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work together to live in the backcountry

2:21 p.m. on August 24, 2009 (EDT)
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i am also planing on trying to go out and live off the land but there are manny risks of going out alone. what if i get sick or injerd it would be very possibly die out there. but if we worked as a group we could help out each other if they get sick or hurt.we could make a cammunity like the natives did for 100s of years. the avrage time and a native had to work( hunting, gathering, skinning ...) was only about 4 to 5 hours a day. that was 1000 years ago we have modern technology to make everything we need much easyer to get. we can build enrgey devices with water, wind or solar ,most likely and with that we could than use and build anything we need to suvive much better than how we are now.

4:21 p.m. on August 24, 2009 (EDT)
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Actually some indians were still hunter/gatherers as recently as 100 years ago in some parts of the USA.

I only work about 3-4 months a year, going on 33 years now to make enough to live on outdoors the rest of the year. Sure a hunter/gatherer life style would be okay, but I am not so much a hunter as I eat little meat when outdoors. I can carry cheap easy to prepare meals for about $150 a month or $1500 during the average 9 month period when I am not working. I usually spend way more money living in town during the 3 months I work tahn during the rest on rent, utilities and fuel.

The hippies of the 60's did what you are talking about, making a community that worked together to make a small village or commune. And there are many cultures around the world that still live this way, even fairly modern people like the Gypsies of Europe.

5:37 p.m. on August 24, 2009 (EDT)
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...the avrage time and a native had to work( hunting, gathering, skinning ...) was only about 4 to 5 hours a day.

It was always my understanding that the native people worked ALL day every day. making shelter, clothes, gathering food, planting food, hunting, fishing, caring for family, and preparing for the next season. When one lives off the land, one becomes like the animals and animals do nothing but look for their next meal and, when the season is right, breed. Taking a mate? ;-)

8:56 p.m. on August 24, 2009 (EDT)
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I am going to agree with f klock, many people who live / lived off the land work very hard, long hours. That was the motivation to invent machines, systems, and methods to make the work easier.

We now have a much easier way of life in modern society, generally speaking, each person spends their time working in a particular profession and becomes very proficient at their task(s).

This efficiency reduces the amount of time they must work each day.

This is not to say that I am against other lifestyles, but those who do not work and contribute to modern society (those who want to live in a way that lets them escape work) get to enjoy the privileges of that society, for example, roads, hospitals, law enforcement, water & sewer, etc.

Most commune type societies I have been exposed to, or read about, are not efficient enough to be truly self reliant, they are subsidised by the hard work, infrastructure, and tax dollars of the larger society they are trying to escape.

9:31 p.m. on August 24, 2009 (EDT)
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A true hunter/gatherer society could permit more leisure only if the area was particularly rich in food and tropical or sub-tropical in climate. Add drought, cold, or any other weather vagaries and life gets hard.

Nomadic herding people can occasionally have times of ease, but it is not a constant.

And once anyone wants anything that he/she cannot produce himself, the slide into long hours begins. If you are not content with your bone or stone knife and long for a good steel implement, you need to start gathering goods in excess of your immediate needs in order to trade. Then you need to protect your new knife from those who might take it away... in short, you re-enter civilization.

Trout, look at the Hutterites of Manitoba and the Dakotas as an example of efficient communal living without burdening others.

9:47 p.m. on August 24, 2009 (EDT)
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Yes overmywaders, I'm not saying it is not possible. I'm saying it is not possible by those who are drawn to it in an effort to live an easy life. It requires a lot of work. Those who make it work effectively have my respect

12:44 a.m. on August 25, 2009 (EDT)
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I currently work only two hours a day, five to six days a week to pay all my rent and grocery bills.

But I have chosen a cheap poverty level existence all of my adult years. I could easily live this way the rest of my life. I have much more free time to do what I want to do.

It took me about 5 years out of high school to decide and choose to live this way.

1:33 p.m. on August 25, 2009 (EDT)
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i dont beleave we have a easyer life in modern society. i feel are goverment is not spending are taxs for the average person. all my life my biggest intrenst was always scince in paticular technology and throughtout my life i have see many new devices that could prouduce every thing we need at such abundance that it wold be free or almost free. ( higher demand=lower supply=greater cost, highter supply=lower demand= lower cost). these tecnolagies include dozens of renewable energy generating machines most are very relable and can be operated at very low cost. the main technolagy is a new way of growing food called multi-story hydroponic farms could be build in a city with a footprint of one acer but 10 storys hight, thats 10 time more groing area plus no pest, no disease, faster growing time and year round growing. that last main thing is factory made modular homes thay are just as nice as a framed house exeped that can be build in a fraction of the time and half the cost and if energy is almost free, even cheper. our government is wasting are money on war, oil and cheep usless produces. thats why i say lests do it are selfs

10:45 p.m. on August 25, 2009 (EDT)
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Two points real quick:

that last main thing is factory made modular homes thay are just as nice as a framed house exeped that can be build in a fraction of the time and half the cost

I have been a carpenter for twenty plus years, I have worked on many different types of structures and building methods. Everything from small starter homes to multi million dollar beach homes. It is a total myth that modular homes are built better than conventional homes. Modular homes are built in box sections and are stacked into place on the jobsite like a childs toy blocks. They are strapped together with steel straps, the structure of modular homes is fractured at best not integrated like the structures of site built homes. I wouldn't have a modular if you gave it to me.

We have a saying in construction, "You can have any two of the following, fast, cheap, or good. But never all three!"

Modular housing is fast and cheap, It is definitely not good.

Second point, more like a question really.

our government is wasting are money on war, oil and cheep usless produces. thats why i say lests do it are selfs

Are you suggesting sedition? HaHa

12:24 a.m. on August 28, 2009 (EDT)
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"This is not to say that I am against other lifestyles, but those who do not work and contribute to modern society (those who want to live in a way that lets them escape work) get to enjoy the privileges of that society, for example, roads, hospitals, law enforcement, water & sewer, etc."

But who is to say who pays his share? If I make 50 grand a year, drive a truck on the roads, live full time in a town and make use of its resources, does that compare to someone who lives a minimal existance, rides a bicycle, uses few public sewer and water services, but still pays taxes on the few hours they work?

I can see this logic if applied to people who live on handouts, but not on a person who works little and uses little.

6:37 p.m. on August 28, 2009 (EDT)
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I can see this logic if applied to people who live on handouts, but not on a person who works little and uses little.

Well, I do see your view point trebek, but if you look at the larger picture, those who do not contribute in some way are living on handouts in some form or fashion. By contribution I also include things like volunteer work & working for low wages.

I think that paying your share is more of an attitude, than something that needs to be measured. There are people who don't have a lot, but do volunteer work of some kind, that contributes an awful lot in my mind.

Even if you live in the woods and eat berries, you still benefit from a lot of things people seem to forget about.

A couple that come to mind quickly are:

Modern medicine that was advanced through a lot of hard work & surely not by people who just wanted to sit and play drums all day. Even if the only care you ever receive is free care at the emergency room, you have benefited from the hard work of others.

National defense is another thing that anyone who lives in a free country relies on to stay free. Without a free country to live in you can not necessarily expect to live a carefree life of hiking through the wilderness. Go try that in Somalia, Columbia, Venezuela, or a host of other countries that are lawless or else simply do not care about personal liberties. Smart people do not wander around in the wilderness in a lot of countries.

But I really am not bothered by someone, or a group, who wants to live cheaply, and live a life as an adventurer, or just live off the land. It is only the ones that arrogantly feel as if they owe society nothing, for whatever reason, that get my goat.

You know what I mean?

April 20, 2014
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