be a bit cool here and there? I thought I nearly froze to death once when it was 40 below, but didn't even come close, just cold. Unless yer shivering a lot its not that cold and you said you have a camping partner - snuggle up - one side will be warm.
Jim S

7:23 p.m. on January 28, 2003 (EST)
(Guest)

Temp Ratings

I know how you feel about deciding on a big gear purchase, it can get really excrutiating! I just bought my new sleeping bag after weeks of deliberation, and what a relief!

Anyway, your question:

Temp ratings on sleeping bags can differ slight from company to company, as high end companies will rate their bags more "conservatively", and bargain brands' ratings will be pretty optimistic (i.e. a 15* from Marmot will almost deffinitely be warmer than a Campmor *15). To REALLY compare warmth between bags, you have to move past the ratings to fill weight, loft, and internal dimensions. But if your planning on getting a bag from any of the major gear brands, the difference is going to be pretty negligable.

The other variable is temp ratings is the actual user. There are tons of things which influence how warm you are at night: like the food you just ate, your physical condition, how tired you are, etc. but you've already identified that you sleep pretty warm, so I'd say you certainly don't need a 0* if you won't be going below 20*. Common advise for buying a bag is too think of the coldest temps you expect to encounter, and then add a few degree's of insurance. But I think you would be fine in either a 15* or 20* (most bags in that range are very similar in terms of warmth), and as Jim said simply put on some layers (especially a hat!) in the bag if you're pushing the temp rating. I've found that putting on my cold weather camp cloths brings the rating down 5-10* on my 20* bag (and I'm a pretty cold sleeper.)

Good luck in you decision, and let us know what you end up with!

Happy Hiking,

Daniel

6:21 a.m. on January 29, 2003 (EST)
30 reviewer rep
1,238 forum posts
Go with the 0 degree!

Give yourself plenty of room for the variables - especially if you are in temps colder than 20 degrees F.

As you said you can always unzip the bag. It has been my experience that it is much easier to cool off than get warmed up in the middle of the night.

5:30 p.m. on January 29, 2003 (EST)
(Guest)

Re: Go with the 0 degree!

Ed, How much does the Marmot Merlin Regular weigh? I want to consider the weight for backpacking and the description does not give the weight.

Thanks.

7:12 p.m. on January 29, 2003 (EST)
(Guest)

a.k.a. sc
Re: Go with the 0 degree!

Hiker Girl

I AGREE with Ed!!! Go with the 0 degree (already)! I've used 25 degree bags, 15 degree bags,and 0 degree bags. I've never found one that's totally accurate for all people. When I've been below 20, and particularly below 10, I've been really glad I was a little warm instead of a lot cold.

LIke my other post, the Exponent Summit 0 is about 5 lbs, and a great deal. The Marmot Trestle at Campmor costs a little more, but is a little lighter and rated at 0 is STILL a good deal.

Just don't try to second guess too much, and if you're gonna err, err on the low-risk side.

btw, I love my Summit 0 degree. Contrary to some posts, it's a great bag. But at below 10 or 5, it gets pretty cool!

 


Quote:

Give yourself plenty of room for the variables - especially if you are in temps colder than 20 degrees F.

As you said you can always unzip the bag. It has been my experience that it is much easier to cool off than get warmed up in the middle of the night.

6:15 a.m. on January 30, 2003 (EST)
30 reviewer rep
1,238 forum posts
I think it weighs in at ~3.5 lbs. n/m

nm

October 1, 2014
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