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Reasons to join Leave No Trace

5:46 p.m. on November 18, 2009 (EST)
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5,181 forum posts

I was just in the process of renewing my Leave No Trace membership, and got to wondering what all the benefits are, aside from supporting the organization and its educational and outreach activities.

1. Training activities - I am a Leave No Trace Trainer, as are some other Trailspace participants. As a member, I get the materials at a discount (they are inexpensive anyway, though if you need a large number for a class, there are shipping charges).

2. Great T-shirts every year! Well, you could take the water bottle, I suppose.

3. discounts on PackIt Gourmet backpacking meals (top quality food for the backcountry)

4. up to $3500 discount on your purchase of a new Subaru (excellent vehicle to get to and from the trailhead - I have had mine for 6 years and over 100,000 miles, and Young Son has had his for 9 years, both of us having used them in deep snow and on 4WD roads - plus they are one of the few cars that got the highest safety awards for the 2010 models).

5. Pro deal prices on Coleman gear (that's less than wholesale dealer cost!)

and other benefits and deals that come up from time to time, like discount subscriptions to several outdoor magazines.

But mainly, as active outdoor folks, we do need to support the concept of Leave No Trace, as has been discussed many times here, and supporting the LNT organization through membership is a good way to do this.

I always add a few bucks to my basic membership fee, as well.

11:20 p.m. on November 18, 2009 (EST)
37 reviewer rep
747 forum posts

Bill S,

Yeah I'm a rebel but I call LNT Leave no trash. I build smooth tent spots so that others will use the same spot and not have to build another one. I consider some improvements in well used areas to be more ecologically sound than LNT. Besides I live in Oregon and we burn Habitat to warm our homes. I can light a fire just about any place I want and its completely legal. I respect the wilderness and would never leave trash, but warming fires with say half a cord of wood are not unheard of and on the side of a volcanoe - so what?

Jim S

8:51 a.m. on November 28, 2009 (EST)
47 reviewer rep
64 forum posts

Not slamming your efforts, but I think LNT education is aimed at the wrong area of society. You know you are close to a road when the amount of trash increases.

LNT? I would rather FNT. Find no trace. I must admit that I am on the downs about trash right now. For years. I would stop at a wrapper, bottle, beer can, or other dropped trash; say a little swear to the one who dropped it, then carry it for a while and eventually stop and put it in my hanging trash bag on the rear of my pack. I thought it was a good, nice thing to do. Eventually I grew tired of this activity. And of burning this stuff - I can't carry mine and everyone elses- so I built small trash fires and melted all this trash into a flume of toxic smoke to remain as pollution of another sort. If you can't see it, its not trash, right? I pass by trash now, sadly. And my main concern is that folks I meet on the trail ahead will not think it was me who dropped it.

Two weeks ago I stayed at a beautiful, and popular gap. After I packed up and was ready to hit the trail I did a circular walk down both sides of the gap to a distance that would be equal to the flight of a 12 ounce bottle thrown in a drunken stupor. It took 14 trips with as much as I could carry back from each foray. I made a huge pile of bottles, cans, wrappers, plastic things, vienna sausage cans, ect...This pile I had to leave - I was going up and over the next ridge.

So, as to LNT, there is some doubt in my mind that those seeking this type education will make much of a dent in the reality of land use. With that said, I would consider it a battle of futility to re-fluff the leaves I slept on the night before, only to walk past the trash that lay ahead.

Ban glass in the wilderness and I will contribute money to that cause. Broken glass cuts bare feet - like the feet of wild aminals and hiking dogs.

April 17, 2014
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