Keeping Sanctified in the Backcountry

2:23 p.m. on March 12, 2009 (EDT)
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Just wondering how some folks keep clean while out in the forest, either hiking a trail or doing some primitive camping. Afterall, no one likes to stink to high heaven that I know of.

As for myself, I did purchase a Coleman solar shower. Never got to put it to use as of yet. The weather turned cold again here in southeast Ohio.

In addition to all this, I also purchased some of those wipes from the local Aldi's here in Vienna West Virginia. Don't need any water with those things.

So how do you keep clean? This is what I mean by the word sanctified.

3:45 p.m. on March 12, 2009 (EDT)
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I normally use the the biodegrade camping wipes Then I ether burn them or carry them out. I like the better than wet-ones or handy-wipes because the soap isn't as hard to get off. You can rinse out your socks, skives & t-shirts in a stream or creak and you can go for a swim too.

4:28 p.m. on March 12, 2009 (EDT)
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I did that before. Cleaned up in Mill Run, while backpacking in the Quebec Run Wild Area in southwest Pennsylvania. Boy, did I feel good afterwards!

I do like to keep clean, even in the forest.

Thanks.

4:35 p.m. on March 12, 2009 (EDT)
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I keep a bandana tucked through a pack strap or one of my belt hangers on my pants. After a while you just can't live without it! You can wash your hands or your face at a convenient creek in a second, or use the bandana to wipe sweat (that's why i like it high on a pack strap) and it dries in a few minutes.

Just pick a bright color.

5:01 p.m. on March 12, 2009 (EDT)
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Just can't go without a bandana Franc. Perfect for wiping away sweat which for me usually means I can tolerate my own stink a few hours or maybe a day longer. I have a black one though and didn't really think to get a bright one. Thanks for the tip.

As for overall clenliness, I usually just swim (ocean, stream, even creek) at the very least it gets the caked on dirt and sweat off and on a warmer day, is a great way to relax.

7:43 p.m. on March 12, 2009 (EDT)
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When I was young I used to just forgo bathing outside of washing my face,hands and legs (if they were exposed by shorts) while in the backcountry for many weeks. Now as an older,wiser hiker I tend to do a full body wash about every other day when water is closeby. I either bath by swimming in warmer months or by filling all my water bottles taking them back away from the water source and rinse washing without soap. Like in the shower at home I never use soap on anything but my head,armpits and crotch and back sometimes. I have not used soap on anything else since I was about 21 and living indoors year round. I don't like how dry my skin feels with soap. Sometimes I do use shampoo for my skin.

9:52 p.m. on March 12, 2009 (EDT)
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If there is water I'll try to clean up every day. Lakes or pools in creeks mean a swim. If not enough for a swim I'll do like Gary and carry a water bottle or two and rinse, no soap.

And likewise with clothing, I like to rinse shorts, t-shirt, and socks daily; at a minimum anytime there is sufficient water.

11:38 p.m. on March 12, 2009 (EDT)
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I hope you folks realize that bathing and washing in streams and lakes violates Leave No Trace principles. Especially if you use soap/shampoo/other cleaning products. At least take your wash water 100 feet from the water source. Remember that even if you and your party do not drink that water, other people and the animals will.

6:29 a.m. on March 13, 2009 (EDT)
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I carry a bandana also, as well as one of those quick drying synthetic yellow towels. I cut the towel in half, one half for bathing and the other for kitchen use.

I take some bio-soap & hand sanitizer as well, sanitizer has a lot of uses in the back-country, sanitation and sterilization being primary of course, but it will also serve as a fire starter. I prefer the unscented type for backpacking.

As mentioned, plain water ( no soap) will get most odor / dirt off of your body just fine. This should be done away from water ( 100' ) sources and the waste water ( gray water ), including the water used for kitchen cleaning should be broadcast over a wide area not just dumped in one spot.

I do go for a dip occasionally in larger streams / blue holes / plunge pools and this can be very refreshing. It is important to note that it is possible to absorb bacteria / protozoa etc. through sores / cuts / scrapes in your skin while in the water, just as is true of drinking untreated water from the same stream.

Hygiene is very important to our well being in the back-country, studies have shown that a large portion of illness in the back-country could be avoided by simple hand sanitation.

I would dare say that leaving a strong odor trail is not very LNT where animals incredible sense of smell is concerned, of course that is always a matter of degree, and entirely my own opinion as LNT does not broach that subject to the best of my knowledge.

11:29 a.m. on March 13, 2009 (EDT)
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Gary Palmer,

At home I never use soap. Like you, I discovered that soap dries the skin. Now I just use shampoo. Since I work at a State Park and part of my duties is to clean the bath houses, I always find nearly full bottles of shampoo someone just leaves. I never suffer good things like that to go to waste. I reuse the same and save on the cost of buying the same!

I think, in my humble opinion, that shampoo cleans the body much better than soap without that horrible dry skin effect.

11:36 a.m. on March 13, 2009 (EDT)
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Trouthunter,

Regarding your statement concerning taking dips in streams and pools I never hesitate to enjoy all such accomodations nature provideth, such as streams, pools and even waterfalls.

I enjoy water-it's very refreshing and it doth refresh the spirit. Nothing like a little water to rekindle the soul while out on the trail.

Btw, Mill Run is great! Plenty deep for nearly a swim!

3:07 p.m. on March 13, 2009 (EDT)
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When I backpack, right before I go to bed I like to wash my face. I started bringing this soap.

 

I just dig a pit pretty far away from water, trees, and campsites, heat up some water with my stove, and wash. Super easy, still sticks with the LNT rules, and I just put the dirt back in the pit when I'm done.

 

I bring an MSR packtowel too, I really like it.

3:29 p.m. on March 13, 2009 (EDT)
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Where does one purchase this soap if I may ask?

I have been using that Stearns Sun Shower Camp Soap myself.

4:03 p.m. on March 13, 2009 (EDT)
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If the weather is right, I might take a dip in a lake.

4:19 p.m. on March 13, 2009 (EDT)
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Buy Mike Clelland's book, and do it the way his cartoons show to do it, with a water bottle.

8:01 p.m. on March 13, 2009 (EDT)
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I use unscented baby wipes a lot and pack them out, especially in the winter when washing is a quick deal. I must admit that underarm body odour is not one of my favorite smells, it is bad when you can't stand the smell of yourself. I received one of those collapsible buckets for xmas and can't wait to try it out. I can fill it and take it away from the lake to have a nice wash or clean a piece of clothing, with of course only natural, unscented, biodegradable soap. I use a natural product from Soap Works which is a biodegradable glycerine (all vegetable) body wash. It is safe for body, hair and great for shaving, it also comes in the bar form. It is not drying at all. I have used it for dishes as well. Check out www.puresoapworks.com

12:47 a.m. on March 14, 2009 (EDT)
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Wilderness Gal,

Thanks for that link.

10:02 a.m. on March 14, 2009 (EDT)
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No problem. I save loads of cash with this product, it is very versatile, safe and environmentally friendly!

11:03 a.m. on March 14, 2009 (EDT)
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I used to know a guy in Yosemite that even in the middle of the winter up at Tenaya lake, would chop a hole in the ice on the lake and get in an wash with sand from the lake. Polar bear club!

5:01 p.m. on March 14, 2009 (EDT)
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Where does one purchase this soap if I may ask?

I have been using that Stearns Sun Shower Camp Soap myself.

REI, Mountaingear, any outdoor store will usually carry it. I think Coleman makes something similar too.

11:15 a.m. on March 15, 2009 (EDT)
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Well, sanctified means "separated from" or "set apart", both of which are likely to occur if you avoid bathing entirely when on a long trip with others.

LNT has merit, but it also may be excessive in some regards. Yes, when I swim and wash in a lake using bio-degradable soap, there are a few bubbles for a time, but if I do it often enough, I don't cause massive oil-slicks on the beaches. And if we are going to worry about some palm oil polluting a pristine pond, we should consider that fish defecate in that water (eeeew!). I'll do my part but I draw the line at putting Pampers on panfish.

I always carry a large red bandana. This has a million uses - soaked with water and worn as a headband, it cools the head on hot days; good for picking up hot pots; keep it wet around your neck and wipe the face occasionally; cleaning excess Mucilin from silk fly lines; always ready as a tourniquet; used as a towel; used as a washcloth; etc.

1:40 p.m. on March 15, 2009 (EDT)
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Thank You for the info. I'll have to try that soap once mine runs low.

I think Campmor now carries the same. http://www.campmor.com/outdoor/gear/Product___84841

1:50 p.m. on March 15, 2009 (EDT)
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Well, sanctified means "separated from" or "set apart", both of which are likely to occur if you avoid bathing entirely when on a long trip with others.

LNT has merit, but it also may be excessive in some regards. Yes, when I swim and wash in a lake using bio-degradable soap, there are a few bubbles for a time, but if I do it often enough, I don't cause massive oil-slicks on the beaches. And if we are going to worry about some palm oil polluting a pristine pond, we should consider that fish defecate in that water (eeeew!). I'll do my part but I draw the line at putting Pampers on panfish.

You are the first person to know what the word sanctified means. I got a good laugh out of your first statement because I know how true it is!

I do agree with your second comment I must admit. Common sense should always be the rule. If some applied the LNT to it's literal conclusion, no one would dare to hike or set up camp for fear that they are somehow "scaring" the earth or something. The outdoors was created to be enjoyed by men. Not abused but enjoyed and explored, in my opinion, with all due respect it deserveth.

9:14 p.m. on March 15, 2009 (EDT)
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ministercreek,

HaHa, yes... he is the first person to post the definition in this thread, but you may have offendeth many people who do know what it meaneth. I know what you meant but that was funny.

1:33 p.m. on March 16, 2009 (EDT)
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ministercreek,

HaHa, yes... he is the first person to post the definition in this thread, but you may have offendeth many people who do know what it meaneth. I know what you meant but that was funny.

Yes by the word sanctified I'm referring to hygeine, cleanliness.

The word sanctified is used alot in the Book of Leviticus I do realize. That Book does have alot to say about good hygeine, something I totally agree with.

Afterall, I do wash oft. I refuse to stink.

3:48 p.m. on March 28, 2009 (EDT)
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I have been using my new Coleman Solar Shower here in the Wayne National Forest. Thing is really great. The water takes about three hours in the sun to get about 120 degrees.

I hang it from a tree branch high enough so I can get the *perfect* shower here in the forest. Couldn't be happier to be so clean!

10:21 p.m. on March 28, 2009 (EDT)
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Why are you buying a Coleman Solar Shower? It is easy to make one. The inner bag is just the 2.5 gallon liner bag for the boxes of wine and apple juice, with a cloth hanging bag plus a nozzle you can pick up at any drug store. These things have been around for years with real backpackers buying the wine (Franzia Brothers preferably, at $4 for the 2 gallon box), thus making the bag essentially free, then a buck for the nozzle. Talk about your BIG Name ripoffs! Coleman, a HUGE camping gear name (seller of THE MOST POPULAR camping tent for Boy and Girl Scouts, and a part of the HUGE conglomerate Johnson Outdoors, which also makes the MUST-HAVE Old Town Canoes and sells the MOST POPULAR MUST-HAVE compass in North America, Silva (actually made by Suunto of Finland, one of the two MUST-HAVE names in compasses in the world, and not by Silva of Sweden, the other MUST-HAVE compass name).

10:33 p.m. on March 28, 2009 (EDT)
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Bill, you stole my thunder! Oh well, yes the bags from boxes of wine are quite re-usable for showers and water containers as well. I have one in my dogs pack right now. Empty of course.

10:30 a.m. on March 29, 2009 (EDT)
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Keeping clean in the woods is fairly easy but a point needs to be made about long winter trips: plan to stay dirty! All my recent backpacking trips have been in the 10-12 day range and the last several have been in zero or below zero temps. There's no bathing of any kind done, period. I may run a wet paper towel over my face once in a while, but that's it.

There are ways to keep clean in the winter but it requires either an open fire or a woodstove, and a large 3-4 gallon metal container to heat up water. No backpacker is gonna carry such a large pot.

One thing I find helpful when the temps aren't too low(like around 25-35), is to pull out my cooking pot by a creek, brush my hair over my head and wash out my hair and scalp/face with cold creek water. Then I suds up using Bronners or Camp Suds and rinse off away from the creek. It's amazing how this simple act will make me feel about 10 years younger.

The rest of the time and in the 3 seasons, well, I just jump in the creeks or lakes and have at it. One observation: when I was in my 20s and 30s, I could jump in a cold creek even in the winter and laugh about it, now as I get older it's almost impossible. Wonder why?

Oops! I forgot one tried and true winter bathing technique that requires a few extra tarps/ground cloths or taken-down tents: the sweat lodge. Heat up a dozen or so rocks in a large firepit, build a small framed shelter using dead branches and logs(I once used dental floss to tie it together), cover with the tent or tarps, put the hot rocks in the center(preferably in a dug pit), crawl inside and pour water over the rocks. Instant sweat bath--if you get it hot enough, you can stumble outside and immediately jump into a creek, even in the winter, and then return to the lodge. The cleanest I've ever been was after a sweat.

1:01 p.m. on March 29, 2009 (EDT)
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Tipi -

Sweat baths! Excellent suggestion (and I would have expected this from someone named "Tipi"!).

2:04 p.m. on March 29, 2009 (EDT)
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Why are you buying a Coleman SunShower? It is easy to make one. The inner bag is just the 2.5 gallon liner bag for the boxes of wine and apple juice, with a cloth hanging bag plus a nozzle you can pick up at any drug store. These things have been around for years with real backpackers buying the wine (Franzia Brothers preferably, at $4 for the 2 gallon box), thus making the bag essentially free, then a buck for the nozzle. Talk about your BIG Name ripoffs! Coleman, a HUGE camping gear name (seller of THE MOST POPULAR camping tent for Boy and Girl Scouts, and a part of the HUGE conglomerate Johnson Outdoors, which also makes the MUST-HAVE Old Town Canoes and sells the MOST POPULAR MUST-HAVE compass in North America, Silva (actually made by Suunto of Finland, one of the two MUST-HAVE names in compasses in the world, and not by Silva of Sweden, the other MUST-HAVE compass name).

LOL!!!

Other than the rant about Coleman being some alleged BIG name brand (which no one would even think to say that, namely Bob Collins, aka "BIG Name Bob"), I hardly feel I was "ripped off". I got a great buy on a great product. http://www.campingcomfortably.com/coleman-5-gallon-camp-shower.html Plus I got to patronize a great outdoor company. I believe in patronizing small business.

I simply love my Coleman brand Solar Shower (not SunShower, which is the Stearn's product btw). http://www.cabelas.com/prod-1/0038016517266a.shtml

Since I don't drink the suggestion you referred to would not be an option for me. I prefer to live my life sober.

Thanks though. :)

7:30 p.m. on March 29, 2009 (EDT)
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ministercreek,

If you want a couple of the liners from Franzia, I will send you some for free. No consumtion needed.

I am one of those guys that buy Mountain Hardwear, Marmot, Patagonia, etc. But I am also very frugal in other areas, I shop at thrift stores, buy used gear from friends that HAVE to trade up all the time, and even make some of my gear.

You seem to be spending a good bit of time looking up your nose at us guys with big name gear and I don't think it is fair. LOL

10:13 a.m. on March 30, 2009 (EDT)
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ministercreek,

I am one of those guys that buy Mountain Hardwear, Marmot, Patagonia, etc. But I am also very frugal in other areas, I shop at thrift stores, buy used gear from friends that HAVE to trade up all the time, and even make some of my gear.

You seem to be spending a good bit of time looking up your nose at us guys with big name gear and I don't think it is fair. LOL

I for one never buy gear from the brands that you mentioned in the beginning of your post. Better deals are to be had that perform just as good if not better. Nothing personal.

Personally I don't care what people use or buy. I simply offer my opinions here on this most excellent Site. Afterall, this is what Trailspace.com is all about. I do realize I take a different approach to backpacking than most and gear selection. Doesn't mean I hate people. I think I'm just questioning the idea of using BIG name brands solely for the "image" they project.

Allow me to illistrate the point: My friend Scott once needed a sleeping bag. I told him about Campmor (this was back in the early '90's mind you). I shewed him some Coleman Peak 1 bags. He was the type of person who had to "have it now". So he went to Appalachian Outfitters (which was then located in Akron Ohio). Needless to say, the salesperson who approached my friend started telling him how "cool" Sierra Designs brand bags were and that "everyone uses them, they are so cool".

To make a long story short, my friend ended up purchasing that bag. However he was not satisfied with his Sierra Designs bag. After a week or so he decided to return it for a refund. He asked if I would come with him, since I know how to talk to salespeople. The employee who sold Scott the bag was "wondering" why he did not like the bag and was attempting to talk my friend out of returning the thing. He kept saying "this bag is so cool, it was highly recommended on Backpacker Magazine." Go figure. Finally I stepped up to the plate and simply told the person he "simply wants his money back, which he most reluctenly refunded.

Finally my friend learned his lesson well-not to purchase BIG Name brand sleeping bags (and other gear for that matter). He got home and straightway placed the order with Campmor for the Peak 1 Grey Fox Mummy Bag. He was quite satisfied with the Coleman bag over the Sierra Designs bag and paid less than half the cost over the BIG name bag.

What am I saying here? Am I "sticking my nose up at people"? No, I'm shewing that one dosen't need BIG name brand gear to be a real hiker/ backpacker and camper. I'm opposing an idea, not any person, you or anyone else. Actally I like you Mr.Trouthunter. :)

Hope it helps. :)

12:08 p.m. on March 30, 2009 (EDT)
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....
Since I don't drink the suggestion you referred to would not be an option for me. I prefer to live my life sober.

MC,

As I noted, a wide variety of beverages come in the boxes with the plastic liners. Most of mine come from apple juice boxes. Some come from other kinds and flavors of fruit juices. Open your eyes the next time you go into a grocery store. There are lots of ways to get gear that works without buying anything with a brand name on it. It is very easy to make your own and to improvise. By far the best windshell I own was made for me by a friend who was the wife of a long-time climbing partner - much better design and structure than anything on the market today. Same with one of my favorite tents (long-since worn out), far better than any tent you have mentioned. Just get the materials, some scissors, a bit of thread, and needles, and sew it yourself, or get a skilled friend to help you. That way, you get what you really need and want, and avoid all those money-grubbers who are just in business to make a buck, including supposedly "small-name" shops that are actually subsidiaries of really huge conglomerates (do you really know who owns those names you tout so highly? You might be unpleasantly surprised.)

12:10 p.m. on March 30, 2009 (EDT)
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I use unscented baby wipes in the winter for having a quick wash and find them great! Keep a few in a ziplock stuffed in a pocket next to your body because they will freeze and then have a warm wash whenever!

12:22 p.m. on March 30, 2009 (EDT)
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Oh, for the love of Pete. Let's kill this thread. (With all due respect to Wilderness Gal, who actually tried to provide a useful bit.)

1:13 p.m. on March 30, 2009 (EDT)
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The topic of this thread is keeping clean in the backcountry. Thanks to everyone who has provided many suggestions on how to do so.

Let's keep on this topic or move on.

I've edited out some mentions above that border on personal attacks. Everyone's entitled to their own opinion on how to best keep clean and what products they prefer to do so, but this is forum is not for bashing others over and over or their personal preferences.

FYI, Trailspace's community guidelines are here: http://www.trailspace.com/about/community-rules.html

1:20 p.m. on March 30, 2009 (EDT)
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MC,

...avoid all those money-grubbers who are just in business to make a buck, including supposedly "small-name" shops that are actually subsidiaries of really huge conglomerates (do you really know who owns those names you tout so highly? You might be unpleasantly surprised.)

Bill,

I'm not afraid to spend money for good gear. That is not even an issue with me.

To get this thread "back on track", I know I purchased a very good product when I ordered my Solar Shower. I use this item every night I get back to camp. Works as claimed.

As a side-note, I have nothing against anyone on these forums, including you. Just have a different perpective is all. I'm sure not many people feel the way I do when it comes to gear.

2:47 p.m. on March 30, 2009 (EDT)
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Adventure Medical Kits distributes a line of washcloth-sized and handtowel sized wipes that work quite well. I have used these on trips to Antarctica, where they stayed soft enough to use for an occasional wipe-down of your whole body. They do not appear to leave a scent that might attract animals looking for food. Purell and similar liquid hand sanitizers work well, and also leave no scent once they evaporate - hand sanitation is very important in the backcountry to staying healthy.

4:30 p.m. on March 30, 2009 (EDT)
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We have discussed cleaning with liquids, but sometimes liquids are in short supply. In dry places, just keeping one's hair and body from feeling generally icky (scientific term) from hair oils and body oils is actually quite easy. A dust bath! This may mean some baby talc (unscented) for "washing" hair and body. OTOH, fine dust may be available all around you.

Don't spend lots of money, IMO, on dry shampoos; there are lots of cheap substitutes. Also, many people won't need deodorant if they cut out meat for the trip. The odor of carnivores is much stronger than herbivores for a good reason (distant early warning system). If you want a cheap, unscented deodorant, bring along a small rock of alum.

7:01 p.m. on March 30, 2009 (EDT)
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Who knew keeping clean could be so much fun? My offer for the liner bags still stands if it will help anyone stay clean, or improve their sense of humor.

Keeping clean is not something I obsess over during colder months as long as I can keep my face and hands clean, but in warmer months I start getting a little pickier, between sweat, deet, and dirt I start getting cranky after a few days. So I bath and it's good for everyone.

7:13 p.m. on March 30, 2009 (EDT)
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During those colder months I take "sponge" baths in public restrooms.

I love being clean.

In the morning I shave and wash my face at the Parkersburg Library.

5:56 a.m. on April 8, 2009 (EDT)
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From a woman's point of view, water is a good thing in the back country. It starts with the collapsible bucket used to bring water from the stream to the cooking area where I filter it for cooking and for the next day. A few gallons will be left for personal cleanup after the meal. I use a squirt bottle for bathroom hygiene throughout the day (no tissues are needed), then just use a dab of Dr. Bronner's for the after dinner cleanup. I carry at least 1 ounce of alcohol per day to "treat" the underarms before dressing for bed. It's better than a deodorant for killing the germs that cause the stinkies. The alcohol and Dr. Bronner's goes back into the backpack with food, stove, and other smell-goods, to be bear bagged as high as possible. I wear clean night clothes that can double as liners on the trip, and slip into a silk sleeping bag liner to keep my main sleeping bag clean and fresh. It just feels nice to go to sleep clean and comfortable.

Three main points: Wash and cook at least 50 yards from the water source and your sleeping camp, and use Dr. Bronner's, an all natural castille soap that is easily available. You only need a dab to remove body oils and dirt. Then use a bit of alcohol on the end of a bandanda applied to the face, hands, and underarms (in that order) to kill the germs that cause body odor and infection. You'll be squeaky clean.

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