Additional reasons I have discovered to camp 100 yrds. away from a stream.

10:30 p.m. on January 1, 2010 (EST)
MODERATOR REVIEW CORPS
998 reviewer rep
3,481 forum posts

Hey all,

Sometimes when I go camping, I like to just sit and think. My last trip was no different, right after Christmas I spent some time in a river gorge in TN.

While sitting on some rocks, and thinking about it a for a while, I realized there are several reasons I don't camp right beside streams anymore. Not just LNT Principles, or Park rules, but some reasons of my own.

1. Everything you have is prone to get damp after a few days.

2. Wet clothes dry out slower.

3. Dry wood for kindling is harder to find / longer distance away.

4. Raccoon invasions are worse close to the water it seems. I think they walk the stream looking for food. Maybe it has more to do with wind direction, I'm not sure.

5. Hopefully better shelter in the trees from the wind during winter.


I see lots of campsites on stream banks, and while sleeping beside one is cool, after a few days it can be problematic. I also think it is good to keep the stream corridor pristine, the less impact it has from camping the better for us all I think. I have seen two areas beside streams shut down due to deforestation this year.


Just my Camping Zen thought of the day, for what it's worth.


What's yours?

7:46 p.m. on January 2, 2010 (EST)
63 reviewer rep
190 forum posts

Years ago, I thought the best spot was next to the creek/stream. As long as I was above any flash flood potential I would be ok. After learning some NLT principals I thought it be best to stay away from the creeks. While camping in Eastatoe Creek HP, I was suprised to find only two fire rings of the 5 or 6 outside of 100' from the creek. Man was that place wet! I started a fire the first night, but that was it for me. You're right Trout, lots of hungry fish there, but boy was it damp.

12:19 a.m. on January 3, 2010 (EST)
MODERATOR REVIEW CORPS
998 reviewer rep
3,481 forum posts

Years ago, I thought the best spot was next to the creek/stream. As long as I was above any flash flood potential I would be ok. After learning some NLT principals I thought it be best to stay away from the creeks. While camping in Eastatoe Creek HP, I was suprised to find only two fire rings of the 5 or 6 outside of 100' from the creek. Man was that place wet! I started a fire the first night, but that was it for me. You're right Trout, lots of hungry fish there, but boy was it damp.

Hey...I'm glad you got to go.

So, how was it?

2:09 a.m. on January 3, 2010 (EST)
1,631 reviewer rep
3,962 forum posts

Raccoons are some ornery lil critters aren't they? There are streams in alot of the places I go. Raccoons love crayfish. They are the primary reason I stay away from streams(at least some distance.) I as well as a few friends have had these lil guys tear our coolers up on a hunting trip(they figured out how to open them) tore up a friends TNF tent for half a trail bar he forgot inside(not smart but it happened.). They are considered a nuisance animal in some states. Very smart. And can be very mean. I stay away from them. Alot of times at night when I am in my tent I can hear them chattering... I personally think they are laughing at me. j/k- I haven't lost my marbles yet. Notice I said yet.

You are right about the starter wood and what not. When I was a newbie and did the stream thing I would find myself venturing away from the stream to find something that would take a spark. I now carry fatwood and dryer lint with me in my lil kit I devised. I do like to keep things the way they are. Its nice to leave the next generation something to enjoy.

9:33 p.m. on January 3, 2010 (EST)
63 reviewer rep
190 forum posts


Hey...I'm glad you got to go.

So, how was it?


Great time, & cold! I ended up hiking in from the Foothills trail parking lot. It was a lot shorter hike than I anticipated. Fish were biting before the jig hit the water! They were small so I played catch and release with a pinched barb, and got some more firewood from the entrance trail area. The rest of the place was empty, and I loved it. It was really damp, and before I hijack this thread, I'll move it to a trip report so the boss doesn't report me to Santa.

Thanks for the info Trout!

Mahoosic

3:00 p.m. on January 4, 2010 (EST)
71 reviewer rep
440 forum posts

Siting oneself away from the stream/water both makes the site more enjoyable and less likely to be traveled through, and helps keep the trail/stream corridor more attractive and (perhaps) less prone to erosion. And not only does it take one away from the critters, but also allows the critters more unimpeded access to their water. Good idea all 'round.

1:08 a.m. on January 12, 2010 (EST)
0 reviewer rep
25 forum posts

I do agree about the LNT principles but last year I was blessed with a night in my ultralight hammock only a few yards from a bubbling creek. No animals or soggy wood but the native brook trout were neat to watch in the pools. That was an overnighter to get away from it all but when I do trips longer than a couple days, I stay clear of streams. Also bears like to travel creeks too...

11:25 a.m. on January 22, 2010 (EST)
MODERATOR REVIEW CORPS
658 reviewer rep
2,148 forum posts

If you take a drive in the early morning or at dusk up a road that follows any one of the abundant rivers in the Appalachains here in TN, you will frequiently see black bears foraging the stream beds. I am sure they do the same thing in the backcounrty.

11:35 a.m. on January 22, 2010 (EST)
MODERATOR REVIEW CORPS
998 reviewer rep
3,481 forum posts

Yes they do. In the Unaka mountains in NC (Cherokee NF, GSMNP, Nantahala, etc) there are as many as 2 blackies per square mile, according the Parks & National Forests own data.

I'm sure they get thirsty and hungry and use the creeks and streams just like we do.

September 22, 2014
Quick Reply

Please sign in to reply

 
More Topics
This forum: Older: Sigg Water Bottle Recall/Exchange Newer: Holiday Camping
All forums: Older: Build your own custom tent footprint with attachment points Newer: Bugs/Insects for your next camp meal