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dog gear - sleeping pad?

3:12 p.m. on April 21, 2010 (EDT)
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I searched the forum on this one but didn't see anything.

Does anyone bring some type of pad for their dog in the tent? I figure it would help with their warmth (I know ... they're dogs) ... and protect the bottom of my tent at the same time.

what do you use? I'm not wanting to add much weight or space carrying it.

if i don't bring something, they'll sleep on me.

Any other dog gear thoughts? (besides leash, water, food, pack, light for collar)

4:27 p.m. on April 21, 2010 (EDT)
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I don't have a dog, adk40, so I can only tell you this.

Several companies make travel beds and pads specifically for dogs, some of which may be light enough for backpacking:

http://www.trailspace.com/gear/dog-gear/beds-shelters/

You might be able to make something on your own though.

5:38 p.m. on April 21, 2010 (EDT)
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In Norway we have this Jervehiet https://jerven.secure.flexiweb.no/page/4438/

It has a double bottom to accomodate a closed cell sleeping mat, and it has two layers top. The inner is removable for washing separately. Very nice piece of work, I am thinking of buying it. But it is pricey, 170$ is the asked price :( For conditions in winter here it is worth the price, but it might be overkill for where adk40 is planning to hike. Our conditions could best be compared to Alaska in winter.

To protect the bottom from the dog is best done by cotting the claws short. Which dog do you have adk40?

7:08 p.m. on April 21, 2010 (EDT)
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I always take a pad for my dog.

I use the cheap blue pad from Wal-mart and cut it to size.

It works well as he stays on it all night.

8:50 p.m. on April 21, 2010 (EDT)
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great thoughts all -

alicia - i checked some of those out - but just not light enough for me to carry. though, i'm sure they would love it.

otto - that's wicked cool! i think tucker (my yellow lab) would LOVE that - he's a under-the-cover kind of boy. griffin (the black lab) would wonder what i'm doing! if i venture in harsher weather - i do need to consider this.

dreamer - i think i'm on your side there - a blue pad from wal-mart cut to size. i'll check it out. how's the weight? i plan on using it too when hanging outside the tent - they're spoiled and love the "comforts" of home.

my pack is growing heavier by the minute.

9:15 p.m. on April 21, 2010 (EDT)
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Yes, if I had a dog, I'd go with the cheap foam pad too (at least in summer)! You may even find someone with an extra they don't use.

9:35 p.m. on April 21, 2010 (EDT)
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Yes, for anything other than extreme conditions a closed cell foam pad cut in half should work, they can even be used as padding under a dog pack.

Otto is correct, keeping the dogs nails cut should be enough. I never had a problem with the dog damaging the tent floor, although mine spent most of his time sleeping in the vestibule.

5:54 p.m. on April 22, 2010 (EDT)
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my pack is growing heavier by the minute.

How is that possible? With two dogs both in the range of 30-40 kg, I would surely have had a much lesser pack due to the dogs. My dog is just under 30 kg, and in summer he carries around 10kg. (from 12 to 8 is usual) That includes his own food and gear, + a few extra kilos for me. Just start using backpack on the dogs, and soon they'll love it. On a weekend trip the dog contributes with at least 5 kilos off my shoulders.

One caution regarding the breeds you have. They use to love water, so be sure to have things they carry in watertight bags.

7:18 a.m. on April 24, 2010 (EDT)
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Hi Adk40,

Otterstover has the right idea, dogs should and can carry their own gear! If what they need won't fit in their own pack due to size or shape, trade off some of your stuff for theirs. Otterstovers suggestion of water proof bags makes sense for these guys if they love water. If they are carrying important items I wouldn't let them out of your sight. You wouldn't want to go searching for a lost pack if it came loose on a romp in the woods.The only thing to consider is fitness. They should be conditioned to be able to carry this added weight. A dog may be very fit due to lots of exercise but that changes when you add weight that they have never carried before. Muscle or leg injuries are something you want to avoid. On your normal walks start with a few pounds and gradually work up to the full load they will be carrying. They also will need time to get used to the packs if they have never carried them before. It may also be useful to talk to your vet and make a doggie medical kit for your pooches. A lot of the drugs we take are toxic to animals and dog dosages can differ greatly from human. Good luck and have fun!

Jacqueline

12:21 p.m. on April 24, 2010 (EDT)
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Good point Jacqueline. Friend of mine has a Vorsteher, and they lost a lot of stuff cause the dog took loose on a chase for some birds on the mountains. When it came back the pack were gone. Stupid fools even had bought a camouflage colored pack, = impossible to find. When you buy a pack make sure it is neon-red or something easily visible.

To start with just use a empty pack, then perhaps a can of beer or something that is easy to make level weight between the two sides. This is the only thing that is a bit cumberesome making the pack stay level on the dog.

12:35 p.m. on April 24, 2010 (EDT)
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A can of beer - hmm, now we're talking.

my dogs are used to packs and are quite fit. i'm not worried about their ability. outside of placing foam pad under their pack - how else would you strap it on to them? i'll dig up a foam pad and cut in half - one for each of them then.

excellent point about water/swimming - they'll be carrying their food and they seek swimming holes.

1:10 a.m. on May 11, 2010 (EDT)
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I searched the forum on this one but didn't see anything.

Does anyone bring some type of pad for their dog in the tent? I figure it would help with their warmth (I know ... they're dogs) ... and protect the bottom of my tent at the same time.

what do you use? I'm not wanting to add much weight or space carrying it.

if i don't bring something, they'll sleep on me.

Any other dog gear thoughts? (besides leash, water, food, pack, light for collar)

apparently sled dogs dont need them, in helena thayers book Polar Dream the dog she brought slept right out on the ice in subzero weather and had no trouble, im not sure if other breeds can do that or not, or how much acclimating they need, but during milder weather most dogs sleep fairly well on bare ground.

9:17 a.m. on May 11, 2010 (EDT)
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I just bring a small felt blanket that my dog sleeps on at home around the house. Rolls up very small and I use the daisy chain on the outside of her pack to strap it on. Helps to protect the tent floor too to an extent. And it weighs very little. But when there is snow on the ground she likes to dig a hole and sleep in it (siberian husky) , Otherwise she likes to curl up on the felt. Probally cost me like a dollar or two at a fabric store for a yard.

8:38 p.m. on May 13, 2010 (EDT)
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With a Siberian Husky (SH) I would not have bothered too much. My first two dogs were SHs, and when we got the first dog I built a nice doghouse where she could sleep. The doghouse was built according to the SH-club spesifications, and we had some rags inside for comfort.

It was the most useless thing I did, for she NEVER went into it. Always slept outside the house, rain or snowstorm or whatever. When we got the second dog, I watched to see if he would use the doghouse. But no! He too slept just on the ground. Even in -30c they refused to sleep inside.

10:34 p.m. on May 13, 2010 (EDT)
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My dog does the same thing.

I built a very nice dog house, it even has an air conditioner for summer, but my dog sleeps outside during Fall, Winter, and Spring.

My dog has a dense double coat and seems just fine in temps well below freezing. When he was young I used to let him come inside fearing he was cold, but he would get overheated and stand at the door to go back outside.

I wish I could do that.

5:42 p.m. on June 2, 2010 (EDT)
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Hmmm.....I have a German Shorthair Pointer, and he would have energy to go all day with a pack on. However, he is also a water fan, and I wouldn't want him diving in a river with extra weight on. I guess I would just have to leash him up near water deeper than his height as he has been known to occasionally have selective hearing when excited.

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