It's the little things.......

12:12 p.m. on June 14, 2008 (EDT)
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Sometimes it's the little things that prove to be the most interesting or annoying. I don't do a lot of thru hiking anymore, I just kinda work my way into a pristine area for a few days and try to get a feel for that particular area.
Each watershed, mountain top, or plateau has it's own ecosystem, sights, and sounds, you know?
I enjoy taking pictures of things that are unique to that area like venus fly traps, hellbenders(salamanders),old homesteads,rock composition,plants, ect. I also enjoy fishing in streams and have to find out what types of insects (fish food) are abundant in that watershed. I like to be engaged with my surroundings.

I thought it would be cool to hear about the little things that are unique in the areas you guys frequent. Sure, I know I could research it, but that's not the same as getting a hikers perspective, and hearing a story about your trip.

4:31 p.m. on June 14, 2008 (EDT)
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Discovering sundews (carnivorous plants). smack in the middle of an area of land that was previously a coal strip mine, is one of the little thing I've enjoyed lately.

4:56 p.m. on June 14, 2008 (EDT)
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i live in southwestern bc and we often have a short alpine season, but during those 3 maybe 4 months of the year when everything comes to life, there is an abundance of wild berries, blue berries, black ber, huckle ber, salmon ber, its a great way to spend the day, feasting on these semi un tainted fresh fruits, very enjoyable

6:07 p.m. on June 14, 2008 (EDT)
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Coal mines are devastating. We have a lot around here.
That's a lot of berries eh!

8:54 a.m. on June 16, 2008 (EDT)
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Evidence of abandoned human habitation - coming across a foundation or tumbledown building nearly reabsorbed into the landscape. These things remind me of how fragile we and what we create really are and how easily evidence of our passing can fade away.

10:58 a.m. on June 16, 2008 (EDT)
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Fred, I would agree. Backpacking through the various state parks here in Ohio, you can see the evidence of past homesteads, mining towns, Indian trails, etc. It's always a sacred experience for me because I think about what life must have been like for these people in the 1800s.

As for mining, there is a backpacking trail (Wildcat Hollow) in Wayne National Forest in Ohio where you have to bring in your own water because the water there is still undrinkable due to the mining activity that occured during the Civil War.

12:44 p.m. on June 16, 2008 (EDT)
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tbastress - that's how it is here in PA - once in a while you'll run into a church yard and remains of a church that's not been tended to for decades (especially if you're an "off trail map and compass in hand" type of hiker rather than a "stick to the trails" type of person) - farm steads and the like are far more common - these things just reminds me of how fragile we really are -

It'd be interesting to organize a dig in some of these sites - but giving people the coordinates would just invite abuse - better to leave them for future generations!

10:09 p.m. on June 17, 2008 (EDT)
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Hey Fred I know where a moonshine still is located and about a half mile from that is a ravine with old cars dumped in it. I don't know how many people know about it, but it is really neat to think about those people and what their lives must have been like!

tbastress, was that a coal mine, or some other type of mine?
I love old indian areas and trails.

1:48 p.m. on June 18, 2008 (EDT)
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Trouthunter, yes, they are coal mines. There were a lot of iron furnaces in the SE Ohio area, and coal mining continued into the 20th century.

6:04 p.m. on June 18, 2008 (EDT)
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I tend to backpack the same way. Never have been a through Hiker. I prefer to thoroughly check out a destination. Bag a few peaks, fish the local waters, and truly absorb your surroundings. Little things in the Sierra can be abundant. How about the sound of the birds chirping out their rhythms...large chunks of granite crumbling from a jagged peak...your dog toying with army ants in the dirt.

6:39 p.m. on June 18, 2008 (EDT)
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Quote:

Evidence of abandoned human habitation - coming across a foundation or tumbledown building nearly reabsorbed into the landscape. These things remind me of how fragile we and what we create really are and how easily evidence of our passing can fade away.

It's called ecological succession. Our mother earth is doing her best to take back what belongs to her, every minute of every hour of every day. Want more evidence? Look to see if there is grass growing through a crack in your sidewalk. maybe even a maple sapling? Actually, seeing that is one of the little things I enjoy when I'm in an urban setting. It helps me to remember what things were like WAAAYYY back when, and I relish the thought that things will someday return to that state.

7:36 p.m. on June 18, 2008 (EDT)
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f_klock, everything but the internet I hope! Ha I like to see that kind of stuff too, why does everything have to be so concrete? I'm tired of things that ding, beep, ring, it's so annoying. Being in the wilderness is so much more peaceful!

jerkyburps, I think we tend to miss a lot of cool stuff when we focus on a distant destination, and what kind of time we are making, that is what I used to do anyway. I'm sure it is possible to do both, but I was always checking my watch and the map, not noticing the natural wonders under my feet!

8:30 p.m. on June 18, 2008 (EDT)
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Quote:

f_klock, everything but the internet I hope! Ha


Remember when you could IM by hollering from one peak to another? Still can, people forget that sometimes.

9:19 p.m. on June 18, 2008 (EDT)
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Me send um up smoke, server too slow!

1:04 p.m. on June 19, 2008 (EDT)
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Sitting by a stream in the Olympics for over an hour with my family in the natural quiet, watching a mother duck teach her brood how to fish.

It is still one of my favorite memories...

Or the time I took my kids up near Mount Ranier to watch the "Earth Grazers" during the Perseids for one of the greatest "fireworks" shows I have ever seen...

September 2, 2014
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