PBS webpage for the six episode on the Nat Parks

2:01 a.m. on September 28, 2009 (EDT)
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Here at pbs.org is the main page to see clips,deleted scenes and future full episodes of the National Parks programs. Starting the 28th the first episode will be available to watch in its full program.

http://www.pbs.org/nationalparks/

8:09 a.m. on September 28, 2009 (EDT)
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thanks for posting. loved the first episode last night (sunday). john muir has long been a hero of mine, and i loved to see so much of the program devoted to telling his story. really looking forward to the rest of these.

9:38 a.m. on September 28, 2009 (EDT)
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There are many long clips from the programs there at the website, I watched many of them last night. There was one that stood out. It was called "How Yosemite got its Name" Says the first man to describe the valley seen for the first time by men on horseback searching for indians, came across the Inspiration Point overlook and saw the canyon of Yosemite Valley. He said that thinking the indians called themselves the Yo-Sem-ites the proper name should be Yosemite. But the indians living there later said they were called the Ahwannee (not sure of spelling) and that Yosemite was a indian word meaning "they are killers" or anyone who was not to be trusted.

I too have always admired John Muir. I read his books about Yosemite and the Sierra, and of his travels in Alaska and around South America from Boston to San Francisco back before the Panama Canal, when ships going to California had to go down and around the southern end of S.A. which was as long as a six month journey.

Like Di Vinci and Frank Lloyd Wright before and after Muir, he had drawings of a bed that would lift him up in the morning and a cabin built over the Merced so that he could hear the soothing waters all night.

And about when Hetch Hetchy Valley, which was a twin sister to Yosemite Valley was to be dammed and how Muir fought to save it, just before he died in 1913 (the year my father was born).

There are glaciers in southeastern Alaska Muir walked on where are now open valleys, where the tons of ice were when he was there and 30 miles longer than today.

Go to the mountains and get thier good tidings, your cares will fall away like Autumn leaves... said Muir.

2:14 p.m. on September 28, 2009 (EDT)
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I enjoyed watching the first episode too and learning about how the first parks came into existence. I'm sorry to say I have yet to visit Yellowstone or Yosemite, a huge gap in my existence, but one I'll remedy someday.

Muir was excellent. I can imagine him being quite a character in person, but a brilliant, inspired, and inspiring one. I hope that if I'd met him, I would have recognized the genius in him, and not just the character factor. I think his wife deserves credit for her support too.

The parts about the government driving the Native Americans off their own land was sad. I liked when the native park ranger made the point about white men not discovering the land. It was never lost.

Sometimes it seems like the more men (and women) get involved, the more potential we have to mess things up in nature, like the greedy, exploitative types in the parks. Yet, we also have the potential, like Muir, to have really amazing things result when we appreciate nature for nature's sake.

If you didn't watch last night, I recommend watching the episode online.

December 21, 2014
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