Do You Try to Limit Your Scent?

11:35 a.m. on August 10, 2010 (EDT)
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Do you avoid soaps and shampoos that are scented? Are you using a pure castile soap to limit oder and impact on the environment?

I mainly slip into to the woods wanting to be unseen and not noticed at all for camera reasons. I am experimenting now with Dr. Bonners Hemp Unscented Baby Mild Pure Castile Soap. It a multi-tasker. I've used it to wash my hair, body, teeth, clothes, and dishes so far.

I don't care for the taste, but if it is only used backpacking, it will do fine as a toothpaste. I like the way it feels on my skin. It feels like it rinses off easier. Does a decent job as shampoo.

What are you using?

11:59 a.m. on August 10, 2010 (EDT)
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Wash? In the woods and hills? Naaahh, never! {;=>D

12:08 p.m. on August 10, 2010 (EDT)
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Wash? In the woods and hills? Naaahh, never! {;=>D

;-)

12:31 p.m. on August 10, 2010 (EDT)
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I had my yearly bath a year ago, maybe thats why I have'nt found a job yet. :P

In the woods I bath with available water, use no soap,shampoo or anything. Even at home I shower and wash my hair but dont use soaps on my skin, its lightly wrinkly enough at almost 55 without drying it out more with soap.

3:10 p.m. on August 10, 2010 (EDT)
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Iam with Bill on this one.Besides here in the pnw the water is cold as hell year round.If out for longer times i may take a quick swim or sponge style bath to clean up a bit but this is about it for me.ymmv

3:24 p.m. on August 10, 2010 (EDT)
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To strike a useful note that is midway between the posts above, some recent studies have concluded that Americans tend to wash themselves too often.

Washing with water and sand is often sufficient. Natural talc (aka, soapstone) powder is good for quick cleaning, especially in low-water areas, is inexpensive, and weighs little. Talc also works well as a dry shampoo.

The best way to reduce other body odors is, perhaps, diet. Carnivores stink (so their prey can detect them better?) while herbivores do not (I'm sure there are exceptions). But if you use a deodorant and would carry one into the wild, I'm told that a block of natural alum will last a long time.

3:32 p.m. on August 10, 2010 (EDT)
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My mother who grew up in a soddy (a cabin made from stacked up grass and soil clumps) on the prairie near Wichita KS (she died at age 80 in 1996) said she used to take baths in an old wash tub barely ankle deep. They would wash up as far as "possible", down as far as "possible" then wash possible! :) In the summers they often did what the ole cowboy is doing above in the water trough.

4:23 p.m. on August 10, 2010 (EDT)
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I guess climate plays a role in what we do. My last trip out the night lows never dipped below 74 degrees and day time highs were upper 90's with one day 101.

For the most part I think studies are done by people looking to validate their point of view and are not objective. And usually done for people with too much time on their hands. :-)

I grew up on a ranch and hunted most of my life. I can say I've never been around a herbivore that doesn't smell except for a newborn fawn. Again that may be climate.

I've seen my dogs, wild dogs, and coyotes roll in carcasses. I would guess to hide their scent. Hmmm, wonder if that is an option? :-)

My mother grew up in a squatter shack on a place where my grandfather grew cotton. Bathing was done with a bucket down by the creek along with the laundry. Dishes were cleaned in the sand that surrounded the shack. I have a photo around here somewhere of her posing in a newly sown dress made from flour sacks.

6:00 p.m. on August 10, 2010 (EDT)
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...Washing with water and sand is often sufficient.

I supposedly am "tough-skinned" and have a "thick hide". But I think I would find washing with sand a bit on the rough side.

The best way to reduce other body odors is, perhaps, diet. Carnivores stink (so their prey can detect them better?) while herbivores do not (I'm sure there are exceptions).

OMW, you must never have spent much time on a ranch or farm. Cows, horses, sheep, and goats all stink (though having grown up around them, I don't find the smells all that repulsive). Goat breath can be pretty overpowering sometimes. Camels are even worse. Pigs are omnivores, but they stink, too.

9:15 p.m. on August 10, 2010 (EDT)
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Bill,

Actually, I've had my days handmilking the cow, turning the separator, and feeding the skim milk to the pigs (in deep bedding). And I have slept in the loft above the pigs for warmth and the smell was not bad at all. OTOH, a local mink farm was not my favorite place to linger when I was a kid.

OTOH, I have worked on a hog farm with hybrid swine in long barns. The pigs were fed fine fresh grain (to make Canadian bacon); enough to feed several people, probably. The pigs did their best in terms of hygiene, but the manure troughs were not to be confused with a field of pansies.

So, I take your point; but I wonder if herbivores in wild conditions might not be less odorous than the cultivated product maintained in large numbers in close quarters.

I find, personally, that I tend to emit the odor of my food through my pores; I imagine you do as well. Eat a lot of garlic and you will smell of garlic, not just your breath, but your body as well. If I eat a lot of meat, I notice that, in an olfactory sense, as well. Am I peculiar in this? Perhaps.

9:54 p.m. on August 10, 2010 (EDT)
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Bill,

Actually, I've had my days handmilking the cow, turning the separator, and feeding the skim milk to the pigs (in deep bedding). And I have slept in the loft above the pigs for warmth and the smell was not bad at all. OTOH, a local mink farm was not my favorite place to linger when I was a kid.

OTOH, I have worked on a hog farm with hybrid swine in long barns. The pigs were fed fine fresh grain (to make Canadian bacon); enough to feed several people, probably. The pigs did their best in terms of hygiene, but the manure troughs were not to be confused with a field of pansies.

So, I take your point; but I wonder if herbivores in wild conditions might not be less odorous than the cultivated product maintained in large numbers in close quarters.

I find, personally, that I tend to emit the odor of my food through my pores; I imagine you do as well. Eat a lot of garlic and you will smell of garlic, not just your breath, but your body as well. If I eat a lot of meat, I notice that, in an olfactory sense, as well. Am I peculiar in this? Perhaps.

You are correct and I smell like scotch whiskey most days.

10:07 p.m. on August 10, 2010 (EDT)
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Ummm, wow, pigs, goats, cows and horses. I guess they don't use soap, eh? :)


As for soap ... I use CampSuds (is it a coincidence someone else just asked about this product in another thread? :). I have rarely, if ever, used it for bathing though. I think that's what the OP asked.

Actually this is an issue that irks me. I'd LOVE to be able to stop while hiking and jump in that oh-so-inviting mountain lake. But I don't, because I inevitably have slathered myself with sunscreen and/or bug repellent. I don't want to mess up such a beautiful place and see an "oil slick" left behind in my wake.

Anyway, back to the OP's question: I don't use toothpaste or shampoo when I'm in the backcountry. I use limited amounts (as in "a few drops") of Campsuds to wash my cooking/eating utensils. When I'm getting ready to leave for a backcountry trip (well, to anywhere "bear country") I avoid using scented shampoos, soaps, whatevers, immediately prior to leaving.

If by some chance I'm not recently-slathered with sunblock and repellents, and come across an inviting body of water, and the air temperature is right, I'll stop for a refreshing dip, and a pseudo "bath" :).

So, as an extension to the OP's question, I'm curious how many of you who'd normally partake in a dip in a cool mountain lake (or faster moving stream, river, etc) ... but avoid it since you've used sunblock/repellent?

10:19 p.m. on August 10, 2010 (EDT)
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On three or four day trips I just keep my hands, arms, and face clean for the most part.

On longer trips I jump in the water for a couple minutes, clothes on. Plain water will get rid of most soil & odor. If the water is just too cold, I can wash off with a micro fiber towel & a dab of soap.

As far as soaps, I do carry soap, usually just camp suds or Doctor Bronners, or some such type. I try my best to only carry unscented products.

Just a funny note about remaining unseen, I have a couple buddies I met in Tennessee who hunt in blue jeans and a green hoodie, or other similar clothes, no camo needed. After hunting with them a few times I started to get the impression they couldn't afford camo. After all, their guns were old, their trucks were old, they hunted strictly for food, and so on. I asked them why they didn't just go to Goodwill or something and buy it cheap.

Both of them basically said the same thing: Camo is for greenhorn city folk that need their clothing to do their hiding for them. If you get a good spot and don't move the animals don't see you.

I've come to believe they are right for the most part.

10:33 p.m. on August 10, 2010 (EDT)
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If you get a good spot and don't move the animals don't see you.

I've come to believe they are right for the most part.

I agree with that. But I don't like sitting. I probably see more game moving around in my city folk greenhorn long sleeve cammo top than your buddies do sitting because I cover more area. :-)

7:09 a.m. on August 11, 2010 (EDT)
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So, as an extension to the OP's question, I'm curious how many of you who'd normally partake in a dip in a cool mountain lake (or faster moving stream, river, etc) ... but avoid it since you've used sunblock/repellent?

I hadn't considered getting into the water supply. I have a Sea to Summit Pocket shower.

I do use insect repellent when needed, but not sunblock. My ancestry along with long sleeves and a hat makes sunblock an unnecessary product.

11:59 a.m. on August 11, 2010 (EDT)
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.. Eat a lot of garlic and you will smell of garlic, not just your breath, but your body as well....

Actually, it is not only garlic, but a lot of other foods as well. It is well known that eating soft fruits tends to attract mosquitoes, black flies, and other annoying flying insects, and that eating garlic tends to act as a natural repellent. I try to avoid soft fruits (bananas especially) for a few days before a trip into mosquito country and eat lots of garlic. Sometimes I forget - and the cloud of insects around me and landing on all exposed skin reminds me (but us Old GreyBearded Ones with incipient Alzheimers tend to forget such things quickly).

12:26 p.m. on August 11, 2010 (EDT)
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Garlic was my best repellent when I biked across Alaska in 2006. I started using garlic mixed into my cooked foods or taken a clove without chewing like a pill with water in the morning. The bugs fly around you still somewhat annoying but at least they don't bite!

1:23 p.m. on August 11, 2010 (EDT)
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trouthunter said:

If you get a good spot and don't move the animals don't see you.

I've come to believe they are right for the most part.

I agree with that. But I don't like sitting. I probably see more game moving around in my city folk greenhorn long sleeve cammo top than your buddies do sitting because I cover more area. :-)

Hunting and photography are two different disciplines, with some similarities of course. I just thought their insight on the matter was interesting.

It seems like some people are quick to assume that buying lots of gear gives them skills that actually you have to develop over time. That was their main point I think.

As you know, many animals blend in to their surroundings quite well, but I have always thought that they practice a stealth far beyond that. Many animals avoid detection by moving out of sight before you arrive, or moving only when you are not looking at them, they are very keen on this.

I once had a Doe run out of sight as I entered a meadow, only to have the Doe circle around behind me and watch me. Very impressive. I wish I had a photo of her peering around from behind the tree!

10:00 p.m. on August 11, 2010 (EDT)
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I have tried out King Soopers generic soap and hair cleaner stuff and have not had women run very far, so far. Maybe a couple thousand yards or so. ................... Does not mean it will not happen so just keep hunting.

Not sure the effect on wild aminals, other than women of the human kind.

2:02 a.m. on August 12, 2010 (EDT)
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Speaking of limiting your scent ... I find it interesting that we need to store insect repellent in our bear canister - yet we slather the stuff on ourselves, and most likely don't bathe before going to sleep in our tent at night.

Why is it a concern if it's in the bottle but not if it's on our skin? :)

7:30 a.m. on August 12, 2010 (EDT)
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It seems like some people are quick to assume that buying lots of gear gives them skills that actually you have to develop over time. That was their main point I think.

As you know, many animals blend in to their surroundings quite well, but I have always thought that they practice a stealth far beyond that. Many animals avoid detection by moving out of sight before you arrive, or moving only when you are not looking at them, they are very keen on this.

That's a good point. Wether it's backpacking, cycling, rock climbing or anything else we want to do, there are basic principles one must grasp and learn.

Until recently my daughter was a competitive gymnast. Injuries ended her career. Each year of competition built on top of the other. Each skill learned lead to the next skill level. There is no fast track to being an elite gymnast. A gymnasts ability to preform at a high level is in direct correlation with the level of desire and motivation and the time spent in the gym to acquire the skills needed to get to the top. But I digress.

Humans for the most part move through their surroundings like they are not part of it, but merely clumsy visitors. The pace we move and the noise we make along with the scents that we broadcast downwind for miles will limit our success to some degree of being apart of our surroundings and enjoying the wildlife around us.


Speaking of limiting your scent ... I find it interesting that we need to store insect repellent in our bear canister - yet we slather the stuff on ourselves, and most likely don't bathe before going to sleep in our tent at night.

Why is it a concern if it's in the bottle but not if it's on our skin? :)

I've often wondered that. I don't lay down at night unless I've done something to feel clean. If water is available, it's a shower. If it's a dry camp, it's unscented baby wipes.

11:15 a.m. on August 12, 2010 (EDT)
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Speaking of limiting your scent ... I find it interesting that we need to store insect repellent in our bear canister - yet we slather the stuff on ourselves, and most likely don't bathe before going to sleep in our tent at night.

Why is it a concern if it's in the bottle but not if it's on our skin? :)

That's a good question.

There are other members on Trailspace who may be able to give you a more thorough answer, but my understanding is that the guidelines put in place address several aspects of bear behavior, including their curiosity and ability to learn or adapt quickly.

What I have read and been taught is that it is very important to make sure we do not provide opportunities for bears to learn about human objects, how to open containers, or obtain any pleasure or food from our supplies. Even a container left on the ground, or anywhere accessible can entertain a bear for a spell, and they will learn undesirable behaviors from that experience if they can open it or get anything out of it. Once they associate gratification of any form with humans they learn to seek out human activity.

Bear resistant containers on the other hand, teach the bear that trying to open it is a waste of time and energy, the same applies to bear bagging.

That may not be a completely accurate explanation but it is the best I can do off the top of my head.

Maybe someone else can elaborate.

----------------------------------

ambersdad,

I know you are proud of your daughters hard work & accomplishments as a gymnast, please tell her I am as well!

I had a similar experience, a motorcycle wreck ended my ability to perform well in my own athletic endeavors. However the personal growth I gained during that time has been very useful in other ares of my life.

12:04 p.m. on August 12, 2010 (EDT)
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Trout,

Ex gymnast now. :-) Thanks.

That is a good answer as far as storing scents away in containers. Have no issue at all with that. It's good sound advice. But it does not sound logical to go to sleep at night without removing as many of those scents as possible from your skin and or tent. You and your tent are easier to open than the container. :-) Are we deciding to rely on the hope that their natural fear of humans limits our exposure to possible uncomfortable situations. I know little about bear behavior other than what I read here and have seen on different wildlife programs.

randy

12:34 p.m. on August 12, 2010 (EDT)
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I use honey and olive oil as a skin conditioner before I snuggle down in my sleeping bag. Is this a bad idea?

;)

12:40 p.m. on August 12, 2010 (EDT)
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I use honey and olive oil as a skin conditioner before I snuggle down in my sleeping bag. Is this a bad idea?


;)

Does your sleeping bag resemble an over sized hot dog bun? :-)

12:46 p.m. on August 12, 2010 (EDT)
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I do my best to use only unscented products, of course insect repellent does have a scent.

I think the idea is to minimize our scent and other attractors as much as possible, keeping in mind nothing is 100%. You have to mitigate your risk any way possible.

I think this is a community effort, by following the rules and guidelines the backpacking community help teach bears there is no reward in raiding camps and that benefits both campers and bears.

I read a study recently that stated bears can spend as much as 20 hours a day foraging for food as winter approaches, and that females will cover up to 20 sq. miles a day, and males up to 60 sq. miles.

In the areas I backpack the estimated black bear population averages out to 2 bears per sq. mile. I have always followed the rules concerning camp cleanliness and food storage and have never had a problem other than little critters.

I did spend a weekend on Pinnacle mountain a few years ago where another group of campers brought a small charcoal grill with them and cooked hot dogs & hamburgers right in their camp, they left their cooking stuff out all night as well. They didn't loose anything as best I know, but they sure didn't follow the rules clearly posted in the campground and on the literature available.

The next morning I kindly reminded them we were in bear country by telling a bear joke, the leader of the group replied: "We got something for those bears."

I always thought that is kinda like going over a waterfall on a wooden raft with a $100.00 life jacket.

I was taught prevention & avoidance is the intelligent approach, I've never understood why some people are so mule headed.

Do you think they just hate rules? Or do they believe they are smarter than people who spend their whole lives studying the subject?

What do you think?

12:52 p.m. on August 12, 2010 (EDT)
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gonzan said:

I use honey and olive oil as a skin conditioner before I snuggle down in my sleeping bag. Is this a bad idea?

;)

Does your sleeping bag resemble an over sized hot dog bun? :-)

That's funny!

12:55 p.m. on August 12, 2010 (EDT)
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...Do you think they just hate rules? Or do they believe they are smarter than people who spend their whole lives studying the subject?
What do you think?

Naaah, just super macho. They are going to kill any marauding bear bare-handed, then skin it with their Leatherman and use the hide as a groundcloth - that will scare any other bears away.

1:03 p.m. on August 12, 2010 (EDT)
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trouthunter said:

...Do you think they just hate rules? Or do they believe they are smarter than people who spend their whole lives studying the subject?
What do you think?

Naaah, just super macho. They are going to kill any marauding bear bare-handed, then skin it with their Leatherman and use the hide as a groundcloth - that will scare any other bears away.

I think for most is is a combination of "macho" and lacking a realistic idea of how much time or chance they would have of defending themselves.

1:06 p.m. on August 12, 2010 (EDT)
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Yes...no shortage of those types it seems sometimes.

I worked part time on a farm in my twenties, there's nothing like working around big animals to make you realize how puny we are.

I was always worried about number 99, a large Brahma bull who didn't like me for some reason. Let's see, my 150 lbs. vs 1500....

1:11 p.m. on August 12, 2010 (EDT)
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I do my best to use only unscented products, of course insect repellent does have a scent.

I think the idea is to minimize our scent and other attractors as much as possible, keeping in mind nothing is 100%. You have to mitigate your risk any way possible.

I think this is a community effort, by following the rules and guidelines the backpacking community help teach bears there is no reward in raiding camps and that benefits both campers and bears.

Sounds like pearls of wisdom and something to emulate.

So just between you and me, is it just a manly manly thing here on this forum to talk about issues that are important like bear cans and camp hygiene but poo poo our own?

I can understand that in much colder climates your body will not build up "The Funk" as fast as it does here in my world.

I guess I'm not smart enough to get it. It makes no sense to worry about all those other things if you smell like tuna fish sandwich left on the dashboard in the sun for three days. They don't need to try and open the bear can, they have you. What am I missing?


I was taught prevention & avoidance is the intelligent approach, I've never understood why some people are so mule headed.

Do you think they just hate rules? Or do they believe they are smarter than people who spend their whole lives studying the subject?

What do you think?

I have seen fools suffer great consequences when exhibiting that kind of brash arrogance / utter stupidity.

1:21 p.m. on August 12, 2010 (EDT)
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I personally clean up after cooking & eating with soap or hand sanitizer, I do this in my camp kitchen away from my sleep area and retire for the night with only a bottle of water in my shelter. Well, other than flashlight, shoes etc. but no food items or food on my face or sleeves.

This is particularly important to me since I often fish for supper when I can. Raccoons & rodents are also a major annoyance that can almost always be counted on to find me sooner or later. I love the little critters but they are not welcome to my only bit of food.

2:04 p.m. on August 12, 2010 (EDT)
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Trout,

I've seen on other threads where you have shared this approach. Sounds practical. I do things very similar

I have an interest in acquiring a lightweight breakdown-able fly fishing rig. There are a few places here in Oklahoma where one can actually trout fish. :-)

Do you use a fly or a spin reel?

3:42 p.m. on August 12, 2010 (EDT)
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I would love to visit Oklahoma & surrounding area one day.

I both fly & spin fish, and I prefer four piece rods of decent quality over the telescopic type. I started out with a three piece cane pole and later had several telescopic rods. The telescopic spin rods have terrible feel & action IMO. They are notorious for the last section being flimsy and weak. On the other hand you can get the Japanese style telescopic fly rods of descent quality, but these fish like a cane pole with no reel.

If I was stranded in the wilderness and could only have one rod (for trout) I would want a ultra light spinning reel and use natural bait.

Fly fishing is very cool, and a great art form, very relaxing to me as well, but a spinning rod with natural bait is deadly with a very limited amount of tackle and that's what I would want in a survival situation.

Of course Trout Unlimited will excommunicate you for saying things like that.

9:51 p.m. on August 12, 2010 (EDT)
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On overnight trips I do nothing for scent. On 3 or more night trips I take wet wipes and wipe down with those. Never do I use soap. I dont use sunscreen or bug spray, so I have no problems with once in a while jumping in the water to rinse off.

11:08 p.m. on August 12, 2010 (EDT)
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trouthunter said:

...Do you think they just hate rules? Or do they believe they are smarter than people who spend their whole lives studying the subject?
What do you think?

Naaah, just super macho. They are going to kill any marauding bear bare-handed, then skin it with their Leatherman and use the hide as a groundcloth - that will scare any other bears away.

Well, bears are pretty smart. So that would scare them away, wouldn't' it? heh heh :)

11:14 p.m. on August 12, 2010 (EDT)
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On overnight trips I do nothing for scent. On 3 or more night trips I take wet wipes and wipe down with those. Never do I use soap. I dont use sunscreen or bug spray, so I have no problems with once in a while jumping in the water to rinse off.

Hmm wow .. no sunscreen, no bug spray. I guess when I posted my comment about these, I forgot that there are people on here from all kinds of climates and environments, not just the ones i'm used to.

In New England (and much of California) it's hard to imagine not needing insect repellent. In CA - at high elevation in the Sierra, it's hard to imagine not using sunscreen...

10:44 a.m. on August 13, 2010 (EDT)
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Trout,

Parts of Oklahoma are well worth seeing. Much of it though is same ole same ole.

You may have talked me into going spinning reel first. I do plan on learning to use fly though sometime down the road.

Robby,

I would think insects would be a problem down there. I only have to deal with them at dawn and dusk. They don't do much during the day unless you are in a heavily forested area or the wind isn't blowing which is rare here.


I went to a dermatologist a few years ago for a check up. I never worried about the sun when I was younger. He told me to not waste my money on another visit. My Native American ancestry along with long sleeves and a hat reduces skin problems to a don't sweat it kind of thing.

11:02 a.m. on August 13, 2010 (EDT)
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Trout, what natural baits do you primarily use? Do you bring the bait with you, or are you mainly gathering natural & live bait from location?

3:29 p.m. on August 13, 2010 (EDT)
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Bugs are sever problem down here. I rather the bugs than the spray. Cant stand that stuff. I live in a Louisiana swamp, mosquitoes are a way of life. They are around all the time. Just cant stand the spray.

I also cant stand the greasy feel of suntan lotion (or any other lotion). As hot as it is here, I will wear long sleeves and long pants to not have to wear that stuff.

4:12 p.m. on August 13, 2010 (EDT)
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Trout, what natural baits do you primarily use? Do you bring the bait with you, or are you mainly gathering natural & live bait from location?

I use worms & can corn most times if I bring bait with me on fishing trips where I stay in front country campgrounds. Can corn is not good for the fish's digestive track and shouldn't be used for catch & release fishing according to most of what I read, but if I'm fishing for food it's not a concern to me. Worms & corn also raise the ire of some fishermen because unfortunately the cans / containers can be found littering the banks of many waterways.

For backpacking you can collect aquatic insects right from the water. This is the staple diet of many fish species and exactly what they are looking to feed upon. Many lures & flies are only imitations of these and if you use the real thing you are already ahead of the game.

The way I collect them ( lot of different ways) is to use a piece of fine bug netting pulled tight between two sticks (I sewed a sleeve in each end of mine to slide sticks in) or trekking poles. You flip some rocks over and agitate the soil underneath, holding the net in the water & downstream to catch any dislodged larva. One common type fished with are Hellgrammites, the larval form of the Dobson fly. You can also just pick the rocks up and find various larva clinging to the rocks surface many times. You can fly fish this way too if you had to, although it is sacrilegious. This way of fishing is primitive & sustainable, therefore good to know for living out in the wilderness or for survival, but not allowed in many places. Some of the best people at this will never be on TV or write books cause they're too busy fixin' their old truck.

You may want to wash your hands well to get rid of any scent before going back to camp. There....back on topic.

6:31 p.m. on August 13, 2010 (EDT)
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I would love to visit Oklahoma & surrounding area one day.

I would throw out a "give me a holler" some time if you want to hook up and roam a spot or two in my neck of the woods.

randy

6:43 p.m. on August 13, 2010 (EDT)
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Now in lame attempt to rescue this hijacked thread (it seems every thread eventually gravitates to bears bugs, and fishing).

I use castle soap. I wash daily in the backcountry, excepting extreme cold. Most of the time you can erect a tent and use solar radiation to create a warm space to wash in, such that even cold water is not too big a discomfort. I wash mainly because it freshens me up in a manner that goes beyond simply getting the grit and stink off. I enjoy camping a lot more when able to wash and don a clean set of clothes after a day’s toiling on the trail. Perhaps it’s my inner woman talking here!
Ed

August 20, 2014
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