Atlas Snowshoes

12:42 a.m. on October 16, 2003 (EDT)
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Guys- a spin-off of my winter camping thread, but more specific. I just saw what looked like a good deal on Atlas 1025 snowshoes. They seem suitable enough for my purposes (Yosemite, but nothing too radical). My other choice was the MSR Ascent but after doing some reading and Bill's seal of approval, Atlas seems a good choice. If they will fit on my Asolo 101's (this I need to check out)they seem a good choice. I know there is a 1225 but kind of pricey for me and maybe more than I need-any thoughts? As always, thanks for the advice.

9:57 a.m. on October 16, 2003 (EDT)
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Quote:

Guys- a spin-off of my winter camping thread, but more specific. I just saw what looked like a good deal on Atlas 1025 snowshoes.

Tom: How big are they? How big are you? How much does yer pack weigh? Add you and say 40 pounds of pack and then look at the snowshoe weight rating - are they big enough to not sink in too far? Snow conditions are what determines this more than anything and even if you think you aren't going to do any thing radical, the snow may still be very light and fluffy which equals sinking in. You may need the larger more expensive ones unless yer a little guy... (;->)
Have you found poles with large baskets? Snowshoeing poles are best being rigid - the correct length - and haveing larger baskets than ski poles.
Jim S

11:54 a.m. on October 16, 2003 (EDT)
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The 1025s are what I have, 3 pair. Well, one is with Young Son in Colorado these days. One of mine is an original 1025, but with the bindings upgraded twice, currently with one of the ratchet versions (much nicer than the original velcro type). That one has been with me on Denali 4 times and used for packing up to 60 pound packs other places (I had my climbing gear along as well as winter expedition camping stuff). The other two (the one in Colorado and the other one here that Barbara uses sometimes) have newer bindings as well, but not the ratchet straps. These days Barbara mostly uses her women's racing model, which is basically the size of the 1020.

I do not think you need the 1033 (largest size in the 10- series) for anything you said you want to do in Yosemite. I have used my 1025s in deep champagne powder in the Tetons with heavy loads and no serious problem (that type of powder is great for skiing, but pretty much any type of snowshoe or ski will sink in a couple feet - except the Snowshoe Thompson 8 foot long super wide skis that you see in museums in the Sierra).

I sometimes use my Scarpa Invernos on my 1025s, and sometimes my Sorel Caribous. At the other extreme, I have also used my Adidas trail-running shoes - got wet feet after a few miles, but they fit just fine. Snowshoe bindings have a very wide range of adjustment. I have put them on small scouts (size 12 kids and on larger scouts (for some reason, 16 and 17 yr old boys these days seem to have size 14 adult feet - don't know why they would need the snowshoes anyway). The bindings adjust to fit them all just fine, although the 14-adult boots are pushing the limits on the large end.

11:58 a.m. on October 16, 2003 (EDT)
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Forgot to add. I do not think that you need the 12-series or expedition series for your uses. If you have a bargain on the 1025s, grab them. They work just fine for backpacking. The 8-series are suitable for day hikes, but probably are too light-duty for extensive backpacking with heavy loads. I do know people who use them for that sort of thing, though, and find them adequate.

1:29 p.m. on October 16, 2003 (EDT)
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Thanks Bill. I saw them online new for $140 so that sounds like a pretty good deal. I only weigh 140 so even with a 40 lb. pack, I'm in the middle of the weight range listed on their chart. I'll be a rank beginner on them, but I'd they be a bit more than I need than not enough.

Quote:

Forgot to add. I do not think that you need the 12-series or expedition series for your uses. If you have a bargain on the 1025s, grab them. They work just fine for backpacking. The 8-series are suitable for day hikes, but probably are too light-duty for extensive backpacking with heavy loads. I do know people who use them for that sort of thing, though, and find them adequate.

10:02 p.m. on October 16, 2003 (EDT)
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Jim, I'm only 140 so I'm pretty sure they'll work-better, I already ordered them-hehe. The guy on the phone at Snow Leopard (online gear) who I called with questions about them told me he'd had a pair for a couple of years and he weighed 180. He'd used them all over Colorado. As for poles, I've got a pair of Leki trekking poles with snow baskets, but maybe I'll get rigids if those work better. I've never even seen snowshoe poles-who sells them? I take it they look like more macho ski poles. Thanks.

Quote:

Quote:

Guys- a spin-off of my winter camping thread, but more specific. I just saw what looked like a good deal on Atlas 1025 snowshoes.

Tom: How big are they? How big are you? How much does yer pack weigh? Add you and say 40 pounds of pack and then look at the snowshoe weight rating - are they big enough to not sink in too far? Snow conditions are what determines this more than anything and even if you think you aren't going to do any thing radical, the snow may still be very light and fluffy which equals sinking in. You may need the larger more expensive ones unless yer a little guy... (;->)
Have you found poles with large baskets? Snowshoeing poles are best being rigid - the correct length - and haveing larger baskets than ski poles.
Jim S

11:45 p.m. on October 16, 2003 (EDT)
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Hmm, too bad you can't edit these things-Doh! The obvious answer to my question is "anyone who makes snowshoes", which I found out after a few minutes of looking around on the net. But, they just look more or less like my Leki's, except cheaper-collapsible with twist collars-2 or 3 piece. Didn't see any one-piece ones, which is what I presume you mean by rigid. Oh, forgot to mention, the guy at Mountain Leopard also highly recommended the Mountainsmith sled (which I guess is now the Kifaru) with poles-said towing a sled made a world of difference from a big heavy pack.

Quote:

Jim, I'm only 140 so I'm pretty sure they'll work-better, I already ordered them-hehe. The guy on the phone at Snow Leopard (online gear) who I called with questions about them told me he'd had a pair for a couple of years and he weighed 180. He'd used them all over Colorado. As for poles, I've got a pair of Leki trekking poles with snow baskets, but maybe I'll get rigids if those work better. I've never even seen snowshoe poles-who sells them? I take it they look like more macho ski poles. Thanks.

Quote:

Quote:

Guys- a spin-off of my winter camping thread, but more specific. I just saw what looked like a good deal on Atlas 1025 snowshoes.

Tom: How big are they? How big are you? How much does yer pack weigh? Add you and say 40 pounds of pack and then look at the snowshoe weight rating - are they big enough to not sink in too far? Snow conditions are what determines this more than anything and even if you think you aren't going to do any thing radical, the snow may still be very light and fluffy which equals sinking in. You may need the larger more expensive ones unless yer a little guy... (;->)
Have you found poles with large baskets? Snowshoeing poles are best being rigid - the correct length - and haveing larger baskets than ski poles.
Jim S

11:17 a.m. on October 17, 2003 (EDT)
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747 forum posts

Quote:

Hmm, too bad you can't edit these things-Doh! The obvious answer to my question is "anyone who makes snowshoes", which I found out after a few minutes of looking around on the net. But, they just look more or less like my Leki's, except cheaper-collapsible with twist collars-2 or 3 piece. Didn't see any one-piece ones, which is what I presume you mean by rigid.

Tom
I only said they were better - didn't say you could actually buy them anymore. (:->) The only problem with trekking poles it that they have even smaller baskets than normal ski poles. Use what ever you have but larger baskets are better. At one time you could buy large accessory baskets, but that may be a thing of the past. Old rigid ski poles would work, but the only problem is in deep soft snow. You may find yourself laying in soft snow at which point you may have to reach down and undo the snowshoes, get up and then climb back onto your snowshoes and reattach them. With tiny baskets on your poles they just sink into the snow and don't offer much help. If the snow is more solid most anythig will work because the poles really only act to help you balance as you walk - you don't really push with them like when you ski.
I have a pair of Atlas snowshoes but can't seen to find a model number on them.

1:31 p.m. on October 17, 2003 (EDT)
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Snowshoe poles and Atlas Snowshoes

The only *real* difference between trekking, ski, and snowshoe poles is the label. Yeah, there are supposedly differences in the baskets. Gotta disagree that trekking poles have smaller baskets (except for some that are sold without any basket at all). You just say that, Jim, because you haven't been to a downhill resort in the past decade. I occasionally stoop to going to one, and have observed that the "baskets" have become vestigial, hardly there at all. Something about the racers want them small to cut air resistance, and since everyone aspires to look like a racer (including first day beginners), the baskets have gotten cut way down (and the poles bent to tuck behind you on that fast downhill run). Yeah, there are still rigid onepiece poles, they're just bent for racer streamlining.

Ok, to get semi-serious and semi-truthful for a second (always take what OGBO posts with a big grain of salt), I have a pair of REI trekking poles I got on super sale. Turns out they are made by Komperdell, who also made some adjustable ski poles for a Big Name high price manufacturer. The baskets are interchangeable with backcountry ski baskets and powder baskets from Komperdell. Barbara got a pair of the made-by-Komperdell "shock absorbing" trekking poles, which take the same baskets (she locked out the shock absorbers after the first 10 miles or so of hiking, but they were on sale, after all). You can still find rigid poles at the mass-market ski stores, and if you look carefully, you can make sure they will take powder baskets that you find in the BC ski specialty shops. This is a cheap way to get reasonable snowshoe poles.

Jim, IIRC, your snowshoes are the same as mine, and so are 1025s. Atlas did not put labels on the snowshoes during most years. You can tell the difference mainly by looking at the shape of the frame and the binding (except when someone like me has gotten updated bindings). Don't know what will happen now that Atlas has been sold to another snowshoe manufacturer.

5:51 p.m. on October 17, 2003 (EDT)
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Snowshoe baskets - bah humbug

Quote:

You just say that, Jim, because you haven't been to a downhill resort in the past decade. I occasionally stoop to going to one, and have observed that the "baskets" have become vestigial, hardly there at all.

The baskets are interchangeable with backcountry ski baskets and powder baskets from Komperdell. and if you look carefully, you can make sure they will take powder baskets that you find in the BC ski specialty shops. This is a cheap way to get reasonable snowshoe poles.

I remember back when the baskets were about 7-8 inches in diameter (made of beant bamboo) and they tied to the poles (wood of course) with leather straps. Now those were snowshoe poles... (;->) So Bill - do you have the name of a place that sells larger baskets that will go onto modern ski poles?

Note to Tom - ya see sonny, some times when us old geezers give ya advice you have to remember that the advice might be a tad out of date, but the principal is still right on. I can also advise on how to make your arrowheads...

On the other hand, I've only snowhoed once in the past decade or so, so why should I want larger baskets? - skis are too cool. All the leather binding straps kind get in the way though. I _have_ _actually_ used swiss bear traps - meaning the skis strapped to the boots with leather belts and buckles - and people didn't break legs anymore than they do now with quick release bindings. Atleast with the old ones you were never airborn and watched a ski separate from yer boot!
jim S

6:06 p.m. on October 17, 2003 (EDT)
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Re: Snowshoe poles and Atlas Snowshoes

Ah yes, the old label trick. This reminds me of stuff marked "marine", as in "marine battery"-same as a car battery but higher price. My Leki baskets are just under 4" across, so I might go down to REI or a local ski shop to see about bigger ones. I have a feeling that worrying about what poles I have when I fall over will be the last thing I'm thinking about.

Quote:

The only *real* difference between trekking, ski, and snowshoe poles is the label. Yeah, there are supposedly differences in the baskets. Gotta disagree that trekking poles have smaller baskets (except for some that are sold without any basket at all). You just say that, Jim, because you haven't been to a downhill resort in the past decade. I occasionally stoop to going to one, and have observed that the "baskets" have become vestigial, hardly there at all. Something about the racers want them small to cut air resistance, and since everyone aspires to look like a racer (including first day beginners), the baskets have gotten cut way down (and the poles bent to tuck behind you on that fast downhill run). Yeah, there are still rigid onepiece poles, they're just bent for racer streamlining.

Ok, to get semi-serious and semi-truthful for a second (always take what OGBO posts with a big grain of salt), I have a pair of REI trekking poles I got on super sale. Turns out they are made by Komperdell, who also made some adjustable ski poles for a Big Name high price manufacturer. The baskets are interchangeable with backcountry ski baskets and powder baskets from Komperdell. Barbara got a pair of the made-by-Komperdell "shock absorbing" trekking poles, which take the same baskets (she locked out the shock absorbers after the first 10 miles or so of hiking, but they were on sale, after all). You can still find rigid poles at the mass-market ski stores, and if you look carefully, you can make sure they will take powder baskets that you find in the BC ski specialty shops. This is a cheap way to get reasonable snowshoe poles.

Jim, IIRC, your snowshoes are the same as mine, and so are 1025s. Atlas did not put labels on the snowshoes during most years. You can tell the difference mainly by looking at the shape of the frame and the binding (except when someone like me has gotten updated bindings). Don't know what will happen now that Atlas has been sold to another snowshoe manufacturer.

11:19 p.m. on October 17, 2003 (EDT)
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Re: Snowshoe baskets - bah humbug

Actually Jim, I bet I'm much closer to your age than you think. I just wasted much of my youth underwater, instead of in the mountains and haven't been able to get up there much now that I live in LA. I did find a pair of Komperdell baskets-they don't exactly fit, but they'll work with the Leki mini-baskets screwed on below them (Leki pole ends are threaded for baskets)to hold them in place. Hey, any advice I get is much appreciated, as long as it doesn't start out "first, skin a bear..."

Quote:

You just say that, Jim, because you haven't been to a downhill resort in the past decade. I occasionally stoop to going to one, and have observed that the "baskets" have become vestigial, hardly there at all.

Quote:

The baskets are interchangeable with backcountry ski baskets and powder baskets from Komperdell. and if you look carefully, you can make sure they will take powder baskets that you find in the BC ski specialty shops. This is a cheap way to get reasonable snowshoe poles.

I remember back when the baskets were about 7-8 inches in diameter (made of beant bamboo) and they tied to the poles (wood of course) with leather straps. Now those were snowshoe poles... (;->) So Bill - do you have the name of a place that sells larger baskets that will go onto modern ski poles?

Note to Tom - ya see sonny, some times when us old geezers give ya advice you have to remember that the advice might be a tad out of date, but the principal is still right on. I can also advise on how to make your arrowheads...

On the other hand, I've only snowhoed once in the past decade or so, so why should I want larger baskets? - skis are too cool. All the leather binding straps kind get in the way though. I _have_ _actually_ used swiss bear traps - meaning the skis strapped to the boots with leather belts and buckles - and people didn't break legs anymore than they do now with quick release bindings. Atleast with the old ones you were never airborn and watched a ski separate from yer boot!
jim S

6:17 p.m. on October 19, 2003 (EDT)
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Powder baskets

... So Bill - do you have the name of a place that sells larger baskets that will go onto modern ski poles?

Paco, for one. Although that is a bit of a drive for Tom, seeing as how he is in Smoggytown. Several sources advertise in Backcountry and Couloir.

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