solo tents

2:41 p.m. on June 14, 2004 (EDT)
(Guest)

I'm looking for a solid one person tent or a bivy sack. Would prefer a tent so I have some head room and such, but I'm trying to go as light as possible (3 pounds or less?). Any recommendations? Price, as usual, is a factor.

P.S. I'm 6'4" so no short tents please.

8:14 p.m. on June 14, 2004 (EDT)
(Guest)

How much is price a factor?

Might want to try the Alps Mountaineering Mystique 1.5 or 2. They also make a 1.0, but the front entry and the vestibule configuration are not the best design on the 1.0. Anyway, the Alps Mystique is a solid product for the price (except for the 1.0, that is). Also may want to look at the Eureka Back Country - I think that one's only about 4 lbs or so. Also the Timberlite - classic design.

Lastly, Coleman / Peak 1 has a couple of good deals - the Cobra (probably a little short for you) and the Inyo - both at around 4 lbs or so and inexpensive. Bass Pro near my house just had some Inyos on sale for around 55 bucks or so.

I really don't think "under 3 lbs" and "price is a factor" go in the same sentence for a really reliable product. But good luck.

br

12:42 a.m. on June 15, 2004 (EDT)
(Guest)

The Mistique and Coleman Inyo 2 (= Peak1 Cobra) are similar in design to the Zoids. The older Cobra is lighter than the newer Inyo 2. You can google them for more reviews (see the top of this board as well) and specs.

I used the older Cobra for 2 seasons before I bought a Microzoid. There is definitely a price and quality difference between the Zoids and the Cobra. But my Cobra (bought it used) never leaked a drop or rain during a 2-day downpour at Big Sandy in Wind River.

I recently traded the Microzoid for a Kelty Crestone 1 because I want more headroom. You can get the Crestone 1 shipped for $90 in the US.

1:18 a.m. on June 15, 2004 (EDT)
(Guest)

PS on Crestone 1.

The Crestone 1 weighs just over 3.5lb and not really 4lb as described in some website. My Crestone 1 is shipped with a Crestone 2 stuff sac. First time in my life, I don't really need to STUFF a tent but just to drop it in the stuff sac.

Tent size is a very personal thing. It doesn't matter what we recommend, you may still want to take its specs, chalk out an outline, and see if it fits your body's LxWxH. You can sit under a table and get a feel of the height of a tent as well. The Crestone is a pretty new tent; and as of last week (June 04) there is still no user/owner review on the web.

The Cobra has a large footprint (coverage area) and uses at least 7 pegs to set up. I only need 3 pegs to set up the Crestone 1 or the Microzoid. Still, my old and trusty SD Divine Light needs only 2 pegs and sport a very slim outline. A slim outline is a plus if you make camp in an un-established or off-trail spot, e.g. between trees, rocky or sloping grounds... Good luck soloing :-}

6:03 a.m. on June 15, 2004 (EDT)
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I once had the Eureka Gossamer and liked it.

Just a little too small for my needs - I like to store stuff and be able to put on rain gear inside the tent.

But, I will admit the Gossamer is very light, has very good ventillation and very storm proof.

Weighs in at about 2.5 lbs and I have seen them on sale as low as $59.95.

11:32 a.m. on June 16, 2004 (EDT)
(Guest)

MSR Hubba

Hey.

The Hubba is a killer solo! Really rock solid set up. A little pricier, but worth it when it comes to durability and solid pitch.

N'E

1:02 a.m. on June 18, 2004 (EDT)
MODERATOR
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You might look in the forums on www.backpacking.net for info on light shelters. I know Jim S has given up on them because some of the advice from the ultralight fanatics is a bit sketchy, but there are lot of posts regarding tents.
The Hilleberg Akto gets good reviews (I've never seen one in person myself) but they are pricey. There is a post on the site with a long list of lightweight shelters organized by weight-I can post it here if anyone is interested.

Quote:

I'm looking for a solid one person tent or a bivy sack. Would prefer a tent so I have some head room and such, but I'm trying to go as light as possible (3 pounds or less?). Any recommendations? Price, as usual, is a factor.

P.S. I'm 6'4" so no short tents please.

12:14 p.m. on June 18, 2004 (EDT)
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Hilleberg and others

Hilleberg tents are pretty light for the capacity. They are actually a lot like Stevenson tents, which are pretty popular with the ultralight crowd. But Hilleberg doesn't meet the fire-resistance standards in some states. I talked to Bo Hilleberg (he goes by "Hilleberg the Tentmaker", as in "Omar the Tentmaker") about this last year and he says it is actually the required tests - they are too expensive to carry out for the small number of states that require them, although he claimed the tents are as fire resistant as any on the market.

His tents are generally tunnel tents, which means they are not free-standing (same with Stevenson). I used to have a Sierra Designs Sleeve Flashlight, which was 3.5 pounds with stakes. It was a reasonably generous 1 person or "friendly" 2 person tent. The current version, the Clip Flashlight, is 5+ pounds with stakes, so I can't recommend it for your use. This despite the much larger use of screening in the walls, partly because of the larger fly (to provide a small vestibule), partly because the plastic clips are heavier than the old pole sleeves, and partly because with the old version you could set it up with 4 pegs and the new one requires a dozen to pitch properly.

But several other companies have tents similar to the old Sleeve Flashlight that are quite light. Look in the Campmor and Sierra Trading Post catalogs.

8:45 p.m. on June 20, 2004 (EDT)
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747 forum posts

Quote:

I'm looking for a solid one person tent or a bivy sack. Would prefer a tent so I have some head room and such, but I'm trying to go as light as possible (3 pounds or less?). Any recommendations? Price, as usual, is a factor.

Will bugs be a problem? If you really want to go light - carry a tarp. Yep I said that - I can't believe it either but a tarp is light and can have good headroom. I made my tarp into a tent with mosquito netting on the bottom BTW.
Jim S
Hi Bill, Hi Tom (:->)

5:46 p.m. on June 21, 2004 (EDT)
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tarps

Quote:

Will bugs be a problem? If you really want to go light - carry a tarp. Yep I said that - I can't believe it either but a tarp is light and can have good headroom. I made my tarp into a tent with mosquito netting on the bottom BTW.
Jim S
Hi Bill, Hi Tom (:->)

Hi, Jim.

Anyway, Greg, I have used a very lightweight bivy (5 ounce) plus very lightweight tarp (7 ounce) with my hiking poles to string the tarp, plus some mosquito netting when bugs were about. The hiking poles are the thing that boosts the weight to the 3 pound level (ever weigh your hiking poles? might as well get double duty out of them) Or a slightly heavier bivy that has mosquito netting. The problem when bugs are about is that when you are cooking and trying to eat, the bugs tend to get into the food (hey, it's just a bit more protein!). At certain seasons, almost everywhere in the world, the bugs (mosquitos, black flies, noseeums) can be a real nuisance.

With a bivy and a tarp, you can sit up all you want, even in a fairly heavy downpour.

On our superlightweight Crown Valley outing a couple years back, I used a bivy with no tarp (no threat of rain) and Jim used a light tent. Even with all the extra electronic goodies and a couple liters of water each at the trailhead, we were each in the low 20 pound range. Jim could have been much lighter if he had left the night vision scope at home ;>D!!!

8:51 p.m. on June 21, 2004 (EDT)
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Tom, could you post a link to that list?

11:29 p.m. on June 22, 2004 (EDT)
37 reviewer rep
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really light

Quote:

The hiking poles are the thing that boosts the weight to the 3 pound level (ever weigh your hiking poles? might as well get double duty out of them)

On our superlightweight Crown Valley outing a couple years back, I used a bivy with no tarp (no threat of rain) and Jim used a light tent. Even with all the extra electronic goodies and a couple liters of water each at the trailhead, we were each in the low 20 pound range. Jim could have been much lighter if he had left the night vision scope at home ;>D!!!

Jim S- Its no fun leaving the NVG at home, and now of course I need a digital camera and a battry powered tooth brush! I _CAN_ go much lighter than I do, but what fun would it be to leave the "Mission hardware" behind? Gasp - what about my fly rod??????????

Anyway I bought a Golite day pack - 2200". Its the "Ray Way' model - supposed to weigh 10.5 oz but weighs 13.5 oz.

My base weight with this pack, my 24 oz sleeping bag, DAM, tarp-tent, water filter and alcohol stove is 12.5 pounds, add food and water. I hang my tent from a catenary curve in a tight cord stretched above the tent. The tie tabs in the center of the top of my tarp tent can come up over the cord and tie, allowing some adjustment of the tension distribution.

P.S. a nice mosquito net goes a long way. Look at the "camper's mosquito net" in the campmoor catelog, then buy one. You can tie it from a limb by buggy lake and have a bug free space to hang out. [You can also camp under it with or with out the tarp.]

Jim S (:->)
The pack is pretty awesome, and kind of unstructured with no waist band, but carrying these weights you can get away with a lot.

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